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Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

Evidence-Based Public Health Training Series. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Advanced. Length: 555 minutes.

Annotation: Today's public health professionals must be able to strategically consider research results, political interests, and community requests when leading program and policy work. The evidence-based public health framework is an effective model for this type of decision-making. The Evidence-Based Public Health Training Series consists of nine modules that cover core concepts, such as defining public health issues, conducting community assessments, prioritizing options, and evaluating program and policy impacts. You may take each of the modules individually and receive a certificate for each one. If you choose to complete all nine modules, you will also receive a certificate for the series as a whole. Each module consists of several videos, followed by a short quiz. You must watch the videos and take the quiz in order to pass the module. To aid in your understanding, optional activities and questions for reflection or discussion are also included with each module. You may discuss these questions in a forum with other module participants or with peers or colleagues, or you may reflect on them individually.

Special Instructions: Must create a PH Learn Link account to view.

Population Health Management: Improving Health Where We Live, Work, and Play. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Diabetes Education Program. Presenter(s): Ron Loeppke, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FACPM; Jeanette May, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Transcript

Annotation: This webcast discusses how a population health management approach considers health quality and costs beyond the clinical setting to integrate health information, management, and support into people's daily lives at a time when health care costs are rising and overall health and well-being are declining.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the social, economic, and physical environmental factors that contribute to health. • Find out how employers and communities can work together to control health care spending plus have a positive influence on health outcomes. • Hear how new technologies can be used for patient engagement, education, and management. • Tap into resources for enhancing health management in the workplace, in the home, and in time off.

Medicaid and CHIP Fundamentals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Health Policy Forum. Presenter(s): Chris L. Peterson, MPP. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 51 minutes.

Annotation: This lecture covers the background of the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, explains how Medicaid and CHIP work independently and together. Topic covered include the statutory and program administration of the program (what are the federal and state roles), eligibility (who is covered), benefits and cost sharing (what is covered), and payment and financing issues (how much is covered). The lecture concludes with selected, real-life policy issues.

Learning Objectives:

Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series. Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. The series consists of the following 6 Modules: • Introduction to an Integrated Approach • Defining the Challenge • Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach • Developing Evidence-Based Programs • Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement • Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Introduction to an Integrated Approach • Define the target audience for the WISH Orientation Training Series. • Discuss the rationale for an integrated approach to women's health and wellness. • List examples of national trends towards integrated, outcome-oriented approaches. • Describe the frameworks that serve as guides to a comprehensive approach to promoting women's health. Module 2--Defining the Challenge • Describe epidemiologic data for women of childbearing age related to mental health, substance abuse, violence and injury, and chronic disease. • Discuss the inter-relationship of these issues as they impact women’s health. Module 3--Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach • Describe how health behaviors result from a complex interaction of factors-biological, cultural, economic and political. • Describe three frameworks that serve as guides for designing and implementing a comprehensive approach to women’s wellness. • Describe how a public health framework may be applied to optimize mental health strategies to improve the health of individuals and populations. Module 4--Developing Evidence-Based Programs • Define evidence-based practices and policies and potential impact on public health programs. • Define levels of evidence. • Describe two sources of evidence-based programs. • Describe the role of policy in improving integration of care Identify mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating programs and policies. Module 5--Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement • Recognize the importance of building partnerships and supporting community engagement to integrate care for women’s wellness. • Outline the basic guidelines and steps for developing partnerships and engaging the community. • Describe the Collective Impact Approach and its key concepts. Module 6--Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach • Describe how various components such as evidence-based practice, a public health approach and partnership come together to form an integrated approach to women’s health issues. • Cite 3 examples of how an integrated approach made an impact in real life situations. • Identify 3 specific actions which can be taken to apply some of what has been learned in this training series.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

The Potentially Transformative Effect of Measuring the Health of a Community (Research to Reality). Year Developed: 2012. Source: National Cancer Institute, Office of Communications and Education. Presenter(s): Kurt Stange, MD, PhD; Terry Allan, MPH; Paul Jarris, MD, MBA. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online seminar explains how the functional health, and the social, environmental, behavioral and health care determinants of a community can be measured and reported, thus engaging and empowering multiple stakeholders – both individual and groups – to take responsibility for working together to improve health, its determinants and equity. It explores tools and resources, such as the County Health Rankings, to measure the health of a community and ways that have the potential to stimulate multistakeholder engagement, and to serve as a focus for ongoing efforts to improve community health and health equity. Dr. Kurt Stange highlights models of how measuring the health of a community and how this knowledge, generated and followed over time, can empower multi-stakeholder groups to take responsibility for working together to improve health, its determinants, and equity. Terry Allen and Paul Jarris join the seminar to share their experiences in working across sectors to measuring community health at the local and national levels, and will engage participants in sharing their experiences and lessons learned, and thoughts on how other communities can use this approach to improve health and equity.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the opportunities for measuring community health and models to do so at both the local and national level. • Discuss how measuring the health of a community, and the knowledge generated, can help to empower multi-stakeholder groups to work together. • Share their experiences in measuring community health and engaging multi-stakeholders.

