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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 25 found.

Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Health Equity Guide Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Human Impact Partners. Presenter(s): Linda Rae Murray, Rebekah Gowler, Deborah Garneau, Shawna Davie, Matias Valenzuela, Jordan Bingham, Evonda Smith, Sandi Galvez, Rex Archer, Lili Farhang, Andy Wessel, Jeanne Ayers. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 255 minutes.

Annotation: This 4-part webinar series brings together national experts and local health departments to discuss their work to advance health equity. Each webinar focuses on a set of strategic practices that health departments can take to pursue a wall-to-wall transformation of how they work internally, with communities, and alongside other government agencies.

Systems Tools To Support Complex Collaborations During COVID-19. Year Developed: 2020. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Kristen Hassmiller Lich. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 33 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive presentation reviews two systems tools: 1) the 5 R's method,and 2) system support mapping. Both tools represent a systems thinking framework; the presenters also shows how the frameworks can be used in a maternal and child health setting.

Learning Objectives: • Use systems thinking to clarify and strengthen your system in the time of COVID-19. • Practice using two system mapping metrics to guide conversations across stakeholders.

Social Determinants of Health: Technology and Workforce Approaches. Year Developed: 2020. Source: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. Presenter(s): Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, MSc, Rivka Friedman, Alan Gilbert, JD, Kelli Tice Wells, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar explores (1) a national initiative bringing together public health stakeholders to systematically implement and sustain social determinants of health efforts; (2) an innovative federal model testing whether addressing health-related social needs of Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries improves outcomes; and (3) how a health plan is partnering with social workers to help patients with housing, transportation, utilities and more. In addition to the webinar video, an agenda, speaker biographies, and presentation slides are available.

The 5 R's in Five Minutes. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Seri Link, Kristen Hassmiller-Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes the 5 R's: a series of guided questions about roles, relationships, resources, rules, and results. It is illustrated with an example of clarifying the definition, purpose, desired outcome, and target population for care coordination for the children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) population.

New Grantee Orientation: Division of MCH Workforce Development. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Lauren Raskin Ramos, MPH; Laura Kavanagh, MPP; Meredith Morrisette, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; length varies.

Annotation: This webinar presented information to new grantees of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau's (MCHB's) Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWD). Topics included: • Overview of the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). • Overview of the Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWD). • Description of the current DMCHWD investments. • Review of reporting requirements and key deadlines for DMCHWD grantees. • Key cross-cutting resources and communications mechanisms. • An opportunity for targeted Q&A with DMCHWD staff. Previous years' orientations are also available: 2015 https://altarum.adobeconnect.com/_a758956138/dmchwd072315 2014 https://altarum.adobeconnect.com/_a758956138/dmchwd073114

Learning Objectives: • Provide an overview of the organization of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the DMCHWD. • Discuss the Division's programs, goals, and impact. • Review information related to grants administration. • Introduce key resources.

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

SOC Expansion Leadership Learning Community - Collaboration in System of Care Expansion: How Do You Know?. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Waetzig, Beth Strohl & Denise Sulzbach. Type: n.a.. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This session of the System of Care Expansion Leadership Learning Community focuses on collaboration – among and across child-serving system partners; families and youth; and state, community, and tribal jurisdictions. We talk often about why we collaborate (sometimes we are required to) and sometimes we talk about how to do it. The learning community meeting provides an opportunity to talk about whether we are really doing it and how to improve collaboration to achieve system of care expansion goals. Leaders are critical to the process of collaboration, and the strategies shared will help leaders to learn how to assess and improve collaboration in their system of care efforts. The presenter provides space to touch on why and when we collaborate, how we might collaborate better, and how we know that we are working in collaboration to promote complex change in health and human service systems.

Middle Childhood – An Evolutionary Developmental Synthesis. Year Developed: 2017. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Marco Del Giudice, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, Dr. Del Giudice discusses findings from his chapter on middle childhood from the Handbook of Life Course Health Development. Specifically, he reviews the main functions of middle childhood and the cognitive, behavioral, and hormonal processes that characterize this life stage, introduces the idea that the transition to middle childhood works as a switch point in the development of life history strategies, and discusses three insights into the nature of middle childhood.

Policy in Perspective: The Changing Role of Public Health in a Post-ACA Era. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Mathematica Policy Research. Presenter(s): Christopher Trenholm, Judy Bigby. Type: Podcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 6 minutes, 17 seconds.

Annotation: A key role of public health agencies has been to help fill gaps in health care access by providing medical services to the uninsured and underinsured. But with more individuals gaining access to comprehensive coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA), programs focused on providing public medical services can now redirect resources to strengthen their other public health functions. In conjunction with National Public Health Week, this podcast, featuring Mathematica Senior Vice President and Director of Health Research Christopher Trenholm and Senior Fellow Judy Bigby, discusses the changing role of public health programs in an era of health care reform.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.