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Displaying records 1 through 8 of 8 found.

Ensuring Equity in COVID-19 Decision Making: Equity Lens Tool for Health Departments. Year Developed: 2021. Source: Human Impact Partners and Big Cities Health Coalition. Presenter(s): Lili Farhang, Heather Jue Northover, and Gretchen Musicant. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Recording of January 11, 2021 webinar where Human Impact Partners and Big Cities Health Coalition discuss their tool to support health departments in addressing equity in COVID-19 response. Featuring Lili Farhang, Co-Director, Human Impact Partners, Heather Jue Northover, Director, Center for Health Equity, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and Gretchen Musicant, Commissioner, City of Minneapolis Health Department.

Learning Objectives: • Reenergize the practice of applying an equity lens in COVID-19 decision making. • Assess how decisions will be experienced by specific communities and ensure these decisions work for the people most impacted. • Learn an approach for engaging with and remaining accountable to communities historically disenfranchised from decision making.

Strategies for Promoting Health Equity in Your State. Year Developed: 2019. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Web Trainig Self Study. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: A commonly asked question across states is “What strategic steps can we take to advance health equity at our health department?” In response to this need in the field the MCH Navigator in collaboration with the National MCH Workforce Development Center created this learning opportunity to assist MCH professionals in answering that question. Originally a full presentation focused on health equity conducted by the National MCH Workforce Development Center, we have separated it into multiple sections for easier access and the ability for learners to quickly locate specific sections of interest. This resource is formatted to include the following sections: an introduction, 10 individual strategies to achieve health equity, a presentation by Nevillene White of the New York State Department of Health which provides success stories applying health equity strategies in the field, and a short wrap up with additional resources provided. yyy

Getting Our House in Order: Addressing Internal Racial Equity. Year Developed: 2019. Source: CityMatch. Presenter(s): Jessica Ehule; Ann Novias; Janet Jones;. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 91 minutes.

Annotation: The desire to achieve equity drives the reason why many of us work in the field of maternal and child health. Racial inequities are evident in health outcomes across the board. In addressing these disparities, organizations often neglect to assess how they may be contributing to the racial inequities we work so hard to eliminate. We are working within a system founded on principles to advance specific groups of people, while leaving others behind. This foundation has led to biases being present in our policies, procedures, and day-to-day interactions. The webinar features CityMatCH members Janet Jones of the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District, Ana Novais of the Rhode Island Department of Health, and Jessica Ehule, CityMatCH staff member. Join CityMatCH’s Equity Action group and CityLeaders Cohort 12 as we discuss the strategies used by these agencies to actualize racial equity with discussion about how leaders can be impactful in this work.

Implementation Brief: Cultural Competency. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced. Podcast

Annotation: This training brief provides specific learning opportunities and resources for use by the Title V workforce that focus on how to implement and execute skills associated with cultural competency.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

CLC Peer Learning Exchange: Implementing the CLAS Standards- Culturally and Linguistically Competent Leadership Development. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Linda Callejas & Selena Webster-Bass. Type: Webinar. Level: n.a.. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on providing participants with practical strategies for implementing Standards Nos. 2 and 4 of the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate in Health and Health Care (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2013). The standards are: 2) Advance and sustain organizational governance and leadership that promotes CLAS and health equity through policy, practices and allocated resources. 4) Educate and train governance, leadership and workforce in culturally and linguistically appropriate policies and practices on an ongoing basis.

Influencing Change in Public and Organizational Policy in Support of Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This "Web-based Learning and Reflection" forum is designed to share examples from organizations that have recognized their own limitations in promoting cultural diversity and advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence within human services, or those within the systems in which they are involved, related to the lack of cultural diversity and marginal attention that is given to fostering cultural and linguistic competence.

Learning Objectives: • Define a model of cultural competence including the role of policy in its implementation. • Define linguistic competence (Goode & Jones framework). • Cite legal mandates and requirements (policy directives) for language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. • Describe three approaches to influence change in organizational and public policy that promote cultural diversity and advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about such change.

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.