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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 26 found.

Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Stride toward Equity: Understanding and Interrupting Structural Racism in your Jurisdiction in Order to Improve Health. Year Developed: 2022. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Naomi Thyden, PhD, MPH; Brigette Davis, PhD, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 79 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Davis and Dr. Thyden introduced participants to the various “levels” of racism - with emphasis on the broadest level: structural racism. The presenters discussed their research about structural racism and health and provided examples based on their experience as epidemiologists in state and local public health practice. Participants had a chance to identify structural racism in their own areas of practice and interrogate how it may influence maternal & child health.

Learning Objectives: • Define levels of racism including: discrimination, cultural, institutional and structural racism. • Learn about structural racism • Review learner jurisdictions and its relationship with structural racism

HRSA Women's Health Leadership Series: Women's Mental Health. Year Developed: 2022. Source: Health Resources and Services Administration. Presenter(s): Nancy Mautone-Smith MSW, LCSW; Emily Hassesy MPH, CHES; Joy Burkhard MBA; Cindy Herrick MA, CPSS, MHFA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 59 minutes.

Annotation: As part of the Women's Health Leadership Series, HRSA and SAMHSA hosted a webinar on resources and opportunities around women's mental health, national policy, and stakeholder engagement around maternal mental health care from HRSA-supported settings.

Learning Objectives: • Learn about new HRSA innovations and opportunities • Describe SAMHSA resources for women throughout the life span • Define Serious Mental Illness (SMI) Advisor • Describe the range of maternal mental health disorders including other features and factors

Building Psychological Resilience for the Public Health Workforce during the COVID19 Pandemic. Year Developed: 2021. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mark R. Evces. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 70 minutes.

Annotation: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a second pandemic of stress, anxiety and fear. As public health workers, your work has a unique level of stress during this time. We are best able to maintain our mental health through these difficult times if we stay aware of the effects of stress, take steps to stay mentally healthy, and maintain connections with others. This webinar offers information on awareness, self-care and connection with others so public health workers can develop a plan for maintaining their mental health. Presenters discuss common issues such as coping with fear, anxiety and loss; changing work demands; navigating family relationships; and coping with an uncertain future as the pandemic continues. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the impact of stress and anxiety during traumatic events. • Discuss the importance of staying socially connected during social distancing. • Identify two coping mechanisms for navigating an uncertain future during a pandemic.

Health Equity: Start Where You Are. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Natinonal Institute for Children's Health Quality. Presenter(s): Stacy Scott, PhD, MPA and Elizabeth Coté, MD, MPA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar is designed to support individuals who are pursuing equity within the health care system. It provides: • An overview of health equity and implicit bias, and their impact on children's health, • A modeling exercise to explore how to recognize and address individual implicit bias, and • Resources and guidance to help attendees continue this journey after the webinar.

A Conversation on Ethical Considerations for a Fair and Effective Health Care System. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Chris Feudtner, MD, PhD, MPH; Grace Oei, MD, MA; Chaplain Mark Bartel, M Div, SCC. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 59 minutes.

Annotation: What ethical considerations should guide the design and evaluation of systems of care for children with medical complexity? There are inevitable tradeoffs that any complex health care system must confront when attempting to achieve multiple worthy goals, from benefitting individual patients and families and securing fair distribution of benefits across populations, to operating in a manner that is transparent and free from conflicts of interest. Discussing the article, Ethical Framework for Risk Stratification and Mitigation Programs for Children with Medical Complexity, the panel shared recommendations that help ensure programs for children with medical complexity avoid potentially ethically problematic situations and practices. A video and presentation slides are available.

Protecting Human Subjects and Institutional Review Boards: An Overview. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Justice Research and Statistics Association. Presenter(s): Ross Hickey, JD, CIP, CIPA; George Shaler, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces participants to the basics of institutional review board (IRBs), the need for them and when to submit research protocols for review to an IRB. The webinar, webinar slides, and participant biographies are available.

Learning Objectives: • How do I know if I am doing human subject research? • How does an IRB ensure the rights and welfare of human subjects involved in research are adequately protected? • Participants will learn to "issue spot" where the need for an IRB is likely to arise. • Participants will understand the background and purpose of the relevant human subject research regulations. • Participants will understand how to draft functional IRB protocols and procedures.

Mini-tutorials [on human subjects research]. Year Developed: 2017. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Research Protections. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This series of short tutorials (about 15 minutes each) focus on specific aspects of U. S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) human subjects regulations and policy. They include Institutional Review Board (IRB) review criteria, quorum and voting in IRB meetings; membership requirements for IRBs, prisoner research series, and OHRP reporting requirements.

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages using Moral Foundations Theory. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Gene Matthews; Scott Burris. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Effective messaging of public health challenges and interventions is essential to public health practice and especially to implementing public health laws and policies in a polarized political environment. It is easy for public health leaders to become consumed with the ongoing political and resource shifts taking place in public health and health care. However, it is also clear that those in public health, at all levels, want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with communities of all backgrounds who are burdened by poor health. Using Moral Foundations Theory, the speakers explain how liberals and conservative audiences resonate differently to six intuitive foundational moral values. This session explores crafting messages that embrace all six foundational values so that public health practitioners may engage a broader base of support and develop new community partnerships.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.