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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 11 found.

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part II - The Budget. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: All in the practice of public health know the importance of financial resources to carry out their activities. This very basic introduction course provides a definition of the growing field of public health finance, assists students to develop a working knowledge of the planning cycles in governmental public health organizations, understand how to navigate and use budget planning documents, forecasts, governmental financial statements, and grants to support important public health activities and priorities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance • Describe the Minnesota budget and forecast process • Explore public finance using examples from Minnesota health department s budget • Develop an understanding of financial statements • Understand the basics of grant proposals

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part I - The Business Plan. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: Practitioners in the field of public health find themselves in serious competition for funding. How do we make sure that the activities we advance to protect, maintain and promote the health of the public are a priority for funders. One of the ways we can improve our chances is to make a strong business case for our work. This brief overview will give you a simple outline to assist you in building a business plan for public health activities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance. • Identify three major domains of public health finance competencies (knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in practice). • Describe the financial cycle within organizations. • Explain the reasons for a business plan. • List the major sections of a business plan template.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

Negotiating Skills for Changing Times. Year Developed: 2012?. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Ellen Belzer, MPA. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 117 minutes. expanded description

Annotation: In today’s quickly changing, dynamic, and sometimes volatile health care environment, negotiation skills are more important than ever before. In this course, participants learn how to negotiate better agreements and resolve conflicts more effectively, while developing better inter-professional relationships in the process. Other specific topics include: selecting the best negotiation style, how to use time techniques effectively, ways to uncover the other party’s hidden agenda, how to neutralize emotionalism, the secret to protecting oneself against poor agreements, how framing and anchoring strategies can help get better outcomes, and when and how to make creative solutions, compromises and concessions. A proven six-step negotiation process is central to this course.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the differences between hard, soft, and principled negotiation styles. • Apply strategies to neutralize emotionalism in themselves as well as the other party. • Define and apply the BATNA concept as a protection against poor agreements. • Apply framing strategies in ways that contribute to distributive or integrative outcomes. • Identify the three components of establishing a bargaining range. • Use the six-step negotiation process to reach better agreements and resolve conflicts more effectively, while improving inter-professional relationships. • Identify several mistakes that people commonly make when negotiating at an uneven table. • Know how to utilize power effectively during a negotiation when holding greater or lesser power than the other party. • Identify ways to use power strategies to create a more symmetrical power relationship at the negotiating table and thus achieve better outcomes.

Cultural Competence and Global Leadership. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): David Steffen, PhD, Virginia Suarez, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Direct link

Annotation: The topic of global leadership and cultural competence becomes more important as work increasingly becomes global. This 60-minute slide presentation discusses the definition, key concepts and continuum of cultural competence, as well as the rationale for it and research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. Dr. Steffen discusses the difference between cultural competency and diversity, defining the “four layers” of diversity. Demographic trends within the U.S. and their significance are briefly touched on, as well as recent critical findings on health disparities. Leadership across cultures, Hofstede’s benchmark research, which identified five major dimensions on which cultures differ (Individualism vs Collectivism, Masculinity vs Femininity, Uncertainty Avoidance, Longterm Orientation, and Power Distance), is discussed in detail. Research findings from the GLOBE study are reviewed, in the context of global leadership attributes. The session addresses communication styles from different cultures as well as intercultural conflict styles and strategies to effectively resolve conflict.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency and global leadership. • Understand research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. • Describe several intercultural conflict styles and strategies.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Cultural Competence and Global Leadership” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.”

Business Planning for Public Health Programs. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Stephen Orton, PhD. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This 45-minute module will help you understand the basics of business planning and determine if writing a business plan is appropriate for your public health program.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the parts of a business plan. • Explain how business planning can be helpful for a public health agency or non-profit organization. • Describe the function of business planning. Identify when it is appropriate to do a business plan.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 1 CNE Contact Hour

Building and Maintaining a Collaborative Culture. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): W. Jack Duncan, PhD; Bryn Manzella, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: 120 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: Successful collaborations among public health professionals greatly enhance population health outcomes. This presentation discusses the importance of collaboration within public health, how to build a collaborative culture, and barriers to effective collaboration. Involving key people on a collaborative team is critical for successful collaboration, and this element is also explored. In addition, the presenters review different definitions of collaboration and flush out common themes that can be applied to all. Two interactive case studies are also discussed, in order to offer practical advice for building and maintaining collaborative teams.

Learning Objectives: • Assist in understanding your personal orientation toward collaboration. • Examine common themes among different definitions of collaboration. • Illustrate why collaboration is important. • Identify the steps involved in successful collaboration. • List the elements of a collaborating culture. • Provide a series of factors against which your organization can be evaluated relative to the ease of collaboration. • Identify four familiar impediments to effective collaboration. • Demonstrate why getting the “right” people on the team is important, even critical, to effective collaboration. • Provide a series of guidelines for forming a collaborative team. • Offer some practical advice for building and maintaining collaborative teams.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on "Course Offerings" and search for "Building and Maintaining a Collaborative Culture". [Note: videos may not be compatible with Macs; use Internet Explorer on a PC.]

