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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 20 found.

Getting Better All the Time: Considerations and Approaches for LSR Searching. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Cochrane Project Transform. Presenter(s): Robin Featherstone, Steve McDonald. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 57 minutes. Slides

Annotation: This webinar describes the living systematic review (LSR) approach to maintaining the currency of systematic reviews of literature by using continual surveillance for new research evidence and inclluding relevant new information in systematic reviews in a timely manner. It also discusses features of the Cochrane LSR search. A video and slides are available.

Dissemination and Implementation Science: What is it and Why is it Critical to Translational Science? . Year Developed: 2018. Source: Clinical Directors Network. Presenter(s): Enola Proctor, PhD, MSW; Stephen Bartels, MD, MS; Laura-Mae Baldwin, MD, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 56 minutes.

Learning Objectives: • Know what dissemination, implementation, implementation science, and dissemination science are. • Understand the features of Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) research studies, and what makes D&I research studies different from usual clinical trials . • Be able to identify funding sources for D&I research.

Special Instructions: Must enter email address to view webinar.

Where To Find MCH Resources: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson and John Richards. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This short presentation discusses the information needs of MCH professionals and identifies distinct online resources to address those needs, from pop and professional sources such as Google, PubMed, and Wikipedia to grant-supported resources that address MCHB topical programs and initiatives. Topics include data warehouses, research centers, epidemiology sites, professional and membership organizations

Learning Objectives: • Identify information needs of professionals • Explain the differences between types of online resources • Differentiate between trusted and questionable online resources • Understand where to go to find additional resources

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region. Presenter(s): Derek Johnson, MLIS. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This introductory webinar provides attendees with a basic definition and framework for evidence-based public health. Special attention is paid to three of the seven steps: Community Assessment, Determining What is Known in the Literature, and Evaluating the Program or Policy. Free resources will be shown that can assist practitioners with these specific steps of the evidence-based public health framework.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe evidence-based public health. • Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question. • Locate and search applicable literature and resources. • Understand the importance of evaluation and locate helpful resources.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Mental Health-Focused Methods and Tools to Support Evidence-Informed Decision Making. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Susan Snelling, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced Introductory. Length: 90 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: This webinar on evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) draws on The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)'s seven-step process, with reference to methods and tools for each step that are specific to mental health practice. The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT) is one of six National Collaborating Centres for Public Health in Canada with a collective mandate to strengthen public health in the country.

Building Evidence to Improve the Structure, Governance and Funding of Local Public Health Through Practice-Based Research Networks . Year Developed: 2015. Source: n.a.. Presenter(s): Justeen Hyde and Jennifer Kertanis. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 50 minutes. TRAIN Link

Annotation: Are there better ways to organize, finance and deliver local public health services? Join us for a presentation of “real world” studies of local health departments in states of Connecticut and Massachusetts, two states with highly decentralized public health systems, that explore just that question. Learn about how practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are bringing together researchers and practitioners across the nation to identify strategies that work to maximize population health impact, cost effectiveness and health equity of public health systems.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the primary objectives of Public Health Systems and Services Research. • List at least three reasons why local health departments should be interested in the work of PBRNs. • Recognize how findings from CT and MA PBRN studies could be used to impact. • Recall how local health departments can learn more about PBRN research or participate in PBRN studies.

Continuing Education: NEPHTC Certificate

Breaking Down Infant Mortality: Achieving Measureable Impact through the CoIIN Approach. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elaine Fitzgerald, DrPH, MIA; Ellen Pliska, MHS, CPH; Vanessa Lee, MPH. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop presented a framework developed by the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality (NICHQ) for MCH leaders to use in determining their strategic priorities for reducing infant mortality. The Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality is a multiyear, national program to save babies’ lives through quality improvement, collaborative learning and collaborative innovation. The CoIIN framework is a tool that enables states, MCH officials and all stakeholders to break down the complex, multifaceted issue of infant mortality into practical, achievable steps for improvement – first, by organizing actions by periods of engagement and then by specific strategies.

Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions for New Populations and Settings. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rachel C. Shelton, ScD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. TRAIN.org link

Annotation: Dissemination and implementation sciences are defined as the systematic study of how a specific set of activities and designated strategies are used to successfully adopt and integrate an evidence-based public health intervention (EBI) within specific settings, and are comprised of four steps: 1) exploration, 2) adoption/preparation, 3) implementation, and 4) sustainment. The overall goal is to reduce the gap between science and practice/policy. Implementation research speaks more to processes and factors associated with successful integration of EBIs within a particular setting, while dissemination research focuses on the processes and factors that lead to widespread adoption and use of EBIs. EBIs are shaped by research evidence, resources, population, and context, and are popularly used due to their demonstrated effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and fast process. In order to successfully select an EBI, interventionists must Identify community needs, assess organizational capacity, and search program registries to select a program. When preparing for implementation, and EBI can either be adopted as is or adapted to fit the local conditions. Adaptation is an important part of the process in order to enhance engagement, reach the audience, address disparities, increase fit and relevance, and reinforce the message. Adaptations can be either surface or deep structure, and the use of either or both should be a conscious, well thought out decision. Surface adaptations use visual and auditory cues for culturally appropriate messages, while deep structure adaptations involves cultural sensitivity and comprehensive understanding of ethnic group’s core cultural values, norms, and stressors (economic, social, environmental) affecting health behaviors. Models for guiding adaptation include Card, ADAPT-ITT, and MAP.

Continuing Education: 1 CHES; 1 CPHCE

A Public Health with Impact: The Path to What Works. Year Developed: 2014 est.. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): Brandie Adams-Piphus, MPH. Type: Podcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 12 minutes.

Annotation: Brandie Adams-Piphus, MPH, NACCHO Senior Program Analyst, describes the role of the health department in advancing evidence-based public health and helpful resources. This podcast increases local health officials' awareness of their role in using evidence-based public health practice to prevent chronic disease and keep people healthier.

Learning Objectives: • Define evidence-based public health and the role of the LHO in evidence-based public health. • Describe how NACCHO’s Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Planning can help you carry out your role in evidence-based public health. • Utilize tools and resources that can help you put NACCHO’s Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Planning into practice.

Understanding Evidence. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Violence Prevention. Presenter(s): N/A. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Using a combination of graphics, polls and expert interviews, CDC presents “Understanding Evidence” in four short modules. The introduction explains a basic decision-making framework using three types of evidence. Module 2, “Best Available Research Evidence” offers tips for finding evidence in the research literature and then determining whether that information has been appropriately tested. “Experiential Evidence” (Module 3) helps users understand how they can gather information about real-world experiences from others in the field or community. In the final module, entitled “Contextual Evidence,” practitioners are asked to think of specific details related to a project to help them decide if an evidence-based program will work in a given setting. In addition to the four training modules, this website features case studies, a glossary of definitions and a “Resource Center” with information specific to each element of a comprehensive “continuum of evidence”. While prepared specifically for those working in the field of violence prevention, content presented is applicable to a wide range of MCH issues and interventions.

Continuing Education: CE credits granted (free) by CDC upon completion by registered learners of all four modules. Screen will appear for submission of your request.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.