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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 17 found.

Building Health Equity in Systems of Care by Engaging Diverse Families and Youth in Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Ways. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Linda Callejas, Catalina Booth, Rocio A. Tucen, Taylor Blanco, Daniella Dominguez, and Myriam Monsalve Serna. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on practical strategies for engaging diverse families and youth in culturally and linguistically appropriate ways. Topics covered include opening doors through language assistance, outreach and relationship building, establishing trust and creating a welcoming environment that attracts culturally diverse people, and more. This webinar is part of the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Learning Community. Additional resources are listed on the youtube page.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Collaborating Across Cultures. Year Developed: 2017. Source: ASA Community of Applied Statisticians. Presenter(s): Charisse Kosova, M.Ad.Ed.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 62 minutes.

Annotation: Collaborating across cultures can add an interesting global perspective to the work we do, but intercultural communication also comes with unique challenges. This session explored some of the research-based dimensions of culture that lead to differences in work style preferences and communication styles across cultures. By analyzing mini case studies in which culture interfered with collaboration, this session also offered simple tips and recommended adaptations that can lead to more rewarding and productive collaboration across cultures. A video and presentation slides are available.

Influencing Change in Public and Organizational Policy in Support of Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This "Web-based Learning and Reflection" forum is designed to share examples from organizations that have recognized their own limitations in promoting cultural diversity and advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence within human services, or those within the systems in which they are involved, related to the lack of cultural diversity and marginal attention that is given to fostering cultural and linguistic competence.

Learning Objectives: • Define a model of cultural competence including the role of policy in its implementation. • Define linguistic competence (Goode & Jones framework). • Cite legal mandates and requirements (policy directives) for language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. • Describe three approaches to influence change in organizational and public policy that promote cultural diversity and advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about such change.

Engaging and Partnering with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Wendy Jones, Barbara Hueler. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Establishing and sustaining broad-based community partnerships in support of the full inclusion of and equity for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) present myriad benefits while simultaneously presenting unique challenges. Many organizations and programs within the I/DD network continue to struggle with engaging communities in a culturally and linguistically competent manner. This forum explores the experiences of organizations in Arizona, California, and Maryland in their successful initiatives to engage African American, Chinese, and Latino/Hispanic communities in support of people with intellectual and development disabilities across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives: • Examine the conceptual frameworks, values, and practices of cultural and linguistic competence within the context of community engagement. • Describe approaches and strategies to engage diverse communities to plan, implement, and evaluate services and supports for individuals who experience developmental and other disabilities and their families. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about organizational and system change.

Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions for New Populations and Settings. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rachel C. Shelton, ScD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. TRAIN.org link

Annotation: Dissemination and implementation sciences are defined as the systematic study of how a specific set of activities and designated strategies are used to successfully adopt and integrate an evidence-based public health intervention (EBI) within specific settings, and are comprised of four steps: 1) exploration, 2) adoption/preparation, 3) implementation, and 4) sustainment. The overall goal is to reduce the gap between science and practice/policy. Implementation research speaks more to processes and factors associated with successful integration of EBIs within a particular setting, while dissemination research focuses on the processes and factors that lead to widespread adoption and use of EBIs. EBIs are shaped by research evidence, resources, population, and context, and are popularly used due to their demonstrated effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and fast process. In order to successfully select an EBI, interventionists must Identify community needs, assess organizational capacity, and search program registries to select a program. When preparing for implementation, and EBI can either be adopted as is or adapted to fit the local conditions. Adaptation is an important part of the process in order to enhance engagement, reach the audience, address disparities, increase fit and relevance, and reinforce the message. Adaptations can be either surface or deep structure, and the use of either or both should be a conscious, well thought out decision. Surface adaptations use visual and auditory cues for culturally appropriate messages, while deep structure adaptations involves cultural sensitivity and comprehensive understanding of ethnic group’s core cultural values, norms, and stressors (economic, social, environmental) affecting health behaviors. Models for guiding adaptation include Card, ADAPT-ITT, and MAP.

Continuing Education: 1 CHES; 1 CPHCE

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

Understanding Immigration and Refugee Trauma: What Do We Know and How Do We Intervene? (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Carolyn Garcia, PhD; Amirthini Keefe; Andrea Northwood, PhD, LP. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This training describes how child and adolescent professionals address health and education inequities and health disparities in ways that promote mental health, personal safety, and educational success for immigrant children and youth. Presenters discussed traumatic stresses associated with immigration and different approaches and interventions, such as a photo-voice project with Hispanic youth to promote mental health. The training consists of a video (165 minutes), presentation notes, and other materials. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by homelessness by restoring and promoting emotional and psychological safety and promoting healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Identify a framework for understanding the complex context in which families immigrate to Minnesota; to the U.S. • Describe how experiences and resources differ between immigrants living in urban versus rural communities. • Identify reasons that immigrant youth and families experience educational and health inequities and disparities.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Considering Cultural Competence in the Context of Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Center for Puerto Rican Studies-Centro. Presenter(s): Diana Romero PhD, MA; Elena Hoeppner, MPH; Andrea Skowronek, RD, MPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces a module/educational program in cultural competency specifically for public health professionals. Examples of disparities in health outcomes is addressed as well as tools to become culturally competent public health providers.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.