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Health Equity Guide Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Human Impact Partners. Presenter(s): Linda Rae Murray, Rebekah Gowler, Deborah Garneau, Shawna Davie, Matias Valenzuela, Jordan Bingham, Evonda Smith, Sandi Galvez, Rex Archer, Lili Farhang, Andy Wessel, Jeanne Ayers. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: 255 minutes.

Annotation: This 4-part webinar series brings together national experts and local health departments to discuss their work to advance health equity. Each webinar focuses on a set of strategic practices that health departments can take to pursue a wall-to-wall transformation of how they work internally, with communities, and alongside other government agencies.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Build Power for Health Equity: Strategic Practices for Local Health Departments. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Dialogue4Health. Presenter(s): Renee Canady, PhD; Jacques Colon; Sarah Hernandez, Jonathan Heller, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar describes a set of “inside” and “outside” strategic practices that public local health departments can use to advance equity. The panelists provide concrete examples of how they have implemented these practices, their lessons learned, and their practical guidance to local health department staff interested in tackling similar efforts. Specific practices such as hiring and contracting, staff training, partnering with community organizing groups, and using Health in All Policies are covered during this training. Broader themes to be discussed include confronting the root causes of inequity and supporting leadership and innovation to advance equity.

Consumer Advisory Committees: Recruiting, Training, and Retaining Members for Engagement. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Resources for Integrated Care. Presenter(s): Jacqueline Dowdy; Serena Simeone; Margo Michaels; Rosa Palacios (Moderator) . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 71 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar is intended for health plan representatives, consumers, and advocates seeking to help the voices of older adults, persons with disabilities, and their caregivers be heard in the design, implementation, and oversight of health plans working to improve and integrate care for their enrollees. Recruitment is one of the first and most critical steps for a delivery system to take when creating a consumer advisory committee for its enrollees. Finding the right people to participate, and keeping them engaged for a year or more, can present significant challenges and costs that must be anticipated. Additionally, training Medicare, Medicaid, or dually-eligible enrollees and their caregivers for engagement is vital to the success of the consumer advisory committee. This webinar also addresses enrollee education to develop an informed and strong consumer voice, enrollee understanding of the purpose and promise of meaningful engagement, and the available resources to assist enrollees in their new roles. This webinar focuses on the best practices to recruit, train, and retain a diverse group of consumers and caregivers who have the capacity, skills, time and desire to regularly attend and meaningfully engage in a delivery system’s consumer advisory committee. The webinar outlines how to create a training curriculum that on-boards consumers and caregivers – no matter what their abilities, disabilities, strengths or weaknesses – to work together and be effective. The webinar also includes a consumer who has been involved on an advisory committee to offer personal insights on how to motivate and support members. This webinar contains useful information for Medicaid MCOs, PIHPs, PAHPs in meeting the member advisory committee requirements (§438.110) of the Medicaid managed care rule, as well as for MMPs in also meeting requirements in the three-way contracts. A video and slides are available.

Partnering in the Title V Block Grant Process. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Nora Wells, Lisa Maynes, Pip Marks, Joni Bruce, Diana Autin. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 64 minutes. List of training webinars

Annotation: Title V needs family involvement to strengthen the Block Grant. In this webinar, a panel of family leaders from three states--California, Oklahoma, and Vermont--shared their organizations' involvement in the Block Grant process and detail their paths to partnership with their state Title V, sharing tips and lessons learned along the way for building this important relationship. The list of training webinars provides a link to the slides and 5 handouts for this presentation.

Engagement of Family Leader Organizations in Non-CSHCN Initiatives. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Malia Corde, Amy Nienhuis, Jane St. John, Susan Bird. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 53 minutes.

Annotation: Family involvement is essential to the successful development and adoption of health-related programs that affect families. Family engagement is now being measured across MCH systems and not just within programs for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Family organizations serving families of CSHCN are already actively engaged in partnerships around how to promote family engagement in health care beyond CSHCN populations. This webinar was a panel presentation of three Family to Family Health Information Centers (F2Fs) and Family Voices State Affiliate Organizations (FV SAOs) highlighting examples and lessons learned from their successful partnerships and collaborations on Non-CSHCN initiatives. Speakers: Malia Corde of New Jersey's Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) will highlight three projects, funded through the NJ Department of Health and NJ Department of Human Services, that focus on improving pregnancy outcomes and the prevention of birth defects and developmental disabilities. Amy Nienhuis of Family Connection in South Carolina will discuss elements of her organization's state contract with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control that reach beyond CSHCN populations. Jane St. John and Susan Bird of Missouri Family to Family will highlight an evolution of partnerships with stakeholders including Missouri's Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems and Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting which have resulted in increased family involvement in several initiatives across the state.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Community Balanced Scorecards for Collaborative Public Health Strategies. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Epstein & Fass Associates and Insight Formation. Presenter(s): Paul Epstein and Bill Barberg. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 74 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar provides public health practitioners with an introduction to Community Balanced Scorecards and explains how this system can build on standards-based assessments, accreditation, MAPP, and QI to assure a strategic focus on health outcomes. Participants learn the power of “strategy mapping” for developing strategy and communicating roles and purpose among collaborators, and how to manage objectives, projects, and performance data in a collaborative environment. They also learn how to use data from assessments or accreditation and use CBSC to select the most strategic quality improvement initiatives. Resources presented for next steps include readings and training available. It also describes an innovative pilot project for local public health organizations combining CBSC with supportive technology and training to build systemic improvement. The pilot project was started shortly after the live version of this webinar was presented, and applications for it are closed. One of the biggest challenges for local public health organizations is how to manage collaborations across organizations, sectors, or jurisdictions that are essential to improving community health. The Community Balanced Scorecard (CBSC) is a collaborative, community-focused version of the Balanced Scorecard, the popular strategy management tool that has been successfully applied in the government, non-profit, and corporate worlds for over 15 years. CBSCs enable public health organizations to manage the complexity of collaborative initiatives while keeping all partners focused on achieving the ultimate goal: measurable, sustainable improvements in community health.

Special Instructions: Requires free registration

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.