Access trainings by the type of learning that matches your need:

Self Directed: Know what you want to learn?

Looking for some assistance to help you find what you're looking for?
MCHfast Guided Search

Still looking or need assistance? You can always ask for Help.

Semi-Structured: Looking for trainings grouped according to your need?

Self-Reflective. Not sure of your learning needs? Take the online Self-Assessment.

Fast & Focused. Want to learn on the go? Sign up for one of our Micro-learning programs.

Intense & Immersive. Looking for a comprehensive course that covers everything? Access the MCHsmart curriculum - Coming Soon.

Focus Areas. Need specialized resources?

Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 9 of 9 found.

Strategies for Successful Public Health Messaging. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Tim Church; James Apa. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar delves into ideas of effective communication, credibility, and the use of social media in creating effective public health campaigns. It explores how audiences receive messages and are motivated for action. Tim Church and James Apa each speak about the high-tech and low-tech strategies that public health organizations should use in sharing public messages to the public across the different phases of a public health event. They also speak about the importance of social media, websites, and partnerships (local, community, medical, media) to target and disseminate public health messages.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize what determines credibility in high and low concern settings. • Identify effective ways to inform the public about developing public health issues. • Describe the importance of working with other partners in disseminating public health information and messages. • Identify how public health messaging needs to change during different phases of a public health event.

Special Instructions: Need to register/log in to access.

Communicating Science: Translating Research for Policy and Practice. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 19 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the rationales for and barriers to taking action to ensure that public health science is communicated beyond academic journals and applied to efforts to improve health for individuals and populations. Cameo video commentary from public information staff of the Institute of Medicine is used to share strategies for being competitive in the marketplace of ideas that interventions and policies are derived from. Downloadable slides and a transcript of the presentation are provided at <http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/writing-skills/Transcript-Translational-Writing.pdf>.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the importance of translating research. • Understand the characteristics of both academic researchers and policymakers. • Learn best practices for health professionals to communicate science for use in policy and practice.

Storytelling as Best Practice. Year Developed: 2012. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Andy Goodman. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Andy Goodman addresses why storytelling is important for public health practice and how to utilize it within the field. He begins by describing why narrative is a powerful persuader and what kinds of stories help make a point. Using organizational identity, Mr. Goodman describes how to build a culture around storytelling. The presentation also highlights MCH organizations that effectively incorporate storytelling into their mission as well as on their website. A question and answer session, slides, and transcripts are available.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why storytelling is the single most powerful communication tool ever created. • Learn specific ways to use stories to advance an organization's mission.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation slides and audio, click on “Presentation Slides” and “Listen to the Recording” under “Materials.” [Note: Need Windows Media Player for audio].

Guidelines for Effective Presentations. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Presenter(s): Heidi Hisey. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: In this webinar, the presenter provides an overview on how to create a clear and effective presentation. She discusses how to use animation, best practices when presenting data and provides options for presenting a variety of information.

Learning Objectives: •Provide tips to make a clear and organized presentation. •Describe options for presenting a variety of information. •Learn guidelines for presenting data. •Learn how to effectively use animation.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Preparing a Successful Manuscript. Year Developed: 2011. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): James Perrin, MD; Donna Petersen, ScD, MHS. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 55 minutes.

Annotation: The webinar is presented by two leading editors in the MCH field about how to prepare a successful manuscript for publication. This session describes the organization and key elements of a research paper. It considers both quantitative and qualitative presentations and makes suggestions regarding making a paper ready for submission. Presenters include (1) Dr. James Perrin,Professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and director of the Division of General Pediatrics and the MGH Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy and founding editor of Academic Pediatrics (formally known as Ambulatory Pediatrics); (2) Dr. Donna Petersen, Dean of USF’s College of Public Health and the Editor-in Chief of the Maternal and Child Health Journal.

Learning Objectives: • Learn how to prepare a successful manuscript for publication. • Describe the organization and key elements of a research paper.

Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press. Year Developed: 2010. Source: National Cancer Institute. Presenter(s): David Nilson, MD, MPH; Brad Hesse, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This seminar gives an overview of the fundamentals of communication in relation to presenting data, including how to select statistics, facts and figures to include. The presenters also show how visual aids can be used effectively, and discuss issues to consider when presenting sensitive data.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the fundamentals of communication in relations to presenting data. • List general considerations when selecting and presenting data. • Describe visual and other modes for presenting data in engaging and effective ways. • Discuss a practical framework on how to present data to lay audiences.

Special Instructions: Registration to TRAIN is required. To access the course, click on the “Registration” tab and then click on “Launch.”

Health Policy Communications. Year Developed: 2007. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Jackie Judd. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation is an overview of the media and how to present information to policy-makers and journalists. Ms. Judd describes the importance of tailoring messages to different audiences and interviewers, as well as establishing rules with a reporter. The presentation also covers the basics of messaging and how to navigate different types of interviews (i.e. print/online, television, and/or radio). The components necessary for briefing decision-makers is also included.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

ARCHIVE / NO LONGER Available: Communications Messaging: How & Why. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Adam Shapiro. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation reviews the value of messaging and the message box process. Mr. Shapiro begins by describing messaging tools (versus facts) and how they can be utilized to influence audiences and their behavior. He provides examples of Maternal and Child Health in the news, gives guidelines for interviewing with reporters, and explains public employee lobbying restrictions. The seminar concludes by describing the message box tool and includes exercises to help the learner create his or her own message box.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the value of messaging. • Understand the message box process. • Be able to create and utilize messages for your own programs and outreach initiatives.

Advanced Program Evaluation. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: New York City, Long Island, Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This online course allows learners to take on the role of a staff member at the Middleton County Health Department tasked with helping to develop an evaluation plan for an obesity-prevention program recently launched in Middleton County. Using the CDC Program Evaluation Framework, learners will connect each step of the framework with a section of the evaluation plan, going into detailed discussion about: incorporating stakeholders, logic models and evaluation questions in the process; characteristics of different research designs for evaluation and considerations for choosing an appropriate design; options for data collection methods and sampling; and thinking through threats to validity. Additionally, the learner will review strategies for conducting rigorous evaluations within constraints of budget, time, and resources.

Learning Objectives: • Appreciate that a comprehensive evaluation plan addresses a program logic, stakeholders, evaluation questions and evaluation design. • Assess advantages and limitations of evaluation designs, including randomized, quasi-experimental and pre-post designs. • Appraise and compare options for data collection methods, measures and sampling strategies. • Identify and address associated threats to validity. • Identify strategies for addressing budget, time, data and political constraints in evaluation practice.

Special Instructions: Prerequisites Through prior training or experience, trainees are expected to have some background knowledge of the following topics: Social science research methods Logic models Stakeholders Process and outcome evaluation Evaluation questions CDC Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.