Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 14 found.

Determining Essential Core Competencies for Job Positions. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Public Health Foundation and Denver Public Health. Presenter(s): Kathleen Amos, MLIS, and Elizabeth Rumbel, MA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes. Presentation slides

Annotation: This archived webinar focuses on determining essential core competencies for job positions within public health organizations. Key to a public health organization’s ability to successfully meet the health needs of its community is having staff whose competencies are well matched to the types of activities they perform in their positions. Job descriptions that detail the competencies, including both skills and knowledge, required for a position are good practice for all organizations seeking to build a competent workforce through successful recruitment, hiring, and professional development, and a required element for health departments seeking accreditation through the Public Health Accreditation Board. The Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (Core Competencies) developed by the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice describe foundational skills desirable for professionals engaging in the practice, education, and research of public health. For any job position, the critical competencies within the Core Competencies will vary depending on the responsibilities and activities of individuals in that position. When developing a job description, it is important to determine which competencies are most essential for that position. During this webinar, a simplified form of the Core Competencies and a process for prioritizing competencies for job descriptions or other workforce development activities was introduced. Through this process, health departments and other public health organizations can engage individuals who are doing the day-to-day work within the organization in identifying the competencies that they feel are most important to being successful in their positions. In addition, Denver Public Health shared how they have used this process to identify essential Core Competencies for positions within their organization and built upon this work to strengthen important skills within their workforce. Discussion among the presenters and participants that occurred during the live version of the webinar is captured in the archive.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Operationalizing the Transformation of the MCH Block Grant. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Michele Lawler, MS, RD; Christopher Dykton; EJ Tom. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate. Length: 170 minutes.

Annotation: This skills‐building session provides state Title V directors and staff with practical information on how to operationalize the transformation of the Title V MCH Services Block Grant, with a focus on the changes impacting the submission of the fiscal year (FY) 2016 application, including the five‐year needs assessment, and FY 2014 annual report. The session focuses on the following areas: 1) new information system for the Title V Information System (TVIS); 2) new guidance for the MCH Block Grant Application Narrative; 3) new guidance for the MCH Block Grant National Performance Measures; and 4) new guidance for other parts of the MCH Block Grant application and annual report.

Developing Evidence About Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN, reviews the importance of collecting standardized data and demonstrates how the information is being used to make the case for public health services. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; Program staff and managers working in environmental health and communicable disease prevention. A recording, slides, and a slides handout are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local health department administrative data can be used to demonstrate the value of public health services. • Describe the need for and value of standardized public health services data for public health performance, advocacy, and building evidence. • Describe opportunities for filling critical gaps in local public health services data.

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink.

The Role and Use of Evidence in Policy. Year Developed: 2013 est.3.. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Feder, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course focuses on how public health professionals can better promote the use of their own work in policy discussions. Participants will explore how evidence is used in policy-making, and how sometimes policy decisions are made despite contrary evidence. The use of evidence may vary, depending upon the political process, so participants will consider several theoretical models of the policy process and what they imply about the use of evidence. This training also addresses how to improve evidence use and the role of knowledge brokers as well as how to frame messages for different audiences.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how evidence is used in policy making. • Identify how the use of evidence in policy making can be improved. • Discover ways in which you can better promote the use of your work in the policy discussions.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Perinatal Performance Measures and Data Collection: Focus on Quality Collaboratives. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Elliot K. Main, MD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 87 minutes. recorded version published April 14, 2014

Annotation: This Webcast discusses perinatal performance measures including identifying and choosing measures, data collection sources, and real-time data feedback systems. It concludes participant questions about how California’s collaboratives have applied these principles to their projects.

Special Instructions: Scroll down the page and click on the webinar to listen to it.

Quality Improvement Quick Guide Tutorial. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation. Presenter(s): Public Health Foundation . Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: The problem solving steps of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PFCA) are the focus of this tutorial. An STI case example is used to explore and frame this model in detail. Quality Improvement in Public Health is defined as well. Optional audio-only, slides-only or video are available to complete the tutorial via the learner’s preference. A knowledge assessment is available for personal evaluation.

Learning Objectives: • Identify quality improvement (QI) tools in the Public Health Foundation’s online resource centers. • List the main problem solving steps of Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA).

Maximizing your Program’s Potential with Continuous Quality Improvement (Capacity Building Webinar 3). Year Developed: 2010. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Grace Gorenflo. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter summarizes the purposes and benefits of continuous quality improvement (CQI). She begins by explaining the process of conducting CQI, and then reviews the PDCA framework, using an example of a home visitation program. She concludes the presentation with a discussion of the differences between CQI and program evaluation. Reference materials are available through links provided in the presentation.

Learning Objectives: • Define CQI. • Describe the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) process. • Understand the difference between quality improvement and evaluation. • Identify 1 - 2 examples of how to apply CQI to a home visitation program.

Continuing Education: CME for non-physicians may receive a certificate of participation; CME for physicians, CNE, and CECH CEUS of 1.5 hours are available; .15 IACET CEUs are available.

Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement Concepts. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation TRAIN National. Presenter(s): Marty Galutia. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: In this short course, Marty Galutia describes quality improvement concepts and how to apply them to improve processes and systems. The presentation reviews the reasons why quality improvement is sought, the process considered broadly, and provides information specific to the Kano Model of Quality. The roles of customers and consumers in QI also are considered. Interactive exercises are built into the presentation throughout.

Special Instructions: Registration to TRAIN is required. After logging in, the course can be accessed by entering the course id (1025091) into the “Search By Course ID” box on the right side of the landing page. On the next page, click on the "Registration" tab and then click on "Launch."

Operationalizing Quality Improvement in Public Health. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): William Riley, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: This online training module explains what quality improvement collaboration is, its importance in public health, and when to utilize it. Dr. Riley focuses on the model for improvement and how to write an AIM statement. Both process and outcome measures are covered as well as how to create a process map. Videos of working sessions attended by public health professionals seeking to apply quality improvement concepts and tools in their work groups are included. Questions and answers follow each of the speaker’s presentations. The module requires a pre and posttest to receive credit.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the meaning and importance of QI collaboration in public health. • Describe the model for improvement in public health. • Write an AIM statement. • Establish both outcome and process measures for QI. • Develop change strategies to achieve improvement in public health. • Create a process map related to an actual public health issue. • Identify and describe appropriate use for QI tools.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required.

Continuing Education: 1.5 Continuing Education Hour is available.

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Five -- Data Collection. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Francoise Grossmann, RN, MPH . Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This session discusses the issues to consider when making decisions about data collection. It surveys the most common data collection methods used in the evaluation of MCH programs.

Learning Objectives: • Identify issues to consider when collecting data for program evaluation. • Describe the strengths and limitations of quantitative and qualitative methods used in program evaluation. • Discuss decision-making issues regarding the selection or design of instruments to measure outcomes. • Apply knowledge to outline a data collection plan for the Child Wellness Program.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance

Next »

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.