Defining the Challenge (WISH Module 2). Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This training presents data that illuminate the relationship and interdependence of mental health, substance abuse, violence, and chronic disease as they affect the long and short term health of women of reproductive age. It is the second training in a six-part series designed for those public health and/or mental health professionals who oversee health programs and services for adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. It is strongly recommended that users complete the modules in the series in sequence. To see a complete listing for the series please go to the Training Series section of this site. The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) was a training grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 2010-13 with a partnership between the NC Institute for Public Health and the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health at the UNC School of Medicine. The project focused on promoting integrative community approaches to optimize mental and physical health among adolescents and women of reproductive age.

Learning Objectives: • Describe epidemiologic data for women of childbearing age related to mental health, substance abuse, violence and injury, and chronic disease. • Discuss the inter-relationship of these issues as they impact women’s health.

Continuing Education: 1.33 Certificate of Attendance

Bringing it All Together: An Integrated Approach (WISH Module 6). Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This is the final training in a six-part series designed for public health and/or mental health professionals who oversee health programs and services for adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. It brings together the content of the earlier modules in the series to show the complete model of the integrated approach with all of its component parts. It also has suggested exercises for learners who would like to think about how some of the concepts learned in the training series might be relevant to their own professional settings. It is strongly recommended that users complete the modules in the series in sequence. To see a complete listing for the series please go to the Training Series section of this site. The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) was a training grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 2010-13 with a partnership between the NC Institute for Public Health and the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health at the UNC School of Medicine. The project focused on promoting integrative community approaches to optimize mental and physical health among adolescents and women of reproductive age.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how various components such as evidence-based practice, a public health approach and partnership come together to form an integrated approach to women’s health issues. • Cite 3 examples of how an integrated approach made an impact in real life situations. • Identify 3 specific actions which can be taken to apply some of what has been learned in this training series.

Life Course Nutrition: Maternal and Child Health Strategies in Public Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Donna B. Johnson, PhD, RD, Elizabeth Adams, PhD, RD, Marion Taylor Baer, PhD, RD, Leslie Cunningham-Sabo, PhD, RD, Dena Herman, PhD, MPH, RD. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 75 minutes.

Annotation: This online module, based on a life course framework, is designed to help public health leaders describe the role of maternal and child nutrition in population health and identify actions they can take to create equitable access to healthy foods and food environments. There are three parts to the module: 1) Why Nutrition Matters, 2) The Life Course Framework, and 3) Applying the Life Course Framework. Each of these parts contains several expansive subtopics, a summary, and a “knowledge check” exercise. An additional, cumulative quiz is provided at the end of the module. A glossary and list of resources is also provided.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the role of maternal and child health (MCH) nutrition in the lifelong health of the population. • Access resources for assessment, assurance, and policy development for MCH nutrition. • Identify ways to integrate MCH nutrition within state and local public health agencies. • Apply the principles of the life course framework for population-based public health actions and initiatives.

Special Instructions: Registration to PH LearnLink is required. Click on the “Trainings” link and then the “Courses” link. Scroll down to “Life Course Nutrition: Maternal and Child Health Strategies in Public Health” and click on the title to begin.

Continuing Education: 1.2 hours

Building Better Child Care Through Health Consultation . Year Developed: n.a.. Source: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 17 minutes.

Annotation: This video introduces the role of the Child Care Health Consultant. With a growing number of children under the age of five enrolled in regular out-of-home child care, it is important that these facilities be equipped to respond appropriately to the health and safety of children. A Child Care Health Consultant is trained to address issues such as playground safety and infectious diseases. The viewer hears the experiences of child care center directors, health consultants, and consultant trainers.

Special Instructions: You can choose to view this video online, or download a copy to your computer, or order a DVD of the video.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.