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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 23 found.

Health Equity Guide Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Human Impact Partners. Presenter(s): Linda Rae Murray, Rebekah Gowler, Deborah Garneau, Shawna Davie, Matias Valenzuela, Jordan Bingham, Evonda Smith, Sandi Galvez, Rex Archer, Lili Farhang, Andy Wessel, Jeanne Ayers. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: 255 minutes.

Annotation: This 4-part webinar series brings together national experts and local health departments to discuss their work to advance health equity. Each webinar focuses on a set of strategic practices that health departments can take to pursue a wall-to-wall transformation of how they work internally, with communities, and alongside other government agencies.

Equity, Health Transformation, and Early Childhood Systems Building. Year Developed: 2020. Source: InCK Marks. Presenter(s): Charles Bruner, Kay Johnson, Maxine Hayes, Fan Tait, Wendy Ellis. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar learn about: • The Framework for Child Health Transformation • The Equity Imperative in Health and Early Childhood • Child Health Care and Early Childhood Systems Building

Operationalizing Family and Youth Leadership in Systems of Care (SOCs). Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Johanna Bergen and Millie Sweeny. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 84 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focus on how to operationalize family and youth leadership in all phases of SOC development and expansion. Presenters will share a framework with specific questions and strategies that can be used to guide the implementation of family- and youth-driven approaches. This webinar is part of the SOC Expansion Leadership Learning Community. Additional resources are listed on the youtube page.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the requirements and value of of youth and family engagement and leadership of systems of care (SOCs). • Understand roles for youth and families at all levels. • Learn about partnering with youth- and family-run organizations. • Learn about the use of guiding questions as a framework for assessing and implementing youth and family engagement and leadership. • Engage in question and answer discussion.

Direct Connect: Conducting Youth Focus Groups. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Brittany Horton; Kemarion Thacher. Type: Webinar. Level: n.a.. Length: 73 minutes.

Annotation: Direct Connect: Led by Youth M.O.V.E. National, this LC is a virtual forum for youth and young adults to develop professional skill sets via virtual training opportunities, connect as a community to share and gather new resources, and unite with other youth advocates and professional peers from across the country.March's Direct Connect will cover the components of a youth focus group, its purpose and an overview on how to successfully conduct them. Focus groups are used to gather information before, during or after youth programming and activities. The information gathered can help with assessing the needs of the youth, collecting general information, developing programs, activities and ideas, and evaluating outcomes. This webinar will also cover a variety of focus group designs, methods, and formats as well as share a variety of interactive activities that can be used during focus groups to help youth feel comfortable while also gathering important information. yyy

The Applicability and Transferability (A&T) Tool. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Donna Ciliska, RN, PhD; Melanie Hood, MsC; Stephanie Bale, MPH; Shannon Dowdall-Smith, RN, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes (42 slides). presentation slides

Annotation: The Applicability and Transferability of Evidence Tool (A&T Tool) is designed to help public health managers and planners to choose appropriate programs for their communities. This tool gives a process and criteria to assess: -Applicability, or the feasibility of providing an intervention in a local setting (i.e. effectiveness, organizational culture and capacity) -Transferability, the likelihood that the intervention developed and delivered in one setting can achieve the same outcomes when applied in a different local setting.

Learning Objectives:

System Change Yin and Yang, How To Promote Quality Improvement and Adaptability While Maintaining Fidelity Across Communities and Partnerships. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Adrienne Gilbert, MPH; Angela Paxton; Mary Jo Paladino, MSA; Nancy Swigonski, MD, MPH. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop highlights both the tension and successes (yin & yang) of: 1) collaborations and partnerships among health care professionals, families of CYSHCN, and community partners, including schools, not‐for‐profits, and insurers; 2) use of measures and data to ensure consistently positive outcomes 3) use of a family‐driven systems change approach rather than a program based approach in North Carolina to address community improvements for families of CYSHCN and 4) allowing flexibility needed for implementation efforts across widely varying communities and health care settings while maintaining fidelity to the program. North Carolina’s Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative and Indiana’s Child Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP IN for Quality) share how they each created positive change in statewide systems that provide services to CYSHCN.

Partnering in the Title V Block Grant Process. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Nora Wells, Lisa Maynes, Pip Marks, Joni Bruce, Diana Autin. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 64 minutes. List of training webinars

Annotation: Title V needs family involvement to strengthen the Block Grant. In this webinar, a panel of family leaders from three states--California, Oklahoma, and Vermont--shared their organizations' involvement in the Block Grant process and detail their paths to partnership with their state Title V, sharing tips and lessons learned along the way for building this important relationship. The list of training webinars provides a link to the slides and 5 handouts for this presentation.

Integration and Coordination in a Changing Public Health World. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Cynthia Morrison; Janna Bardi, MPH; Pama Joyner, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: In 2011 the Washington State Department of Health Office of Healthy Communities integrated MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention funded work. Through a streamlined organizational structure, merging two offices into one, 14 state plans were collapsed into one comprehensive plan. This training reviews key steps in integrating MCH programs and activities with chronic disease prevention programs and activities that resulted in the Washington State Plan for Healthy Communities. The workshop covers lessons learned and results to date.

Engagement of Family Leader Organizations in Non-CSHCN Initiatives. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Malia Corde, Amy Nienhuis, Jane St. John, Susan Bird. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 53 minutes.

Annotation: Family involvement is essential to the successful development and adoption of health-related programs that affect families. Family engagement is now being measured across MCH systems and not just within programs for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Family organizations serving families of CSHCN are already actively engaged in partnerships around how to promote family engagement in health care beyond CSHCN populations. This webinar was a panel presentation of three Family to Family Health Information Centers (F2Fs) and Family Voices State Affiliate Organizations (FV SAOs) highlighting examples and lessons learned from their successful partnerships and collaborations on Non-CSHCN initiatives. Speakers: Malia Corde of New Jersey's Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) will highlight three projects, funded through the NJ Department of Health and NJ Department of Human Services, that focus on improving pregnancy outcomes and the prevention of birth defects and developmental disabilities. Amy Nienhuis of Family Connection in South Carolina will discuss elements of her organization's state contract with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control that reach beyond CSHCN populations. Jane St. John and Susan Bird of Missouri Family to Family will highlight an evolution of partnerships with stakeholders including Missouri's Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems and Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting which have resulted in increased family involvement in several initiatives across the state.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.