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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 36 found.

Individual + Policy, System, and Environmental (I+PSE) Conceptual Framework for Action Training Bundle. Year Developed: 2022. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Angie Tagtow, MS, RD; Dena Herman, PhD, MPH, RD; Leslie Cunningham-Sabo, PhD, RDN. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This Training Bundle contains tailored learning opportunities that serve as building blocks to drive Title V MCH transformation by integrating direct service initiatives with policy (organizational/ public), system (simple/complex) and environmental (built/natural) approaches. These materials are centered on the Individual + Policy, System, and Environmental (I+PSE) Conceptual Framework for Action and can support innovative strategies to advance Title V MCH nutrition services and other topical areas. MCH practitioners, whether as individuals or teams, can apply the information provided from online modules, recorded webinars, articles, worksheets, case studies, and reflection to identify, plan, and implement policy, system, and environmental strategies further building Title V MCH capacity, practice-based evidence, and community/population impact.

Learning Objectives: • Define and apply the Individual + Policy, System and Environment (I+PSE) Conceptual Framework for Action to healthy eating and physical activity, food security, and sustainable food systems • Describe outcomes and implications from a childhood obesity prevention action planning application of the I+PSE Conceptual Framework for Action • Critique the evaluation strategies used in healthy eating and active living PSE initiatives using a systematic review

Systems Mapping Video Series. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Jessica Cohen, MSW. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes each.

Annotation: ​​​​​The five minute System Mapping Video S​eries introduces nine system mapping tools in brief 2-5 minute videos. While there are many system m​apping approaches available, this series specifically highlights those approaches that the National MCH Workforce Development Center has found the most useful as Title V (or other public health) leaders work to address wicked system problems. These high-level introductory videos are designed to help learners become familiar with each approach and what a resulting "map" might look like.

Learning Objectives: Understand the components of: • Causal Loop Diagramming • Circle of Care • Concept Mapping • The Five R's • Network Mapping • Process Flow Diagramming • Simulation • System Support Maps • Whole System Mapping

Systems Tools To Support Complex Collaborations During COVID-19. Year Developed: 2020. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Kristen Hassmiller Lich. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 33 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive presentation reviews two systems tools: 1) the 5 R's method,and 2) system support mapping. Both tools represent a systems thinking framework; the presenters also shows how the frameworks can be used in a maternal and child health setting.

Learning Objectives: • Use systems thinking to clarify and strengthen your system in the time of COVID-19. • Practice using two system mapping metrics to guide conversations across stakeholders.

Rural Disparities in Health and Healthcare by Race and Ethnicity. Year Developed: 2020. Source: Rural Health Research Gateway. Presenter(s): Dr. Henning-Smith and Ashley Hernandez, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. direct you tube link

Annotation: Dr. Henning-Smith and Ashley Hernandez, MPH, of the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center present new research on racial and ethnic disparities in health and healthcare among rural residents. Results included differences in county-level premature death by county racial and ethnic composition; individual-level differences in health status by race and ethnicity; and differences in healthcare access and use by race and ethnicity.

Learning Objectives: • Learn county-level differences in mortality • Distinguish individual differences in self-rated health • Describe disparities in access to care

Introduction to Systems Thinking. Year Developed: 2020. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Kristen Hassmill Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 22 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces systems thinking and shows how a better understanding of systems can help public health professionals accomplish their objectives, structure their work, and form partnerships within and outside their organization.

Learning Objectives: • Learn and define the interconnected components of a system. • Explore different examples that illustrate a systems perspective. • Examine a toolbox of systems mapping resources.

Equity, Health Transformation, and Early Childhood Systems Building. Year Developed: 2020. Source: InCK Marks. Presenter(s): Charles Bruner, Kay Johnson, Maxine Hayes, Fan Tait, Wendy Ellis. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar learn about: • The Framework for Child Health Transformation • The Equity Imperative in Health and Early Childhood • Child Health Care and Early Childhood Systems Building

Whole System Mapping in Five Minutes. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Seri Link, Kristen Hassmiller-Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes how to elicit a high-level view of a question (whole systems mapping). The example is figuring out how to begin a collaboration to identify gaps, reduce duplication, and implement policy changes to support care coordination service provision for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN).

Using Systems Biology Based Approaches for Considerations Across the Life Course: Views from Public Health and Preventative Medicine. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Elaine Faustman, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This talk focuses on how public health and preventive medical scientists, as well as developmental and reproductive toxicologists, interpret and apply life course health developmental principles, with an emphasis on the first four principles of the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) framework (Health Development, Unfolding, Complexity, and Timing). The focus of this talk is on early development and childhood.

Learning Objectives: 1. Identifying how systems biology concepts inform public health decisions for improving health development 2. Defining the life course “exposome” taking lessons from a child cohort study 3. Discussing approaches for improving our understanding of within and between human variability across development using evolutionary biology principles 4. Applying ontologies for linking and translating observations across model systems and biomarkers for informing human population research 5. Understanding how integrating systems biology concepts improves our health surveillance and intervention

The Emerging Theoretical Framework of Life Course Health Development. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Neal Halfon, MD, MPH; Christopher Forrest, MD, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, Drs. Halfon and Forrest present the 7 principles that comprise their life course health development framework, including the empirical evidence that underlies each principle and the implications for future research. By shining a light on how early experience conditions future biological responses and influences health development pathways, the presenters hope to encourage theory building and testing, inspire innovative transdisciplinary research, and lead to future discussions that can help to mature the framework into a scientific model with descriptive, explanatory, and predictive utility.

Learning Objectives: • Introduce the Handbook of Life Course Health Development • Describe the emergence and maturation the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) Framework • Develop an understanding of each of the seven LCHD principles

The Circle of Care Framework in Five Minutes. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Seri Link, Kristen Hassmiller-Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes how to survey services needed and available to a clientele population. The example describes systems of care for transition-age youth.

Learning Objectives: • Describe what system-level problems face transition-age youth • Distinguish between supports, services provided and target population within the circle of care

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.