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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 36 found.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Lessons and Examples for State and Local Advocacy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Sue Lynn Ledford, DrPH, MPA, BSN, RN; Alisahah Cole, MD; Gary Gunderson, DMin, DDiv. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: In turbulent political times, crafting public health messages that resonate across differing political ideologies is more important and challenging than ever. In this webinar, the presenters offer practical examples of how public health issues have been effectively communicated across party lines in the politically divided state of North Carolina through the application of Moral Foundations Theory. Examples include successfully advocating for sterile needle exchange, invoking community loyalty to support healthcare system collaborations using GIS mapping, and developing partnerships with faith communities to promote health. Based on these examples and a wealth of experience, the presenters will provide public health practitioners and advocates with tools, advice and strategies to assist them in looking deeper into distressed communities to understand the community’s values, needs, and complexity, and to focus locally to design solutions alongside diverse coalitions that may include faith networks, law enforcement, healthcare providers, and other (sometimes unexpected) stakeholders.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

The Applicability and Transferability (A&T) Tool. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Donna Ciliska, RN, PhD; Melanie Hood, MsC; Stephanie Bale, MPH; Shannon Dowdall-Smith, RN, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes (42 slides). presentation slides

Annotation: The Applicability and Transferability of Evidence Tool (A&T Tool) is designed to help public health managers and planners to choose appropriate programs for their communities. This tool gives a process and criteria to assess: -Applicability, or the feasibility of providing an intervention in a local setting (i.e. effectiveness, organizational culture and capacity) -Transferability, the likelihood that the intervention developed and delivered in one setting can achieve the same outcomes when applied in a different local setting.

Learning Objectives:

System Change Yin and Yang, How To Promote Quality Improvement and Adaptability While Maintaining Fidelity Across Communities and Partnerships. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Adrienne Gilbert, MPH; Angela Paxton; Mary Jo Paladino, MSA; Nancy Swigonski, MD, MPH. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop highlights both the tension and successes (yin & yang) of: 1) collaborations and partnerships among health care professionals, families of CYSHCN, and community partners, including schools, not‐for‐profits, and insurers; 2) use of measures and data to ensure consistently positive outcomes 3) use of a family‐driven systems change approach rather than a program based approach in North Carolina to address community improvements for families of CYSHCN and 4) allowing flexibility needed for implementation efforts across widely varying communities and health care settings while maintaining fidelity to the program. North Carolina’s Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative and Indiana’s Child Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP IN for Quality) share how they each created positive change in statewide systems that provide services to CYSHCN.

Partnering in the Title V Block Grant Process. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Nora Wells, Lisa Maynes, Pip Marks, Joni Bruce, Diana Autin. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 64 minutes. List of training webinars

Annotation: Title V needs family involvement to strengthen the Block Grant. In this webinar, a panel of family leaders from three states--California, Oklahoma, and Vermont--shared their organizations' involvement in the Block Grant process and detail their paths to partnership with their state Title V, sharing tips and lessons learned along the way for building this important relationship. The list of training webinars provides a link to the slides and 5 handouts for this presentation.

Integration and Coordination in a Changing Public Health World. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Cynthia Morrison; Janna Bardi, MPH; Pama Joyner, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: In 2011 the Washington State Department of Health Office of Healthy Communities integrated MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention funded work. Through a streamlined organizational structure, merging two offices into one, 14 state plans were collapsed into one comprehensive plan. This training reviews key steps in integrating MCH programs and activities with chronic disease prevention programs and activities that resulted in the Washington State Plan for Healthy Communities. The workshop covers lessons learned and results to date.

Engagement of Family Leader Organizations in Non-CSHCN Initiatives. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Malia Corde, Amy Nienhuis, Jane St. John, Susan Bird. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 53 minutes.

Annotation: Family involvement is essential to the successful development and adoption of health-related programs that affect families. Family engagement is now being measured across MCH systems and not just within programs for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Family organizations serving families of CSHCN are already actively engaged in partnerships around how to promote family engagement in health care beyond CSHCN populations. This webinar was a panel presentation of three Family to Family Health Information Centers (F2Fs) and Family Voices State Affiliate Organizations (FV SAOs) highlighting examples and lessons learned from their successful partnerships and collaborations on Non-CSHCN initiatives. Speakers: Malia Corde of New Jersey's Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) will highlight three projects, funded through the NJ Department of Health and NJ Department of Human Services, that focus on improving pregnancy outcomes and the prevention of birth defects and developmental disabilities. Amy Nienhuis of Family Connection in South Carolina will discuss elements of her organization's state contract with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control that reach beyond CSHCN populations. Jane St. John and Susan Bird of Missouri Family to Family will highlight an evolution of partnerships with stakeholders including Missouri's Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems and Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting which have resulted in increased family involvement in several initiatives across the state.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Community Engagement: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Public Health Centers for Excellence. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 7 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides an overview of what community engagement is, the continuum of community involvement, its importance, when to engage a community, methods of engagement, and tools to assist in the process. The presentation is part of a Performance Management in Public Health training series, presented by Washington’s Public Health Centers for Excellence and funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Addressing Preparedness Challenges for Children in Public Health Emergencies. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 62 minutes. YouTube Video

Annotation: This session of CDC Grand Rounds discusses strategies to address the unique vulnerabilities of children in every stage of emergency planning. Presenters highlight the strong progress that has been made in pediatric disaster readiness as well as the collaboration that is still needed between public health professionals and pediatric care providers to improve the outcomes for children during emergencies.

Learning Objectives: • Understand that children have different needs than adults, and require special attention, such as pediatric-focused care during emergencies. • Address the unique needs of children that have not been adequately addressed in the planning process. • Incorporate the needs of children into emergency preparedness planning.

Continuing Education: CME, CE

5-Minute MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Varies.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: 5-Minute MCH is a microlearning program designed to cover each of the 12 MCH Leadership Competencies. The program is structured using an easy-to-follow modular format designed to increase knowledge and skills through 5-minute intensive learning sessions. In module 1 of each competency, participants will learn about a new competency through a 5-minute video podcast. This includes learning what knowledge and skill sets each competency contains and how they are important in the daily work of MCH professionals. In module 2 of each competency, participants will receive 5 highly focused learning opportunities for that competency. Learners may take one or all of the trainings to sharpen knowledge and skills. In module 3 of each competency, participants will receive 5 implementation strategies to put knowledge to practice. Learners may share their experiences implementing the strategies on the 5-Minute Portal. In module 4 of each competency, participants will hear a 5-minute presentation from an expert in the field.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.