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Displaying records 1 through 9 of 9 found.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Exploring Implicit Bias in Interprofessional Education and Practice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Presenter(s): Dr. Margaret Stuber, Dr. Janice Sabin. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Series landing page

Annotation: Implicit or unconscious assumptions and biases challenge collaborative work within interprofessional teams and affect health equity for the population. Although pattern recognition is used by all health care professionals in their work, the results of assumptions made on the basis of past experience can be a hazard to client’s health. Women can be undertreated for heart disease, wealthy people may not be tested for HIV, or people of certain cultures may be undertreated for pain. Similarly, assumptions about people in specific professional fields may shape the way we interact, limiting the efficacy of our teams. This webinar addressed the definition and science of implicit or unconscious bias, as well as its role in contributing to social determinants of health. It used case examples to illustrate how unconscious bias affects clinical care, and discussed the research in this field. It presented ways to mitigate the effects of unconscious bias in health care, including diverse input in clinical decision-making and team care. It discussed how these ideas and objectives can be incorporated effectively into interprofessional education.

Learning Objectives: • Review the science of implicit social cognition and define implicit associations. • Describe situations in which unconscious bias may affect clinical care. • Identify strategies to minimize the influence of unconscious bias on interactions with patients and other healthcare professionals.

Special Instructions: All individuals will be required to set up a learner profile through a guest account to register for AIHC educational activities. More information about this one-time process and how to register for AIHC webinars can be found at https://aihc-us.org/AIHCregistration.

Engaging and Partnering with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Wendy Jones, Barbara Hueler. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Establishing and sustaining broad-based community partnerships in support of the full inclusion of and equity for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) present myriad benefits while simultaneously presenting unique challenges. Many organizations and programs within the I/DD network continue to struggle with engaging communities in a culturally and linguistically competent manner. This forum explores the experiences of organizations in Arizona, California, and Maryland in their successful initiatives to engage African American, Chinese, and Latino/Hispanic communities in support of people with intellectual and development disabilities across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives: • Examine the conceptual frameworks, values, and practices of cultural and linguistic competence within the context of community engagement. • Describe approaches and strategies to engage diverse communities to plan, implement, and evaluate services and supports for individuals who experience developmental and other disabilities and their families. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about organizational and system change.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Diversity and Succession Planning. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Sue Plaster, MEd. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This workshop is designed to prepare participants as leaders in their respective public health organizations to both prepare for and take part in structured leadership presentations and conversations about their succession plans. The format of the training and exercises show the participants how to integrate workforce and leadership diversity into each step of their activities. The workshop components include an overview of succession planning with mini-exercises to try out the concepts, explanation of a seven-step succession and diversity presentation method, a review of how staff development activities tie to succession planning work, introduction of templates for succession planning, and a deep dive into the methods for integrating diversity and cultural competence work into succession analysis.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the purpose, terminology and basic methods of succession planning. • Understand methods, approaches and templates for a succession planning and talent review process that integrates diversity into the conversation. • Learn practices that improve diversity sourcing, recruitment and retention. • Discuss how to best integrate workforce diversity status and health equity assessment into succession planning work. • Understand the benefits of linking planning and diversity and have concrete ideas how to do so for their respective organizations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.4 CEU/CE

Transformational Leadership: Women Lead the Way. Year Developed: 2012. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Linda Tarr-Whelan. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 42 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar describes the importance of women in leadership roles and as change agents, why it matters for women to be 30% of the leadership, how other countries are ahead of the United States, what women can to to transform leadership, and how women can prepare themselves to be leaders.

Considering Cultural Competence in the Context of Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Center for Puerto Rican Studies-Centro. Presenter(s): Diana Romero PhD, MA; Elena Hoeppner, MPH; Andrea Skowronek, RD, MPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces a module/educational program in cultural competency specifically for public health professionals. Examples of disparities in health outcomes is addressed as well as tools to become culturally competent public health providers.

Strengthening Your MCH Workforce through Cultural Competency (Capacity Building Webinar #4). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Darcel Scharff, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 83 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter discusses strategies to engage and celebrate the communities that local public health professionals serve. Specific examples focus on the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency • Describe the role of cultural competency in workforce development for local public health professionals. • List barriers to becoming culturally competent. • Explain ways in which local public health professionals can become culturally competent. • Identify 1-2 examples of how to apply cultural competence to a workforce development opportunity for a home visitation program.

Continuing Education:

Culture and Health Literacy: Case Studies in Culture and Health Literacy. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Three local efforts to address the health literacy gap in Minnesota are discussed. These include: the ECHO Project (Emergency Preparedness with Cultural Communities), PhotoVoice, and the Urban Health Agenda Community Advisory Committee (UHACAC). These projects represent cutting-edge work related to health literacy targeting cultural groups.

Learning Objectives: • Identify innovative strategies that can improve health literacy among cultural groups. • Discuss successes and challenges in designing and implementing strategies to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • Describe what other communities are doing to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • List what steps can be taken to stimulate further discussion on this topic.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.