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Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Integrating Early Childhood Data. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Dabney, Carlise King. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: Data from both the early childhood and K–12 sectors can help policymakers inform policy discussions and funding decisions; chart the progress of children, programs, and the state; strengthen and support the early childhood workforce; and pinpoint best practices and areas of need. Linking limited, but critical, early childhood and K–12 data can help states know whether policies and programs successfully transition children from early childhood to the classroom and get them ready for school. During the webinar hear from the Early Childhood Data Collaborative and Data Quality Campaign about how state legislators and policymakers can support the linkage and use of early childhood and K-12 data to inform policy and improve child outcomes.

Evidence-Based Public Health Training Series. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Advanced. Length: 555 minutes.

Annotation: Today's public health professionals must be able to strategically consider research results, political interests, and community requests when leading program and policy work. The evidence-based public health framework is an effective model for this type of decision-making. The Evidence-Based Public Health Training Series consists of nine modules that cover core concepts, such as defining public health issues, conducting community assessments, prioritizing options, and evaluating program and policy impacts. You may take each of the modules individually and receive a certificate for each one. If you choose to complete all nine modules, you will also receive a certificate for the series as a whole. Each module consists of several videos, followed by a short quiz. You must watch the videos and take the quiz in order to pass the module. To aid in your understanding, optional activities and questions for reflection or discussion are also included with each module. You may discuss these questions in a forum with other module participants or with peers or colleagues, or you may reflect on them individually.

Special Instructions: Must create a PH Learn Link account to view.

Evaluation Learning Bundle. Year Developed: 2017. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson, PhD; John Richards, MA, AITP. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This learning bundle uses the CDC framework as a conceptual model to organize learning opportunities. It presents introductions to the six steps of program evaluation in short video podcasts. You can also download materials from the CDC about each step. After reviewing the introductory material, you can access additional learning opportunities to gain knowledge and skills related to each step of the framework. For additional resources this learning bundle also includes an Evaluation Toolkit developed by NCEMCH that includes an evaluation primer, a collection of key resources, and an interactive Choose-and-Use tool to assist users in finding instructions on how to conduct evaluations and examples of successful evaluations from the field.

Building Logic Models. Year Developed: 2017. Source: New York City, Long Island, Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: In this training program, students will build a logic model based on a scenario – ranging from simple to complex. Students must correctly identify the components in the scenario that belong in the program’s logic model and enter those components into the appropriate place in the logic model framework. This program is ideal for those interested in practicing and enhancing their logic model building skills as part of designing and/or evaluating a program. This course has been revised as of August 31st, 2017 to incorporate scenarios related to food policy and social determinants of health and to improve the interactive components of the logic model activity.

Learning Objectives: • Construct a public health program logic model based on given program information.

Continuing Education: 1 CPHCE

The SOC (Systems of Care) Approach. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: The SOC Approach Curriculum was developed to assist communities, states, tribes and territories understand the What, Why and How of System of Care Expansion and help them implement, improve, sustain, and expand Systems of Care for children, youth, and young adults with behavioral health challenges. This curriculum was adapted from the Expanding the System of Care Approach Toolkit (2015) authored by Beth Stroul, M.Ed., Joan Dodge, PhD, Sybil Goldman, MSW, Frank Rider, MS and Robert Friedman, PhD. It consists of these 7 modules: (1) The What and Why of the Systems of Care Approach; (2) The SOC Practice Approach; (3) The Beginning; (4) Strategies of SOC Expansion; (5) Progress and Outcome Assessment; (6) Trauma Informed Systems; and (7) The Most Essential Component of the Systems of Care Approach.

Special Instructions: Requires an account with edX edge plus enrollment in each module

Continuing Education: The modules include mastery tests for credit (type not specified).

Quality in Public Health, Unit B. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): N/A. Type: Video Slide Module. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: This module provides key definitions and concepts for performance measurement. Learn practical tips for selecting and using quality and performance measurement to effectively monitor system performance. A step-by-step example illustrates the process and provides a reference for implementation.

Learning Objectives: • Understand important quality measurement terms and concepts • Apply the following practical measurement strategies: Preserving the context Listening to the Voice of the Process Knowing when to bundle and unbundle data Using a balanced set of measures Differentiating types of measures and their uses Implementing a measurement system, not just measures

Quality in Public Health, Unit A. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): N/A. Type: Video Slide Module. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: This module provides a description of key characteristics of quality, quality assurance, and quality improvement. Explore different approaches (Lean, Six Sigma, etc.) that can be used in public health to improve quality and walk through examples that apply the concepts and tools.​

Learning Objectives: • Describe characteristics of quality, including consistency, timeliness, stakeholder expectations, and technical specifications. • Compare Quality Assurance (QA)/Quality Control (QC) and Quality Improvement. • Explore methods and approaches to improve quality, including the PDSA Cycle, Lean Thinking, Six Sigma, Total Quality Management, and theories of Organizational Effectiveness. • Consider how quality methods may be applied in public health. • Describe the quality continuum, the performance management cycle, and open feedback systems​.

Qualitative Methods for Public Health: An Overview and Introduction. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): Hannah Cooper, ScD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: n.a.. List of Webinar Archives from MCHB

Annotation: This webinar discussed how to critically assess the strengths and weakness of qualitative research papers and evaluation projects. Webinar addresses how to contribute to the development of a qualitative research or evaluation project.

Learning Objectives: • Critically assess the strengths and weakness of qualitative research papers and evaluation projects. • Contribute to the development of a qualitative research or evaluation project.

Being Effective in Public Health: Public Health Planning Process: Key to a Useful Needs Assessment. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CityMatCH. Presenter(s): William M. Sappenfield, MD, MPH; Pat O'Campo. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: 69 slides. Audio

Annotation: This pre-course webinar for the 2015 Training Course in MCH Epidemiology provides an overview of needs assessment and how it fits into an effective planning cycle. This is followed by an overview of program evaluation, including logic models. Slides and audio are maintained in two separate links. A chart on types of evaluation is provided at this URL: http://www.citymatch.org/sites/default/files/documents/MCHEPITraining/2015/Webinar%203_May%2021/Evaluation%20Types%20%26%20Purpose%201%20pager%20hand%20out.pdf.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.