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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 23 found.

CBPR: A Partnership Approach for Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 6.5 hours.

Annotation: Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a partnership approach to research that equitably involves community members, organization representatives, and academic researchers in all aspects of the research process. This course was originally released in 2009. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: • List the rationale, definition, and core principles of CBPR (CHES Area of Responsibility 4.2.7). • Describe strategies for forming, maintaining, sustaining, and evaluating CBPR partnerships (2.1.3, 4.7.2). • Discuss qualitative and quantitative data collection methods and interpretation (4.2.6). • Explain methods of dissemination and translation of research findings (4.6.8, 4.7.1, 4.7.5). • Identify benefits, challenges, and recommendations for using CBPR for research and social change (4.2.7).

Continuing Education: 605 Nursing Contact Hours (expires March 31, 2019); 6.5 CHES Category 1 CECH, Certificate of completion; $21 charge for CE credits

Medicaid and CHIP Fundamentals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Health Policy Forum. Presenter(s): Chris L. Peterson, MPP. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 51 minutes.

Annotation: This lecture covers the background of the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, explains how Medicaid and CHIP work independently and together. Topic covered include the statutory and program administration of the program (what are the federal and state roles), eligibility (who is covered), benefits and cost sharing (what is covered), and payment and financing issues (how much is covered). The lecture concludes with selected, real-life policy issues.

Learning Objectives:

Building Evidence to Improve the Structure, Governance and Funding of Local Public Health Through Practice-Based Research Networks . Year Developed: 2015. Source: n.a.. Presenter(s): Justeen Hyde and Jennifer Kertanis. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 50 minutes. TRAIN Link

Annotation: Are there better ways to organize, finance and deliver local public health services? Join us for a presentation of “real world” studies of local health departments in states of Connecticut and Massachusetts, two states with highly decentralized public health systems, that explore just that question. Learn about how practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are bringing together researchers and practitioners across the nation to identify strategies that work to maximize population health impact, cost effectiveness and health equity of public health systems.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the primary objectives of Public Health Systems and Services Research. • List at least three reasons why local health departments should be interested in the work of PBRNs. • Recognize how findings from CT and MA PBRN studies could be used to impact. • Recall how local health departments can learn more about PBRN research or participate in PBRN studies.

Continuing Education: NEPHTC Certificate

5-Minute MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Varies.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: 5-Minute MCH is a microlearning program designed to cover each of the 12 MCH Leadership Competencies. The program is structured using an easy-to-follow modular format designed to increase knowledge and skills through 5-minute intensive learning sessions. In module 1 of each competency, participants will learn about a new competency through a 5-minute video podcast. This includes learning what knowledge and skill sets each competency contains and how they are important in the daily work of MCH professionals. In module 2 of each competency, participants will receive 5 highly focused learning opportunities for that competency. Learners may take one or all of the trainings to sharpen knowledge and skills. In module 3 of each competency, participants will receive 5 implementation strategies to put knowledge to practice. Learners may share their experiences implementing the strategies on the 5-Minute Portal. In module 4 of each competency, participants will hear a 5-minute presentation from an expert in the field.

The ABCs of ACOs for MCH. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Christopher A. Kus, MD, MPH; Colleen A. Kraft, MD, FAAP; Cate Wilcox, MPH; Don Ross; Marilyn Hartzell, MEd. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Covered in this webinar are the roles of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in population health and how they integrate with community-based systems of care, including public health agencies, on a range of issues, such as care coordination and other MCH community services. The webinar presentations by an ACO provider, Medicaid staff, and Title V MCH and CYSHCN Directors highlight key considerations for maternal and child health populations, the role of public health in ACO implementation, and efforts to implement ACOs that have a focus on pediatric populations (particularly CSHCN).

Learning Objectives: • Increase knowledge of ACOs and ACOs that include MCH populations. • Increase understanding of how public health can play a role in ACOs. • Identify strategies and resources to collaborate with ACOs.

