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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 15 found.

Increasing Impact by Engaging Your Audience: A Guide to Social Marketing for Systems of Care. Year Developed: 2020. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Matthew D. Clay, MS; Michelle Boardman; Anita Bryant. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This session of the System of Care (SOC) Leadership Learning Community will focus on how to increase the impact of social marketing in SOCs. Join this multimedia, interactive discussion of social marketing as a valuable tool for advancing SOC goals. The webinar will include a comprehensive definition of social marketing and its potential impact. Learn about recent social marketing campaigns in the U.S. and abroad. Gain knowledge of the steps involved in social marketing: from understanding your audience to evaluating your success. The importance of partnerships and events for social marketing success will also be discussed. An example of work in a SOC will be presented including gathering data on audiences and employing successful communications strategies.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Lessons and Examples for State and Local Advocacy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Sue Lynn Ledford, DrPH, MPA, BSN, RN; Alisahah Cole, MD; Gary Gunderson, DMin, DDiv. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: In turbulent political times, crafting public health messages that resonate across differing political ideologies is more important and challenging than ever. In this webinar, the presenters offer practical examples of how public health issues have been effectively communicated across party lines in the politically divided state of North Carolina through the application of Moral Foundations Theory. Examples include successfully advocating for sterile needle exchange, invoking community loyalty to support healthcare system collaborations using GIS mapping, and developing partnerships with faith communities to promote health. Based on these examples and a wealth of experience, the presenters will provide public health practitioners and advocates with tools, advice and strategies to assist them in looking deeper into distressed communities to understand the community’s values, needs, and complexity, and to focus locally to design solutions alongside diverse coalitions that may include faith networks, law enforcement, healthcare providers, and other (sometimes unexpected) stakeholders.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

The Use of Social Media to Enhance Communication and Dissemination. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Association of University Centers on Disabilities. Presenter(s): Courtney Taylor, Emma Shouse, Elizabeth Bishop, Francisca Guzman, Crystal K. Pariseau. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 73 minutes.

Annotation: In today's technological driven society, the use of social media continues to increase and impact the disability world. Social media has certainly become a means to communicate and disseminate information. This webinar features a panel of AUCD and Developmental Disabilities Network Partners and discusses some innovative statewide and national collaborations.

Communicating Public Health: Message Design Strategies to Promote Awareness and Action to Address Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Jeff Niederdeppe. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: In an event co-sponsored by the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion, guest lecturer Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe from Cornell University presents an overview of how public health communication can assist in addressing social determinants of health and health disparities. He begins the lecture by focusing on what should be communicated in public health messaging and to whom, what situations you are trying to change with your health communications, and knowing what barriers you face in communicating your message.

Learning Objectives: • An understanding that education and awareness may not be enough. • The importance of connecting messages to broader values. • The understanding that opposing messengers are a challenge.

Strategies for Successful Public Health Messaging. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Tim Church; James Apa. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar delves into ideas of effective communication, credibility, and the use of social media in creating effective public health campaigns. It explores how audiences receive messages and are motivated for action. Tim Church and James Apa each speak about the high-tech and low-tech strategies that public health organizations should use in sharing public messages to the public across the different phases of a public health event. They also speak about the importance of social media, websites, and partnerships (local, community, medical, media) to target and disseminate public health messages.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize what determines credibility in high and low concern settings. • Identify effective ways to inform the public about developing public health issues. • Describe the importance of working with other partners in disseminating public health information and messages. • Identify how public health messaging needs to change during different phases of a public health event.

Special Instructions: Need to register/log in to access.

Communicating Science: Translating Research for Policy and Practice. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 19 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the rationales for and barriers to taking action to ensure that public health science is communicated beyond academic journals and applied to efforts to improve health for individuals and populations. Cameo video commentary from public information staff of the Institute of Medicine is used to share strategies for being competitive in the marketplace of ideas that interventions and policies are derived from. Downloadable slides and a transcript of the presentation are provided at <http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/writing-skills/Transcript-Translational-Writing.pdf>.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the importance of translating research. • Understand the characteristics of both academic researchers and policymakers. • Learn best practices for health professionals to communicate science for use in policy and practice.

Storytelling as Best Practice. Year Developed: 2012. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Andy Goodman. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Andy Goodman addresses why storytelling is important for public health practice and how to utilize it within the field. He begins by describing why narrative is a powerful persuader and what kinds of stories help make a point. Using organizational identity, Mr. Goodman describes how to build a culture around storytelling. The presentation also highlights MCH organizations that effectively incorporate storytelling into their mission as well as on their website. A question and answer session, slides, and transcripts are available.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why storytelling is the single most powerful communication tool ever created. • Learn specific ways to use stories to advance an organization's mission.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation slides and audio, click on “Presentation Slides” and “Listen to the Recording” under “Materials.” [Note: Need Windows Media Player for audio].

Social Media: Changing Communication and Interventions in Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This broadcast introduces public health workers to the various social media tools that are available, the demographics that use these tools, and the benefits and drawbacks of using each of them. Speakers discuss specific strategies used and share both success stories in using social media, as well as important lessons learned in overcoming barriers, maximizing efficiency, and discovering the most effective way to use the available tools to impact public health outcomes.

Guidelines for Effective Presentations. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Presenter(s): Heidi Hisey. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: In this webinar, the presenter provides an overview on how to create a clear and effective presentation. She discusses how to use animation, best practices when presenting data and provides options for presenting a variety of information.

Learning Objectives: •Provide tips to make a clear and organized presentation. •Describe options for presenting a variety of information. •Learn guidelines for presenting data. •Learn how to effectively use animation.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.