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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 21 found. Sorted by

Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Protecting Human Subjects and Institutional Review Boards: An Overview. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Justice Research and Statistics Association. Presenter(s): Ross Hickey, JD, CIP, CIPA; George Shaler, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces participants to the basics of institutional review board (IRBs), the need for them and when to submit research protocols for review to an IRB. The webinar, webinar slides, and participant biographies are available.

Learning Objectives: • How do I know if I am doing human subject research? • How does an IRB ensure the rights and welfare of human subjects involved in research are adequately protected? • Participants will learn to "issue spot" where the need for an IRB is likely to arise. • Participants will understand the background and purpose of the relevant human subject research regulations. • Participants will understand how to draft functional IRB protocols and procedures.

Mini-tutorials [on human subjects research]. Year Developed: 2017. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Research Protections. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This series of short tutorials (about 15 minutes each) focus on specific aspects of U. S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) human subjects regulations and policy. They include Institutional Review Board (IRB) review criteria, quorum and voting in IRB meetings; membership requirements for IRBs, prisoner research series, and OHRP reporting requirements.

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages using Moral Foundations Theory. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Gene Matthews; Scott Burris. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Effective messaging of public health challenges and interventions is essential to public health practice and especially to implementing public health laws and policies in a polarized political environment. It is easy for public health leaders to become consumed with the ongoing political and resource shifts taking place in public health and health care. However, it is also clear that those in public health, at all levels, want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with communities of all backgrounds who are burdened by poor health. Using Moral Foundations Theory, the speakers explain how liberals and conservative audiences resonate differently to six intuitive foundational moral values. This session explores crafting messages that embrace all six foundational values so that public health practitioners may engage a broader base of support and develop new community partnerships.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

The Influence of Character: The Role of Character, Values, and Ethics in Negotiation and Persuasion. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Jack London. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 35 minutes.

Annotation: Character at work and life is vital to success. A reputation for strong character and values helps you succeed in influencing and negotiating. It is difficult to imagine long-term influence without character. Trust and integrity make a person more persuasive in the long-term than false promises and self-serving tactics. This course is led by bestselling author of “Character: The Ultimate Success Factor,” Dr. Jack London, Chairman of the Consolidated Analysis Center, Incorporated (CACI). The course comprises an overview, 4 lessons, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • What is meant by the term character? • Why is character still of primary importance for successful, sustainable nations and organizations? • How does character apply to better negotiating? • The intersection of character, trust, ethics, and leadership.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Public Health Ethics Training Series. Year Developed: 2014. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The "Public Health Ethics" training series is designed to promote the ethical practice of public health by teaching about the ethical principles of public health and by providing resources for creating an ethical climate in public health agencies and schools of public health. This 8 Module series includes the following topics: • 1-Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • 2-Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • 3-The Public Health Code of Ethics • 4-Law and Ethics in Public Health • 5-Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • 6-Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • 7-Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • 8-Responding to Unethical Events

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • Describe the common practice settings from which medical ethics and public health ethics emerge. • Explain “the tyranny of the majority”. • Explain why the medical ethics principle of autonomy does not work as well in public health. Module 2--Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • Explain how a given value or belief from the list is important to public health. Module 3--The Public Health Code of Ethics • Describe how an aspirational code can guide an ethical discussion. • Describe a situation where a given ethical principle applies in public health. • Identify means of creating an ethical environment within public health organizations. Module 4--Law and Ethics in Public Health • Describe three of the several legal powers given to public health. • Describe an ethical principle in public health that is not encoded in public health law. • Describe how the exercise of any power is an ethical issue. Module 5--Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • Provide examples of how concepts of justice are applied to anticipated responses in an influenza pandemic. Module 6--Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • Describe how to recognize an ethical issue. • Describe the elements of a fair process. • Describe the steps of ethical decision-making in a group. Module 7--Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • Identify the facets of human nature and our social environment that are particularly relevant in leading to unethical behaviors in public health. Module 8--Responding to Unethical Events • Describe the range of possible responses to an event that is clearly unethical.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.92 Certificate of Attendance

Leading in Changing Times Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Karen Trierweiler, Valerie Ricker, and Stephanie Wrightsman-Birch. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths (approximately 45 minutes each). AMCHP landing page with additional webinars and resources

Annotation: In working to improve the lives of women, children and families, leadership is an essential role for maternal and child health (MCH) programs. Leaders must have a vision, take initiative, influence people, solve problems, and take responsibility in order to make things happen. And, whether or not they have a formal title, everyone is engaged in the process of leadership. Likewise, everyone can develop their leadership effectiveness. AMCHP’s efforts to strengthen the capacity of the MCH community to engage in the leadership process recognize that leadership development is a process, not an event. The Leading in Changing Times Series is an initiative launched by AMCHP as part of their larger efforts to support a diverse, effective and competent workforce in state and territorial MCH programs. The Leading in Changing Times Series is a year-long, three-part series of webinars blending principles of key leadership theory with real-world stories from senior-level MCH leaders. These 45 minutes leadership “conversations” are designed to share leadership ideas and inspiration through a 20 minute presentation and 25 minute discussion. The three webinars consist of: (1) Great Leaders are Great Decision-Makers: The Importance of Decisiveness; (2) Leading Change: The Challenge of Change; and (3) Leaders with a Vision: The Ability to See Beyond the Present.

