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Displaying records 1 through 4 of 4 found.

CBPR: A Partnership Approach for Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 6.5 hours.

Annotation: Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a partnership approach to research that equitably involves community members, organization representatives, and academic researchers in all aspects of the research process. This course was originally released in 2009. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: • List the rationale, definition, and core principles of CBPR (CHES Area of Responsibility 4.2.7). • Describe strategies for forming, maintaining, sustaining, and evaluating CBPR partnerships (2.1.3, 4.7.2). • Discuss qualitative and quantitative data collection methods and interpretation (4.2.6). • Explain methods of dissemination and translation of research findings (4.6.8, 4.7.1, 4.7.5). • Identify benefits, challenges, and recommendations for using CBPR for research and social change (4.2.7).

Continuing Education: 605 Nursing Contact Hours (expires March 31, 2019); 6.5 CHES Category 1 CECH, Certificate of completion; $21 charge for CE credits

Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Yale University. Presenter(s): Leslie Curry, PhD, MPH. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This six module series of lectures from Yale University introduces the learner to the qualitative reseearch. The course creators say: Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including (1) what is qualitative research; (2) developing a qualitative research question; how to use the most common methods, (3) in-depth interviews and (4) focus groups; (5) data analysis; and (6) scientific rigor. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences.

Public Health Learning Modules. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-Paced.

Annotation: Public Health Learning Modules are a teaching tool to advance knowledge of policy initiatives, existing and emerging research, and transformative models. They contain video lectures, slide presentations, student assessments, in-class activities and resources. The following 15 modules follow the framework of Healthy People 2020, the science-based 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans: Module 1--Advancing Healthy People 2020: Learning and Practice Module 2--The Legal Infrastructure of Public Health Module 3--Social Determinants of Health: a Lens for Public Health Module 4--Emergencies: Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery Module 5--Tobacco Use: Prevention, Cessation and Policy Module 6--Substance Use: Addressing Addiction and Emerging Issues Module 7--Mental Health: A Systems Approach Module 8--Access to Health Services: Multiple Perspectives Module 9--Healthcare Associated Infections Across the Spectrum of Care Module 10--Health Information Technology: Using Data to Inform Practice Module 11--Food: Obesity, Access and Ongoing Issues Module 12--Injury Prevention: Targeting Teen Driving Module 13--Using Policy and Best Practices in Maternal, Infant and Child Health: Maternity Care Coalition Module 14--Using Best Practices to Provide Health Services to the LGBT Population: The Mazzoni Center Module 15--Oral Health Across the Lifespan Module 16--Public Health Infrastructure in the United States: An Integrated System Module 17--Environmental Health: Issues and Impact Last Module--Bringing it All Together: Healthy People 2020 in the Classroom and Beyond

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Advancing Health People 2020: Learning and Practice • Introduce the Healthy People 2020 Learning Modules project. • Define the overarching goals of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. • Describe the available data to track progress related to Healthy People objectives. • Explain the modules format and how Healthy People can more effectively be integrated into public health education. Module 2--The Legal Infrastructure of Public Health • Understand the importance of law in the Public Health infrastructure. • Integrate law and Public Health systems research and practice. • Recognize infrastructural Public Health law at work. Module 3--Social Determinants of Health: a Lens for Public Health • Understand the overarching framework of the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and how they are woven throughout all of the topic areas of Healthy People 2020. • Identify the five domains of SDOH within Healthy People 2020. • Explore the impact of SDOH on population health through practical application. Module 4--Emergencies: Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery • Describe the history of emergencies and their influence on prevention activities. • Evaluate methods for preparing for emergencies at the individual, community, and governmental levels. • Describe the process for emergency response for different scales/types of emergencies citing specific examples. • Assess the emergency recovery process and the challenges therein for different types of emergencies. Module 5--Tobacco Use: Prevention, Cessation and Policy • Improve knowledge of policy and program applications to influence tobacco screening and cessation assessment, advice, and counseling in health care settings involving traditional and emerging tobacco products. • Increase knowledge and policy applications to improve indoor (and outdoor) smoke-free laws in a variety of settings. • Expand knowledge and applications for the development of increasing federal, state, and local taxes on tobacco products to reduce tobacco consumption. Module 6--Substance Use: Addressing Addiction and Emerging Issues • Increase knowledge of prevalence, challenges and opportunities for addressing current substance abuse problems through policy and preventive programs. • Improve knowledge of the prevalence, issues, challenges and opportunities for reducing the prevalence of underage drinking and driving in the US through current policies and preventive programs. •Improve knowledge of the prevalence, challenges and opportunities for reducing prescription drug abuse through current policies and preventive programs. Module 7--Mental Health: A Systems Approach Coming Soon... Module 8--Access to Health Services: Multiple Perspectives • Understand how access to care is defined. • Describe barriers to access. • Identify and describe the components of the safety net. Module 9--Healthcare Associated Infections Across the Spectrum of Care • Understand the burden and nature of healthcare-associated infections across the spectrum of care. • Discuss prevention strategies that are effective across the spectrum of care. • Review the epidemiology associated with the most common hospital-associated infections. • Examine the causes of healthcare-associated infections in long-term care facilities. • Identify the risk for healthcare-associated infections in ambulatory care settings. Module 10--Health Information Technology: Using Data to Inform Practice • Introduce the topic of Health Information Technology. • Review the primary uses of Health Information Technology in practice. • Describe the use of Health Information Technology as it impacts population health. Module 11--Food: Obesity, Access and Ongoing Issues • Understand connections between the built environment and health. • Review current recommendations, practices and progress in the field working to provide access to affordable nutritious food. • Examine current research on food access strategies and health promotion. • Describe the process of engaging stakeholders and stimulate policy change. Module 12--Injury Prevention: Targeting Teen Driving • Introduce the topic of injury prevention, focusing on teen driving crashes. • Discuss data sources to evaluate the magnitude of the issue and success of interventions. • Explain existing policy interventions. • Describe the specific example of New Jersey’s teen driver policy. Module 13--Using Policy and Best Practices in Maternal, Infant and Child Health: Maternity Care Coalition • Describe the utility of a multi-faceted approach to address maternal, infant and child health issues. • Identify policy approaches to public health issues being addressed by • Community Based Organizations. • Describe the components of a multi-tiered breastfeeding promotion initiative. Module 14--Using Best Practices to Provide Health Services to the LGBT Popualtion: The Mazzoni Center • Describe cultural competence as it relates to LGBT health services. • Identify key policy issues in the LGBT population. • Describe the components of culturally competent LGBT services. Module 15--Bringing it All Together: Healthy People 2020 in the Classroom and Beyond • Describe the various ways public health officials use Healthy People 2020 in the municipal public health system. • Identify at least two opportunities to demonstrate knowledge and use of Healthy People 2020 in ongoing and future work.

Continuing Education: Each module has continuing education credits; the courses expire 12/1/2017

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.