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part II - The Budget. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: All in the practice of public health know the importance of financial resources to carry out their activities. This very basic introduction course provides a definition of the growing field of public health finance, assists students to develop a working knowledge of the planning cycles in governmental public health organizations, understand how to navigate and use budget planning documents, forecasts, governmental financial statements, and grants to support important public health activities and priorities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance • Describe the Minnesota budget and forecast process • Explore public finance using examples from Minnesota health department s budget • Develop an understanding of financial statements • Understand the basics of grant proposals

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part I - The Business Plan. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: Practitioners in the field of public health find themselves in serious competition for funding. How do we make sure that the activities we advance to protect, maintain and promote the health of the public are a priority for funders. One of the ways we can improve our chances is to make a strong business case for our work. This brief overview will give you a simple outline to assist you in building a business plan for public health activities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance. • Identify three major domains of public health finance competencies (knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in practice). • Describe the financial cycle within organizations. • Explain the reasons for a business plan. • List the major sections of a business plan template.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

More than Money: The Keys to Achieving Long-Term Sustainability. Year Developed: 2013. Source: National Healthy Tomorrows Technical Assistance Resource Center at the American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Kevin D. Monroe. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Webinar 1: 65 minutes; webinar 2: 50 minutes; webinar 3: 66 minutes; webinar 4: 70 minutes.

Annotation: This four-part webinar series focuses on providing the public health community with practical knowledge on sustainability based on Mr. Monroe's "fundamental principles and practices to promote program sustainability" -- Results, Resources, and Relationships. These webinars are meant to apply broadly to Healthy Tomorrows projects and can be extrapolated to other Title V programs. Webinars include: (1) How to Package, Promote, or Re-Purpose Outcomes as Results; (2) Strategies for Sustaining Vital Program Resources; (3) How to Mine, Map, and Mobilize Relationships for Sustainability; and (4) How to Implement your Sustainability Plan. Sponsored in part by the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

Learning Objectives: Webinar 1: How to Package, Promote, or Re-Purpose Outcomes as Results: • Identify four key sustainability strategies related to Healthy Tomorrow outcomes and results. • Recognize that not all outcomes are equal and the three types of high-impact outcomes. • Consider ways to package and promote existing outcomes to garner the attention of potential supporters and investors. Webinar 2: Strategies for Sustaining Vital Program Resources: • Identify four key sustainability strategies related to Healthy Tomorrow resources. • Describe an asset-based approach to resource development. • Consider options for implementing a relationally rich approach to resource development. Webinar 3: How to Mine, Map, and Mobilize Relationships for Sustainability: • Identify three key trends. • Consider ways to mine, map, and mobilize grantees' sustainability networks. • Analyze the level of involvement of key stakeholders and partners in sustainability network. Webinar 4: How to Implement your Sustainability Plan: • Understand the virtuous cycle of results, resources, and relationships • Identify essential elements necessary for effective team approaches to sustainability planning. • Evaluate the progress of your sustainability planning efforts.

Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach (WISH Module 3). Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This training discusses various frameworks that inform an integrated systems approach to addressing the physical and mental health needs of women in a holistic manner. It is the third training in a six-part series designed for those public health and/or mental health professionals who oversee health programs and services for adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. It is strongly recommended that users complete the modules in the series in sequence. To see a complete listing for the series please go to the Training Series section of this site. The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) was a training grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 2010-13 with a partnership between the NC Institute for Public Health and the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health at the UNC School of Medicine. The project focused on promoting integrative community approaches to optimize mental and physical health among adolescents and women of reproductive age.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how health behaviors result from a complex interaction of factors-biological, cultural, economic and political. • Describe three frameworks that serve as guides for designing and implementing a comprehensive approach to women’s wellness. • Describe how a public health framework may be applied to optimize mental health strategies to improve the health of individuals and populations.

Special Instructions: Note that the WISH modules have been archived on the MCH Navigator website and are all available from a single landing page. To access each module, scroll down the page and click on the drop-down link to see the video.

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.