Learning Objectives: 1. Great Leaders are Great Decision-Makers: The Importance of Decisiveness • Explore the elements of decision making in public health leadership theory. • Understand the benefits of having a defined approach to prioritizing among many concerns and issues. • Learn concrete strategies and examples that they can use to prioritize maternal and child health efforts in their state. 2. Leading Change: The Challenge of Change • Learn six characteristics of effective change. • Understand the difference between managing and leading change. • Identify opportunities to support or lead change within their organization. • Identify opportunities to practice strategies shared in the webinar. 3. Leaders with a Vision: The Ability to See Beyond the Present • Describe three skills of strategic leadership. • Identify opportunities to create a shared vision within their organization. • Identify opportunities to practice strategies shared in the webinar.

Health Impact Reviews: A Step Toward Health Equity in All Policies. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Christy Hoff, MPH; Sierra Rotakhina, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Representatives from the Washington State Board of Health and Governor's Interagency Council on Health Disparities discuss how they use Health Impact Reviews (HIR) to analyze how proposed legislation or budgetary changes could impact community health. The presentation provides an overview of the HIR framework and methods, a discussion of who can request an HIR, and case examples about bullying and mental health awareness bills. Presenters also discuss their outreach efforts to state legislators and their staff to increase demand for their services.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the health impact review framework and methods. • Outline the types of legislative proposals that make good candidates for a health impact review. • Describe how public health practitioners in every arena can contribute to and benefit from this work.

Good Decision Making in Real Time: Practical Public Health Ethics for Local Health Officials. Year Developed: 2014?. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 114 minutes. Public Health Ethics Training Materials (provides information about facilitator and student manuals, a case repository, accreditation statements, and method of participation)

Annotation: Public health officials regularly balance competing ethical and professional obligations (e.g., efficiently but fairly allocating scarce resources, respecting individual rights while safeguarding the public’s health, protecting underserved and marginalized communities while engaging and sharing information in a transparent manner, and ensuring data confidentiality and individual privacy while conducting surveillance). The field of public health ethics provides a theoretical basis and practical frameworks for addressing challenges that commonly arise in public health practice. Because of the ethical challenges that public health officials face, there is an increasing need to demonstrate competence in public health ethics and an interest in public health ethics training. In order to address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) developed a Web-on-Demand e-Learning module, Good Decision Making in Real Time: Practical Public Health Ethics for Local Health Officials. This training provides public health professionals with tools and practical examples to address ethical challenges that commonly arise in the practice of public health. The 1 hour 54 minute training presents the basics of public health ethics; examines the complementary role that ethics and law play in decision making; and reviews strategies for analyzing ethical issues, exploring the ethical dimensions of alternative courses of action, and justifying public health decisions. The training also presents an interactive case study that puts the learner in the role of a health official and walks through the steps of an ethical analysis using a real-life case scenario. This interactive case study illustrates how to use ethics frameworks, such as the Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health, developed by the Public Health Leadership Society, in the decision making process.

Learning Objectives: • Define the field of public health ethics. • Describe how to use ethical frameworks. • Describe a common public health ethics challenge. • Describe the process of case analysis. • State how public health ethics and law can work together to address ethical challenges and impact decision making. • Describe tools for helping public health officials make ethically informed choices, including illustrating the value of the case study approach. • List specific ways to integrate ethical considerations in the day-to-day decision-making in public health departments. • Promote health improvement, wellness, and disease prevention in cooperation with patients, communities, at-risk populations, and other members of an inter-professional team of health care providers.

Special Instructions: To access this content, register on the NACCHO site, add the chosen sections to your shopping cart (no charge), and use back button to access the content list. It is also available in TRAIN at <https://www.train.org/main/course/1050534/>.

Continuing Education: This course is available for up to 2 hours of CEU credits from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To obtain credit, all sessions must be completed along with the final assessment. Once you have completed viewing all of the sessions, the “Take Assessment” link will open up at the top of the page. For further instruction on obtaining CEU credit or to add the course to the CDC Training Portal for CDC employees, go to https://client.blueskybroadcast.com/naccho/2014/pdf/CE%20Instructions%20-%20Basic.pdf

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.