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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 11 found.

What is Policy? What is the Policy-Making Process?. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 104 minutes.

Annotation: In this presentation, a recording of a course at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Dr. Handler outlines the terminology used in public policy and the types of public policy as they are practiced; the process and paradigms of making public policy, including the legislative process; and the role of economics in the policy-making process. She rounds off this lecture with an analysis of the most common public policy instruments.

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

Contextualizing Guidance Workbook. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Alverex, MD, MPH; John Lavis, MD, MSC, PHD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 70 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: The Contextualizing Guidance Workbook can help professionals consider factors from the broader health system and political system so you make the most appropriate policy recommendations and decisions.

Developing Evidence About Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN, reviews the importance of collecting standardized data and demonstrates how the information is being used to make the case for public health services. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; Program staff and managers working in environmental health and communicable disease prevention. A recording, slides, and a slides handout are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local health department administrative data can be used to demonstrate the value of public health services. • Describe the need for and value of standardized public health services data for public health performance, advocacy, and building evidence. • Describe opportunities for filling critical gaps in local public health services data.

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink.

The Nuts and Bolts of the PHAB Accreditation Process. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Public Health Accreditation Board. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This module gives health department leaders, Accreditation Coordinators, and accreditation team members a beginning base of knowledge about what is involved in leading their health department through the accreditation process. While targeting Accreditation Coordinators, it gives anyone an idea of what a health department must do to prepare and begin the PHAB accreditation process.

Learning Objectives: • List the different types of information that will be required to include in the PHAB application. • Describe the accreditation process and the responsibilities of the accreditation coordinator in each of the steps. • State the three pre-requisites and the corresponding PHAB standard.

Continuing Education: 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s), 0.75 ANCC contact hours, 1.00 hour of participation, 1.00 hour of Public Health Continuing Education (CPHCE) credit; expires 9/29/2017.

Understanding the PHAB Standards and Measures and Documentation Requirements. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Public Health Accreditation Board. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This module gives health department leaders, governance, Accreditation Coordinators, and accreditation teams a beginning base of knowledge about how the Standards and Measures are structured and an idea about the documentation required to meet the standards and measures. As health departments prepare to apply for PHAB accreditation, the standards and measures are the framework for evaluating the health department’s processes, services, and outcomes, and their progress toward goals and objectives.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the purpose, content and structure of the PHAB standards and measures. • List the PHAB domains. • Use the PHAB Guide to Standards and Measures.

Continuing Education: 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s), 0.75 ANCC contact hours, 0.75 hours of participation, 1.00 hour of Public Health Continuing Education (CPHCE) credit

Practical Law for Public Health Officials. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Jeffrey Killip, JD, MPH and Susan Allan, MD, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Do you know how the law contributed to motor vehicle safety, vaccination, or safer workplaces? Law reform or litigation has played a part in most of the greatest public health achievements in the 20th century. As public health professionals and leaders, understanding public health law and how to use it is essential to protecting the public’s health. In this module, you will learn how to assess when to involve legal counsel, how to get effective legal advice, and what laws will affect your decision-making ability when facing public health threats. By the end, you will be able to use core concepts of public health law to more effectively protect the public’s health while avoiding legal trouble.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize legal issues. • Formulate legal questions. • Implement effective strategies for working with legal counsel. • Describe key principles of public health law. • Identify key public health laws that govern leadership’s responsibilities, authority, and limitations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 1.5 CNE Contact Hours

Family Advocacy and Involvement in Title V Programs. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rylin Rodgers, BA. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes. Registration required

Annotation: This webcast reviews the role of family advocates in collaborating with Title V program staff. The presenter describes the benefits of partnering with family advocates — such as providing different perspectives — and the support advocates can bring to maternal and child health policy and programs. The appropriate roles for family advocates are presented, such as leading advocacy groups, acting as grant reviewers, becoming members of Boards of Trustees, and acting as group facilitators, among other roles. In addition, the skills and training advocates need to successfully collaborate with Title V programs are also discussed. Lastly, the presenter leads a discussion of examples of successful models of partnership such as collaborations within the Alabama Health Department.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the benefits of partnering with families, including advocacy for Title V programs, and supporting maternal and child health policy. • Discuss appropriate roles for family advocates and how Title V programs can operationalize their involvement. • Discuss what skills and training family advocates need to be successful in partnership with Title V programs. • Provide examples of successful models for partnership between family advocates and Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs.

Special Instructions: To access the video, scroll down on the landing page to the “View Program” gray box and choose a player to open the presentation. [Note: Need Real Player or Windows Media Player to watch].

Continuing Education: Nurses 1 hour, Social Workers 1 hour

Basic Epidemiology. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center. Presenter(s): Iowa Department of Public Health. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive course introduces the field of epidemiology and its practice in the field of public health. The first module presents definitions of important terms, including determinants, transmission, case, communicability, prevalence, and incidence. Next, the course describes two models of the infectious disease process: (1) chain of infections and (2) the Epi Triangle (agent, host and environment). The third module describes the practice of epidemiology, with particular focus on outbreak investigation. Finally, the course concludes with an overview of surveillance, defining different types and components of successful systems. Examples, short quizzes and a post-test are used to reinforce learning.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss important terms and concepts for basic epidemiology practice. • Describe the inter-related aspects of the infectious disease process and methods of breaking this "chain" of infection. • Understand basic epidemiology in practice, using a case study of a food-borne outbreak as an example. • Perform basic surveillance tasks in an appropriate and timely manner. Utilize your regional epidemiologist as a resource for outbreak investigations.

Special Instructions: Registration to the Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center is required. Click "My Account" under the LMS Navigation. Click on "Create new account". Click on "Online Courses". Search for "Basic Epidemiology" and choose Epidemiology for the category.

Bloomberg Leadership Series: The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers. Year Developed: 2008. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Harvey Fineberg discusses his experiences with leadership and describes how his early career helped shape his evolution as a leader in public health, including roles as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and as the President of the Institute of Medicine. Throughout the lecture, he notes tips and strategies to influence and persuade policymakers. The second half of the presentation consists of a question and answer session with audience members, and addresses how to grab individuals’ attention and the importance of message framing. A discussion on the differences between storytelling, social movements and best practices concludes the talk.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.