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Innovations in Patient Engagement to Improve Patient Safety in Primary Care. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Clinical Directors Network. Presenter(s): Kelly M. Smith, PhD; Kelley M. Baker, MA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This series of webinars includes the following: Be Prepared to Be Engaged (June 6, 2018) Create a Safe Medicine List Together (June 21, 2018) Teach-Back (August 1, 2018) Warm Handoff Plus (August 9, 2018)0

Learning Objectives: • Review the key threats to patient safety in primary care settings and interventions to engage patients and families to improve safety. • Describe the role and value of each innovation in improving patient safety. • Identify strategies for implementing each innovation in primary care settings.

Special Instructions: Must enter email address to view webinar.

Implementation Brief: Family-Professional Partnerships. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced. Podcast

Annotation: This training brief provides specific learning opportunities and resources for use by the Title V workforce that focus on how to implement and execute skills associated with family-professional partnerships.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

Protecting Human Subjects and Institutional Review Boards: An Overview. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Justice Research and Statistics Association. Presenter(s): Ross Hickey, JD, CIP, CIPA; George Shaler, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces participants to the basics of institutional review board (IRBs), the need for them and when to submit research protocols for review to an IRB. The webinar, webinar slides, and participant biographies are available.

Learning Objectives: • How do I know if I am doing human subject research? • How does an IRB ensure the rights and welfare of human subjects involved in research are adequately protected? • Participants will learn to "issue spot" where the need for an IRB is likely to arise. • Participants will understand the background and purpose of the relevant human subject research regulations. • Participants will understand how to draft functional IRB protocols and procedures.

Evaluation Learning Bundle. Year Developed: 2017. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson, PhD; John Richards, MA, AITP. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This learning bundle uses the CDC framework as a conceptual model to organize learning opportunities. It presents introductions to the six steps of program evaluation in short video podcasts. You can also download materials from the CDC about each step. After reviewing the introductory material, you can access additional learning opportunities to gain knowledge and skills related to each step of the framework. For additional resources this learning bundle also includes an Evaluation Toolkit developed by NCEMCH that includes an evaluation primer, a collection of key resources, and an interactive Choose-and-Use tool to assist users in finding instructions on how to conduct evaluations and examples of successful evaluations from the field.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

CityMatCH Well-Woman Project Learning Network Webinar. Year Developed: 2017. Source: CityMatCH and University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Arden Handler. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 70 minutes.

Annotation: The Well-Woman Project aims to elevate women’s voices about what makes them healthy and able to receive well-woman care within their context of their lives, neighborhoods and cities.

VENA [Value Enhanced Nutrition Assessment]: Connecting the Dots Between Assessment and Intervention. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, WIC Works. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes. Related trainings

Annotation: This Web-based course provides continuing education and resources that can be accessed by any WIC staff member. There are 4 lessons in this course: VENA and Participant-Centered Services (PCS), Engaging Participants in Education and Counseling, Path to Participant Success: Food Packages and Referrals, and Establishing Goals and Following Up. Acknowledgement is given to the many WIC State Agencies whose work in supporting VENA and PCS contributed to this course including: California, Chickasaw Nation, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the purpose and goals of VENA. • Discuss what it means to provide Participant-Centered Services (PCS). • Identify several strategies to enhance counseling and educational sessions. • Describe how to tailor food packages for participants. • Describe how to effectively make referrals.

Continuing Education: This course is approved for CPEUs by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. This continuing education activity was approved by the Maryland Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. CEU expires 3/22/2018 for nurses and 1/1/2019 for dietitians.

Listening Before We Speak: Understanding Our Audience in Times of Disaster #SomosSocial . Year Developed: 2016. Source: Federal Emergency Management Agency, Digitalgov. Presenter(s): Daniel Llargues, Lucia Castro Herrera. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Who is the audience? What is the social conversation? Those are the most common questions that tools like social listening can address to better understand your audience and their needs. Listening to the needs and concerns of your audience, and understanding how they use social media ultimately helps drive more informed content strategy and better allows us to be a part of the conversation. In times of disaster, the specific needs and ways to communicate with English speaking communities and Spanish speaking communities sometimes are different and often confused. In this webinar we will share our experience implementing social listening as a tool directed to our Spanish speaking audience and how to partner with other reliable sources to provide relevant content at every stage of the disaster. In addition, we will share lessons learned and best practices about our engagement. The webinar is aimed at: Anyone interested in social listening for Spanish speaking markets in the United States Digital and social media managers with content responsibilities in Spanish Anyone interested in social media, disasters and communications with limited English proficiency communities

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.