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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 21 found.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

The Use of Social Media to Enhance Communication and Dissemination. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Association of University Centers on Disabilities. Presenter(s): Courtney Taylor, Emma Shouse, Elizabeth Bishop, Francisca Guzman, Crystal K. Pariseau. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 73 minutes.

Annotation: In today's technological driven society, the use of social media continues to increase and impact the disability world. Social media has certainly become a means to communicate and disseminate information. This webinar features a panel of AUCD and Developmental Disabilities Network Partners and discusses some innovative statewide and national collaborations.

Begin Your Path to Capitalizing the Cloud. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Govloop. Presenter(s): Pat Florenza, Sherwin McAdam. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Every agency, state and city is looking for that game changing "do more with less" tool. When implemented correctly, the cloud can be that tool. It can transform a government agency. The cloud allows us to easily collaborate, share resources, receive on demand computing power, and change the way we deliver services to citizens. This webinar, presented by government and industry thought leaders discusses the following: • How the cloud is transforming government • Best practices and strategies to adopt the right cloud solution for your agency. • Case studies and lessons learned from agencies that have successfully deployed the cloud.

Strategies for Successful Public Health Messaging. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Tim Church; James Apa. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar delves into ideas of effective communication, credibility, and the use of social media in creating effective public health campaigns. It explores how audiences receive messages and are motivated for action. Tim Church and James Apa each speak about the high-tech and low-tech strategies that public health organizations should use in sharing public messages to the public across the different phases of a public health event. They also speak about the importance of social media, websites, and partnerships (local, community, medical, media) to target and disseminate public health messages.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize what determines credibility in high and low concern settings. • Identify effective ways to inform the public about developing public health issues. • Describe the importance of working with other partners in disseminating public health information and messages. • Identify how public health messaging needs to change during different phases of a public health event.

Special Instructions: Need to register/log in to access.

Communicating Science: Translating Research for Policy and Practice. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Slide Module. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 19 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the rationales for and barriers to taking action to ensure that public health science is communicated beyond academic journals and applied to efforts to improve health for individuals and populations. Cameo video commentary from public information staff of the Institute of Medicine is used to share strategies for being competitive in the marketplace of ideas that interventions and policies are derived from. Downloadable slides and a transcript of the presentation are provided at <http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/writing-skills/Transcript-Translational-Writing.pdf>.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the importance of translating research. • Understand the characteristics of both academic researchers and policymakers. • Learn best practices for health professionals to communicate science for use in policy and practice.

Writing Briefing Memos. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation focuses on the nature, elements and specific uses of briefing memos, and tips for writing good ones. By comparing memo writing to the Ikea business model, Ms. Ruderman discusses solutions to writing an effective memo, including using clear visual cues and logical paths, focusing on the memo’s purpose, avoiding jargon, simplifying sentence structure, and presenting and concluding data effectively.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what a briefing memo is and why you would write one. • Describe the IKEA Effect. • Learn how to present data effectively.

Storytelling as Best Practice. Year Developed: 2012. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Andy Goodman. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Andy Goodman addresses why storytelling is important for public health practice and how to utilize it within the field. He begins by describing why narrative is a powerful persuader and what kinds of stories help make a point. Using organizational identity, Mr. Goodman describes how to build a culture around storytelling. The presentation also highlights MCH organizations that effectively incorporate storytelling into their mission as well as on their website. A question and answer session, slides, and transcripts are available.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why storytelling is the single most powerful communication tool ever created. • Learn specific ways to use stories to advance an organization's mission.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation slides and audio, click on “Presentation Slides” and “Listen to the Recording” under “Materials.” [Note: Need Windows Media Player for audio].

Social Media: Changing Communication and Interventions in Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This broadcast introduces public health workers to the various social media tools that are available, the demographics that use these tools, and the benefits and drawbacks of using each of them. Speakers discuss specific strategies used and share both success stories in using social media, as well as important lessons learned in overcoming barriers, maximizing efficiency, and discovering the most effective way to use the available tools to impact public health outcomes.

Guidelines for Effective Presentations. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Presenter(s): Heidi Hisey. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: In this webinar, the presenter provides an overview on how to create a clear and effective presentation. She discusses how to use animation, best practices when presenting data and provides options for presenting a variety of information.

Learning Objectives: •Provide tips to make a clear and organized presentation. •Describe options for presenting a variety of information. •Learn guidelines for presenting data. •Learn how to effectively use animation.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Writing Policy Briefs: A Guide to Translating Science and Engaging Stakeholders. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Advanced. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: The challenges, art and craft of writing documents intended to translate science to action (policy, programs, services) are the subjects of this distance education module. While the primary intended audiences are public health students and practicing professionals, faculty at public health and other MCH training and education programs may find useful tools in this module. Learning objectives give emphasis to basic elements and structure of policy briefs, and to skills development in synthesizing data and information in order to communicate effectively with non-science audiences. The module offers an introductory lecture, examples of the skills in action, and structured exercises for completing the process of writing your own policy brief.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the basic elements of a policy brief. • Identify the information needs of different audiences. • Synthesize data to convey policy implications. • Craft concise language. • Organize information effectively.

Special Instructions: To access video, click “Play Lecture” next to “A. Video Lecture: The Art and Craft of Policy Briefs.”

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.