Managing Conflict in the Workplace. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Tim Keogh, PhD. Type: Video Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 120 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This course has two modules, the first discussing the difference between aggressive and assertive behavior and various behavior styles. The instructor also concentrates on the concept of “style-flexing” and planning for conversation with employees. Module two focuses on arguing, the basics of principled negotiation, managing emotions, and listening with judgment. The course also includes a video vignette case study with corresponding PDF questions, as well as a PDF case study with answers. A multiple choice exam is available to test comprehension of the material.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the 6 keys to managing conflict in the workplace. • List some root causes of workplace conflicts. • Identify the fundamentals of principled negotiations. • Describe the four steps for managing workplace conflict. • List the steps to take when planning for a conversation about conflict. • State the difference between assertive and aggressive behavior. • Explain the value of the “long term relationship” in managing workplace conflict. • Describe how the four style preferences react to conflict. • Explain the techniques of good listening skills for managing workplace conflict.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Managing Conflict in the Workplace.” [Note: videos may not be compatible with Macs].

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

Managing and Motivating Effective Public Health Performance. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): W. Jack Duncan, PhD. Type: Video Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 420 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This learning opportunity is divided into four video modules, and includes PowerPoint handouts as well as a quiz to complete. In the first module, the presenter defines management and the tasks, skills and roles of managers. Module 2 describes the “Mystical Reality of Leadership”: focusing on the four managerial cultures and the evolving views on leadership overtime. Dr. Duncan continues this lecture in Module 3, focusing on different aspects of authority and the leadership triad: knowledge, power and trust. Module 4 concludes with various theories of motivation.

Learning Objectives: Module I - What Management is and What Managers Do: • Define what is meant by the term “management”. • Discuss what is meant by the process or functional approach to management. • Discuss what is meant by the “universality of management functions”. • Discuss what is meant by the “transferability of management skills”. • Describe how the skills required of managers changes as one moves up the organizational hierarchy. • Discuss an approach to management that is based on the roles managers perform. • Describe four “myths” of management. Module II - The Mystical Reality of Leadership: • Provide a definition of leadership. • Discuss the trait and situational views of leadership. • Describe why leadership is so critical to effective change management. • Discuss the differences between leadership and management. • Illustrate the essential aspects of the language of leadership. Module III - The Mystical Reality of Leadership II: • Describe the trust cycle in leadership. • Define authority, power, accountability, and responsibility. • Explain why it is important for authority, power, accountability, and responsibility to be equal. • Describe the formal theory of authority. • Describe the acceptance theory of authority. Module IV - Theories of Motivation: • Compare the needs theories of Maslow, Alderfer, and McClelland. • Discuss the Two-Factor theory of motivation and explain why it involves job enrichment. • Differentiate between horizontal and vertical loading in job enrichment. • Describe why equity is important in considering human motivation. • Discuss Operant Conditioning as a theory of motivation. • Compare and contrast continuous and partial reinforcement schedules.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Managing and Motivating Effective Public Health Performance.”

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

How to Manage Conflict so it Doesn't Manage You. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Dr. Louis Rowitz. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 180 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This video course has eight modules, each related to managing conflict personally. The lecturer first discusses essentials of conflict management, including interpersonal conflict. He goes on to talk about conflict management styles and when to use each method, and further focuses on the conflict resolution process. The next module 7 discusses the turnaround process, and section 8 talks about turf issues between coworkers and how to manage them. A course PowerPoint is available for use as well as a pre and post test to evaluate comprehension.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the benefits of adopting a “conflict manager’s mindset”. • Identify the five predominant styles of conflict management and the situations when each is most appropriate . • Apply strategies to neutralize your own emotions as well as those of others. • Utilize the four-step conflict resolution process to achieve better outcomes to most simple conflicts. • Deal more effectively with complex or difficult conflicts through the use of seven “turnaround strategies.” • Understand the effects of turf battles on the functioning of state health departments. • Apply structural and interpersonal strategies to identify and resolve turf problems within the department. • Describe the three types of integrated effort that are more likely to be achieved when turf issues have been resolved.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “How to Manage Conflict so it Doesn’t Manage You.” [Note: videos may not be compatible with Macs].

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

Contracts. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mary Ralston. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is part of a the New Public Health Administrators Series, a 14 hour-long online program targeted toward new public health administrators and nursing administrators. This course may be taken by itself, or as part of the New Public Health Admin (NPHA) Curriculum.

Learning Objectives: • List three reasons why it is important to put agreements in writing. • Describe the major elements of a contract. • Describe the major guidelines for writing an effective contract. • Describe at least two examples of actual contracts used by local public health.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.