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Using Systems Biology Based Approaches for Considerations Across the Life Course: Views from Public Health and Preventative Medicine. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Elaine Faustman, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This talk focuses on how public health and preventive medical scientists, as well as developmental and reproductive toxicologists, interpret and apply life course health developmental principles, with an emphasis on the first four principles of the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) framework (Health Development, Unfolding, Complexity, and Timing). The focus of this talk is on early development and childhood.

Learning Objectives: 1. Identifying how systems biology concepts inform public health decisions for improving health development 2. Defining the life course “exposome” taking lessons from a child cohort study 3. Discussing approaches for improving our understanding of within and between human variability across development using evolutionary biology principles 4. Applying ontologies for linking and translating observations across model systems and biomarkers for informing human population research 5. Understanding how integrating systems biology concepts improves our health surveillance and intervention

The Emerging Theoretical Framework of Life Course Health Development. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Neal Halfon, MD, MPH; Christopher Forrest, MD, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, Drs. Halfon and Forrest present the 7 principles that comprise their life course health development framework, including the empirical evidence that underlies each principle and the implications for future research. By shining a light on how early experience conditions future biological responses and influences health development pathways, the presenters hope to encourage theory building and testing, inspire innovative transdisciplinary research, and lead to future discussions that can help to mature the framework into a scientific model with descriptive, explanatory, and predictive utility.

Life Course Health Development of Individuals with Cerebral Palsy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Briano Di Rezze, PhD; Matthew Freeman, MA; Robert Palisano, PT, ScD, FAPTA; Debra Stewart, MSc, OT Reg. (Ont.). Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15:05 minutes.

Annotation: Together these researchers from the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research share their interpretive description of lifecourse health development of individuals with cerebral palsy to promote developmental capacities for future roles and healthy adult living beginning in childhood.

The Occupational (Im)Possibilities in a Segregated Neighborhood: A Matter of Justice in LCHD. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Jyothi Gupta, PhD, ORT/L, FAOTA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the sixth in the LCRN’s series on Occupational Therapy and MCH: An Emerging Partnership to Improve Early Family Experiences and Life Course Health Development – features Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA. Dr. Gupta is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and Professor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at St. Catherine University. Her research interests are identifying contextual barriers to full participation of marginalized groups and identifying strategies to maximize participation. This webinar focuses on her experience in applying the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model to one of her community partner sites in rural Mississippi.

Learning Objectives: • Explore the conceptual synergy of life course health development (LCHD) model and the occupational perspective of health and well-being. • Describe the conceptual alignment of the occupational perspective to health development. • Discuss the occupational lives of children living in a racially segregated rural community and potential negative impact on health and well-being.

Rethinking the Role of Stress in Development: Emerging Evolutionary Perspectives. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Marco Del Giudice, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar explores the influence of stress on development and health from an evolutionary perspective. Current mainstream models are based on the concept of “toxic stress,” and emphasize the disruptive effects of chronic exposure to stressors during development (allostatic load). An emerging alternative approach suggests that the outcomes of early stress may often represent evolved adaptations to challenging environments rather than instances of dysregulation. The webinar presents the main tenets of alternative models and their implications for health development, discusses key empirical findings, and highlights novel directions for research on this crucial topic.

From Early Adversity to Permanency: Implications for Occupational and Life Course Health Development. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Amy Lynch, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the impact of early adversity and trauma upon the occupational development and success of children developing in an atypical environment - namely those who have experienced foster care and/or international adoption - including the "ripple effect" across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives:

Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) to Conduct Life Course Analyses (Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development). Year Developed: 2014. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Narayan Sastry, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar presents an overview of conducting lifecourse analysis with the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). Origins of PSID, study designs and core PSID content areas are reviewed. An additional example of analyzing the long-term demographic effects of Hurricane Katrina on the pre-storm population in New Orleans in also included.

Learning Objectives:

Special Instructions: Click on "Webinar recording available here" to view a 15-minute preview on Dropbox. To view the entire webinar, download or add it to your Dropbox. Please note that during the first few minutes of this webinar, there is no visual, so you will see a black screen.

Using the New England Family Study (NEFS) to Conduct Life Course Analyses (Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development). Year Developed: 2014. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Stephen Buka, ScD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the third in the LCRN’s series on Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development – features Stephen Buka, ScD. Dr. Buka was at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) for 20 years in the Departments of Maternal Child Health and Epidemiology, and currently holds an appointment as an Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology at HSPH. He is Professor and Chair of Epidemiology at Brown University, and also directs Brown’s Center for Population Health and Clinical Epidemiology and the Center for the Study of Human Development. Dr. Buka is an expert in the measurement of the key obstetric events and their effect on adult neuropsychiatric conditions and in childhood. As director of the follow-up of the NE CPP, which he has followed for over 30 years, he has expertise in the baseline biological and clinical measures during pregnancy, delivery and early life. He is the custodian of newly collected biological samples, has expertise in location and recruitment of the NE CPP, and maintains the connection to the central NCPP database; all of which will be critical to the success of SCOR Project 1. Dr. Buka is also the PI of the Providence, RI and Bristol County, MA sites of the National Children’s Study, a new prenatal cohort with many similarities to the CPP which aims to study 100,000 children across the United States, following them from before birth until age 21. He has worked with Dr. Goldstein for over 15 years. - See more at: http://www.lcrn.net/using-the-nefs-to-conduct-life-course-analyses/#sthash.MEc1JySO.dpuf

Special Instructions: Click on "Webinar recording available here" to view a 15-minute preview on Dropbox. To view the entire webinar, download or add it to your Dropbox.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) to Conduct Life Course Analyses (Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development). Year Developed: 2014. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Elizabeth Cooksey, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar, part of the LCRN’s series based on the Handbook of Life Course Health Development and features Elizabeth Cooksey as the presenter. In this training, participants will learn how to use the NLS surveys to conduct research analysis. A brief history of the survey, examples from the field and research illustrations are presented.

Learning Objectives:

Special Instructions: Click on "Slides available here" and/or "Audio available here."

Using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) to Conduct Life Course Analyses (Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development). Year Developed: 2014. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Amanda Geller, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the fourth in the LCRN’s series on Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development – features Amanda Geller, PhD, presenting on the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) of nearly 5,000 children born in large US cities between 1998 and 2000, roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents. The FFCWS consists of parent interviews at birth and ages 1, 3 and 5, plus in-home assessments of children and home environments at ages 3 and 5. Amanda Geller is a Clinical Associate Professor of Sociology at New York University. Her research examines the interactions between criminal justice policy and socioeconomic disadvantage, and their joint effects on urban neighborhoods, families and individuals. She has worked with the FFCWS for nearly 10 years, and served as the Executive Director of the Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop from 2012-2014. Her work with the study focuses specifically on the role of parental incarceration in families; she also studies the administration of justice related to police-public interactions. Her work has been published in outlets including Demography, the Journal of Marriage and Family, and (as of October 2014) the American Journal of Public Health. In the summer of 2013, she presented at a White House Workshop on Parental Incarceration convened by the American Bar Foundation. She has a Ph.D. in Social Policy Analysis from the Columbia University School of Social Work, and Masters of Engineering and Bachelor of Science degrees in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering from Cornell University. - See more at: http://www.lcrn.net/using-the-ffcws-to-conduct-life-course-analyses/#sthash.QTbftpy2.dpuf

Special Instructions: Click on "Webinar recording available here" to view a 15-minute preview on Dropbox. To view the entire webinar, download or add it to your Dropbox.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.