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Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

The Occupational (Im)Possibilities in a Segregated Neighborhood: A Matter of Justice in LCHD. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Jyothi Gupta, PhD, ORT/L, FAOTA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the sixth in the LCRN’s series on Occupational Therapy and MCH: An Emerging Partnership to Improve Early Family Experiences and Life Course Health Development – features Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA. Dr. Gupta is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and Professor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at St. Catherine University. Her research interests are identifying contextual barriers to full participation of marginalized groups and identifying strategies to maximize participation. This webinar focuses on her experience in applying the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model to one of her community partner sites in rural Mississippi.

Learning Objectives: • Explore the conceptual synergy of life course health development (LCHD) model and the occupational perspective of health and well-being. • Describe the conceptual alignment of the occupational perspective to health development. • Discuss the occupational lives of children living in a racially segregated rural community and potential negative impact on health and well-being.

Race and Ethnicity Matter: Understanding Childhood Obesity through the Lens of Health Equity and Justice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Leadership for Healthy Communities. Presenter(s): Maya Rockeymoore, PhD, Shavon Arline-Bradley, MPH; Kathy Ko Chin, MS; Steven Lopez, MPP/MPH; Olivia Roanhorse, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: This webinar looks at how inequities in social, economic, and environmental justice impact health and the policy and systems changes that are needed to ensure all kids are able to live long, healthy lives. Despite signs that the national childhood obesity rate may be leveling off, many of our most vulnerable youth including African-American, Latino, American Indian, Asian & Pacific Islander American, rural, and low-income children and teens remain disproportionally impacted by the epidemic. These health disparities show that where we live matters and that too many families still lack access to affordable, nutritious foods and safe opportunities to be active.

Special Instructions: Use #healthequity to take part in the conversation on social media.

Understanding Immigration and Refugee Trauma: What Do We Know and How Do We Intervene? (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Carolyn Garcia, PhD; Amirthini Keefe; Andrea Northwood, PhD, LP. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This training describes how child and adolescent professionals address health and education inequities and health disparities in ways that promote mental health, personal safety, and educational success for immigrant children and youth. Presenters discussed traumatic stresses associated with immigration and different approaches and interventions, such as a photo-voice project with Hispanic youth to promote mental health. The training consists of a video (165 minutes), presentation notes, and other materials. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by homelessness by restoring and promoting emotional and psychological safety and promoting healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Identify a framework for understanding the complex context in which families immigrate to Minnesota; to the U.S. • Describe how experiences and resources differ between immigrants living in urban versus rural communities. • Identify reasons that immigrant youth and families experience educational and health inequities and disparities.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Diversity and Succession Planning. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Sue Plaster, MEd. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This workshop is designed to prepare participants as leaders in their respective public health organizations to both prepare for and take part in structured leadership presentations and conversations about their succession plans. The format of the training and exercises show the participants how to integrate workforce and leadership diversity into each step of their activities. The workshop components include an overview of succession planning with mini-exercises to try out the concepts, explanation of a seven-step succession and diversity presentation method, a review of how staff development activities tie to succession planning work, introduction of templates for succession planning, and a deep dive into the methods for integrating diversity and cultural competence work into succession analysis.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the purpose, terminology and basic methods of succession planning. • Understand methods, approaches and templates for a succession planning and talent review process that integrates diversity into the conversation. • Learn practices that improve diversity sourcing, recruitment and retention. • Discuss how to best integrate workforce diversity status and health equity assessment into succession planning work. • Understand the benefits of linking planning and diversity and have concrete ideas how to do so for their respective organizations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.4 CEU/CE

Historical Trauma and Generational Trauma: Significance and Response (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2012. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Atum Azzahir; BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, PhD; Jessica Gourneau; Melissa Walls, PhD . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This training discusses the historical and generational trauma from the perspective of American Indians and African Americans and builds on Dr. Karina Walter’s presentation (see Historical Trauma, Microaggressions, and Identity: A Framework for Culturally-Based Practice). A panel of community and university professionals discuss cultural ways of knowing, how healing and wellness take place within families and communities, and where the science of historical and intergenerational trauma currently exists. The training consists of a video (74 minutes) and presentation notes by each author. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by historical and generational trauma to restore and promote cultural identity and promote healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Understand approaches to historical and generational trauma from community, science, and historical perspectives. • Define a theory of “sickness” and the impact of loss of culture and community on individual health and healing. • Identify the impact of historical and intergenerational trauma on communities, families, and individuals. • Incorporate cultural ways of knowing and healing for individuals, families, and communities.

Strengthening Your MCH Workforce through Cultural Competency (Capacity Building Webinar #4). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Darcel Scharff, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 83 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter discusses strategies to engage and celebrate the communities that local public health professionals serve. Specific examples focus on the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency • Describe the role of cultural competency in workforce development for local public health professionals. • List barriers to becoming culturally competent. • Explain ways in which local public health professionals can become culturally competent. • Identify 1-2 examples of how to apply cultural competence to a workforce development opportunity for a home visitation program.

Continuing Education:

Cultural Competence and Global Leadership. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): David Steffen, PhD, Virginia Suarez, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Direct link

Annotation: The topic of global leadership and cultural competence becomes more important as work increasingly becomes global. This 60-minute slide presentation discusses the definition, key concepts and continuum of cultural competence, as well as the rationale for it and research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. Dr. Steffen discusses the difference between cultural competency and diversity, defining the “four layers” of diversity. Demographic trends within the U.S. and their significance are briefly touched on, as well as recent critical findings on health disparities. Leadership across cultures, Hofstede’s benchmark research, which identified five major dimensions on which cultures differ (Individualism vs Collectivism, Masculinity vs Femininity, Uncertainty Avoidance, Longterm Orientation, and Power Distance), is discussed in detail. Research findings from the GLOBE study are reviewed, in the context of global leadership attributes. The session addresses communication styles from different cultures as well as intercultural conflict styles and strategies to effectively resolve conflict.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency and global leadership. • Understand research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. • Describe several intercultural conflict styles and strategies.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Cultural Competence and Global Leadership” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.”

Culture and Health Literacy: Case Studies in Culture and Health Literacy. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Three local efforts to address the health literacy gap in Minnesota are discussed. These include: the ECHO Project (Emergency Preparedness with Cultural Communities), PhotoVoice, and the Urban Health Agenda Community Advisory Committee (UHACAC). These projects represent cutting-edge work related to health literacy targeting cultural groups.

Learning Objectives: • Identify innovative strategies that can improve health literacy among cultural groups. • Discuss successes and challenges in designing and implementing strategies to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • Describe what other communities are doing to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • List what steps can be taken to stimulate further discussion on this topic.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.