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Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Health Equity Guide Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Human Impact Partners. Presenter(s): Linda Rae Murray, Rebekah Gowler, Deborah Garneau, Shawna Davie, Matias Valenzuela, Jordan Bingham, Evonda Smith, Sandi Galvez, Rex Archer, Lili Farhang, Andy Wessel, Jeanne Ayers. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: 255 minutes.

Annotation: This 4-part webinar series brings together national experts and local health departments to discuss their work to advance health equity. Each webinar focuses on a set of strategic practices that health departments can take to pursue a wall-to-wall transformation of how they work internally, with communities, and alongside other government agencies.

MCH Needs Assessment Toolkit. Year Developed: 2019. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center, AMCHP, and the MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training toolkit focuses on learning opportunities and practical tools for use by the Title V workforce in understanding and implementing needs assessment, including community partnerships, data, program monitoring and evaluation, policy analysis, and principles of public health. It was developed by a collaboration of the National MCH Workforce Development Center, AMCHP, and the MCH Navigator.

Innovations in Patient Engagement to Improve Patient Safety in Primary Care. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Clinical Directors Network. Presenter(s): Kelly M. Smith, PhD; Kelley M. Baker, MA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This series of webinars includes the following: Be Prepared to Be Engaged (June 6, 2018) Create a Safe Medicine List Together (June 21, 2018) Teach-Back (August 1, 2018) Warm Handoff Plus (August 9, 2018)0

Learning Objectives: • Review the key threats to patient safety in primary care settings and interventions to engage patients and families to improve safety. • Describe the role and value of each innovation in improving patient safety. • Identify strategies for implementing each innovation in primary care settings.

Special Instructions: Must enter email address to view webinar.

Implementation Brief: Family-Professional Partnerships. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced. Podcast

Annotation: This training brief provides specific learning opportunities and resources for use by the Title V workforce that focus on how to implement and execute skills associated with family-professional partnerships.

Direct Connect Learning Community - Working with LGBTQI2S Youth. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Peter Gamache, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Led by Youth M.O.V.E. National, this LC is a virtual forum for youth and young adults to develop professional skill sets via virtual training opportunities, connect as a community to share and gather new resources, and unite with other youth advocates and professional peers from across the country. October's Direct Connect offering is presented by Peter Gamache, Ph.D. and covers the topic of working with youth and young adults in the LGBTQI2S community.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss demographic trends and the visibility of LGBTQI2-S youth and young adults. •Describe gaps in service systems that contribute to LGBTQI2-S youth and young adult disparities. •Describe strategies for addressing LGBTQI2-S youth and young adult disparities.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

Using Geographic Information Science to Advance Heath Equity and Environmental Justice. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Andrew Maroko, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Environmental factors have an important impact on the health of communities. Public health professionals may use geographic information sciences (GIS) to assess the health of communities by analyzing exposure, or being subjected to negative factors such as pollution, as well as accessibility, or the ability to access positive factors such as green space and healthy food. In this webinar, Dr. Andrew Maroko discusses the process of geovisualization, hypothesis generation, data exploration, and communication and knowledge transfer in conducting environmental justice research. Dr. Maroko also describes various methods and technologies used to estimate exposure and accessibility, and provides examples of GIS in environmental justice/health equity projects in New York City and Glasgow, Scotland.

Learning Objectives: • To describe how geographic information science can be used to advance health equity and environmental justice. • To describe the environmental factors that lead to health disparities. • To list examples of how geographic information science has been used in health equity research.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Continuing Education: CHES, CPHCE

Title V Transformation Tools. Year Developed: 2017. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grants to States Program has established 15 National Performance Measures (NPMs) for the 2015-2017 grant cycle. In order to effectively address the NPMs, MCH professionals need to think about not only the evidence and strategies to make change, but also the capacity of the workforce to carry out these activities. Six skill sets have been identified by the National MCH Workforce Development Center to support overall implementation of the Title V NPMs: (1) advancing equity; (2) analytical and assessment skills; (3) building and sustaining partnerships; (4) financial and management skills; (5) implementation; and (6) leadership and systems thinking skills. The MCH Navigator in collaboration with the Center has developed this crosswalk to guide MCH professionals to online learning opportunities and implementation resources to support these skill sets.

Learning Objectives: Review of each NPM across the six skills sets: •Well-Woman Visit (NPM 1) •Low-Risk Cesarean Deliveries (NPM 2) •Perinatal Regionalization (NPM 3) •Breastfeeding (NPM 4) •Safe Sleep (NPM 5) • Developmental Screening (NPM 6) •Child Safety/Injury (NPM 7) •Physical Activity (NPM 8) •Bullying (NPM 9) •Adolescent Wll-Visit (NPM 10) •Medical Home (NPM 11) •Transition (NPM 12) •Oral Health (NPM 13) •Smoking (NPM 14) •Adequate Insurance Coverage (NPM 15)

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.