Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 10 found. Sorted by

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region. Presenter(s): Derek Johnson, MLIS. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This introductory webinar provides attendees with a basic definition and framework for evidence-based public health. Special attention is paid to three of the seven steps: Community Assessment, Determining What is Known in the Literature, and Evaluating the Program or Policy. Free resources will be shown that can assist practitioners with these specific steps of the evidence-based public health framework.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe evidence-based public health. • Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question. • Locate and search applicable literature and resources. • Understand the importance of evaluation and locate helpful resources.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Build Power for Health Equity: Strategic Practices for Local Health Departments. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Dialogue4Health. Presenter(s): Renee Canady, PhD; Jacques Colon; Sarah Hernandez, Jonathan Heller, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar describes a set of “inside” and “outside” strategic practices that public local health departments can use to advance equity. The panelists provide concrete examples of how they have implemented these practices, their lessons learned, and their practical guidance to local health department staff interested in tackling similar efforts. Specific practices such as hiring and contracting, staff training, partnering with community organizing groups, and using Health in All Policies are covered during this training. Broader themes to be discussed include confronting the root causes of inequity and supporting leadership and innovation to advance equity.

Diverting to Treatment: Community Policing and Supporting Youth with Mental Health Needs. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The November 2016 Knowledge Network for Systems of Care TV (KSOC-TV) webcast highlights the changing role of law enforcement in supporting youth and young adults with mental health needs. The program included evidence-based strategies to combine efforts of police officers, mental health educators, and community advocates to resolve potentially volatile situations in more positive ways.

Engagement of Family Leader Organizations in Non-CSHCN Initiatives. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Malia Corde, Amy Nienhuis, Jane St. John, Susan Bird. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 53 minutes.

Annotation: Family involvement is essential to the successful development and adoption of health-related programs that affect families. Family engagement is now being measured across MCH systems and not just within programs for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Family organizations serving families of CSHCN are already actively engaged in partnerships around how to promote family engagement in health care beyond CSHCN populations. This webinar was a panel presentation of three Family to Family Health Information Centers (F2Fs) and Family Voices State Affiliate Organizations (FV SAOs) highlighting examples and lessons learned from their successful partnerships and collaborations on Non-CSHCN initiatives. Speakers: Malia Corde of New Jersey's Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) will highlight three projects, funded through the NJ Department of Health and NJ Department of Human Services, that focus on improving pregnancy outcomes and the prevention of birth defects and developmental disabilities. Amy Nienhuis of Family Connection in South Carolina will discuss elements of her organization's state contract with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control that reach beyond CSHCN populations. Jane St. John and Susan Bird of Missouri Family to Family will highlight an evolution of partnerships with stakeholders including Missouri's Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems and Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting which have resulted in increased family involvement in several initiatives across the state.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

The Potentially Transformative Effect of Measuring the Health of a Community (Research to Reality). Year Developed: 2012. Source: National Cancer Institute, Office of Communications and Education. Presenter(s): Kurt Stange, MD, PhD; Terry Allan, MPH; Paul Jarris, MD, MBA. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online seminar explains how the functional health, and the social, environmental, behavioral and health care determinants of a community can be measured and reported, thus engaging and empowering multiple stakeholders – both individual and groups – to take responsibility for working together to improve health, its determinants and equity. It explores tools and resources, such as the County Health Rankings, to measure the health of a community and ways that have the potential to stimulate multistakeholder engagement, and to serve as a focus for ongoing efforts to improve community health and health equity. Dr. Kurt Stange highlights models of how measuring the health of a community and how this knowledge, generated and followed over time, can empower multi-stakeholder groups to take responsibility for working together to improve health, its determinants, and equity. Terry Allen and Paul Jarris join the seminar to share their experiences in working across sectors to measuring community health at the local and national levels, and will engage participants in sharing their experiences and lessons learned, and thoughts on how other communities can use this approach to improve health and equity.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the opportunities for measuring community health and models to do so at both the local and national level. • Discuss how measuring the health of a community, and the knowledge generated, can help to empower multi-stakeholder groups to work together. • Share their experiences in measuring community health and engaging multi-stakeholders.

Community Balanced Scorecards for Collaborative Public Health Strategies. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Epstein & Fass Associates and Insight Formation. Presenter(s): Paul Epstein and Bill Barberg. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 74 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar provides public health practitioners with an introduction to Community Balanced Scorecards and explains how this system can build on standards-based assessments, accreditation, MAPP, and QI to assure a strategic focus on health outcomes. Participants learn the power of “strategy mapping” for developing strategy and communicating roles and purpose among collaborators, and how to manage objectives, projects, and performance data in a collaborative environment. They also learn how to use data from assessments or accreditation and use CBSC to select the most strategic quality improvement initiatives. Resources presented for next steps include readings and training available. It also describes an innovative pilot project for local public health organizations combining CBSC with supportive technology and training to build systemic improvement. The pilot project was started shortly after the live version of this webinar was presented, and applications for it are closed. One of the biggest challenges for local public health organizations is how to manage collaborations across organizations, sectors, or jurisdictions that are essential to improving community health. The Community Balanced Scorecard (CBSC) is a collaborative, community-focused version of the Balanced Scorecard, the popular strategy management tool that has been successfully applied in the government, non-profit, and corporate worlds for over 15 years. CBSCs enable public health organizations to manage the complexity of collaborative initiatives while keeping all partners focused on achieving the ultimate goal: measurable, sustainable improvements in community health.

Special Instructions: Requires free registration

Maximizing Community Stakeholders' Engagement. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Tom Wolff, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 35 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar explores the topic of community and stakeholder engagement, partnership, and issues of measurement. Participants are provided tools for working with communities and best practices on how to increase community engagement in MCH populations.

Effect of Disasters on Mental Health for Children and Adolescents . Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In addition to providing general knowledge of how disaster trauma effects this particular population, this course emphasizes practical skills: administering psychological first aid to children and adolescents in the immediate aftermath of a disaster, screening them for mental health disorders in the months that follow, and involving parents and other caregivers throughout the process. This course covers the following topics: 1. Risk Factors 2. Psychological First Aid for Children and Adolescents 3. What Parents Can Do to Help 4. Common Reactions of Children and Adolescents to Traumatic Stress 5. Pathological Reactions of Children and Adolescents to Traumatic Stress 6. Treatment Options

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the risk factors involved for a child or adolescent developing mental health problems as a result of exposure to disaster. • Recognize symptoms of acute psychological distress in children or adolescents. • Administer “psychological first aid” to children and adolescents to provide them with stabilization during and in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event. • Describe how 4 major components in the psycho-physiological response to trauma (somatic, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive) manifest themselves in pre-school children, older children, and adolescents. • Advise parents/caregivers what they do to help prevent their child or adolescent from developing mental health problems after a traumatic event. • Distinguish between a normal and pathological reaction to disaster trauma in children and adolescents. • Discuss treatment options for children and adolescents who develop mental health disorders.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Culture and Health Literacy: Case Studies in Culture and Health Literacy. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Three local efforts to address the health literacy gap in Minnesota are discussed. These include: the ECHO Project (Emergency Preparedness with Cultural Communities), PhotoVoice, and the Urban Health Agenda Community Advisory Committee (UHACAC). These projects represent cutting-edge work related to health literacy targeting cultural groups.

Learning Objectives: • Identify innovative strategies that can improve health literacy among cultural groups. • Discuss successes and challenges in designing and implementing strategies to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • Describe what other communities are doing to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • List what steps can be taken to stimulate further discussion on this topic.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE

New Search

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.