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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 21 found.

Peer Parent Support in Wraparound: Evolution, Promises, and Challenges. Year Developed: 2020. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Patricia Miles. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar provides an overview of high quality and purposeful peer support for parents, as well as a brief history of how Peer Parent Support has been integrated into Wraparound projects. Presenters will provide an evolution of peer parent support and the various ways it has been implemented within a Wraparound structure. They discuss the history of implementation strategies that have been tried over the past twenty-five years, reviewing challenges and lessons learned.

Policy 101 Learning Bundle. Year Developed: 2019. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Self-Assessment data gathered by MCH Navigator staff have shown that knowledge and self-efficacy surrounding the policy-making process is the least understood of the 12 MCH Leadership Competencies. To address this need, we have pulled together these 10 learning opportunities represent some of the most relevant and/or recent online trainings in the field and have been chosen based on their ease of access, focus, brevity, and their integration with principles necessary to advance the transformation of the MCH Block Grant. Trainings have been identified by MCH Navigator staff and further vetted by a group of MCH experts in the states and in academic settings.

Improving Your Injury and Violence Prevention Practice: How the Core Competencies Can Work for You. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Southeastern and Southwestern Injury Prevention Alliance and Safe States Alliance. Presenter(s): Shelli Stephens-Stidham, Tom Songer, Mary Ann Contreras, Kristen Lindemer. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes. webinar

Annotation: This is Webinar #1 in a six-part series entitled “Improving your Injury and Violence Prevention Practice with the Core Competencies.” The series is presented by the Southeastern and Southwestern Injury Prevention Network and the Safe States Alliance. In this webinar series, experienced professionals in the field discuss how they use the Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention (IVP) to develop and advance their own skills, as well as those of staff they manage. The Core Competencies can provide a roadmap for gaining or strengthening the essential knowledge, skills and behaviors needed to grow professionally; develop, implement and evaluate IVP programs and policies; and strengthen the field and practice of IVP. Webinar #1 provides the rational for this series, highlighting the ways the competencies can help participants in their work. Webinars #2-6 address Core Competencies for IVP #1-7, and core competencies #8-9 are addressed throughout each presentation. This webinar series is relevant to those with a variety of experiences and/or years of service, including: – Professionals working in IVP and/or other areas of public health – Individuals anywhere along the spectrum of professional development –those new to public health and/or IVP, and those who have been working for several years and want to further develop their competencies.

Learning Objectives: • Gain an understanding of how the core competencies can help you to develop professionally and improve your IVP work. • Learn about and be able to explain the common competencies used in unintentional and intentional injury prevention. • Understand how the competencies cross-link injury and violence prevention to the broader practice of public health and the delivery of essential public health services in any program area or setting. • Understand the relevance of core competencies within the context of the history of injury and violence prevention through the stories of experienced professionals. • Understand the organization, purpose and key content of each session in this webinar series.

Building Logic Models. Year Developed: 2017. Source: New York City, Long Island, Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: In this training program, students will build a logic model based on a scenario – ranging from simple to complex. Students must correctly identify the components in the scenario that belong in the program’s logic model and enter those components into the appropriate place in the logic model framework. This program is ideal for those interested in practicing and enhancing their logic model building skills as part of designing and/or evaluating a program. This course has been revised as of August 31st, 2017 to incorporate scenarios related to food policy and social determinants of health and to improve the interactive components of the logic model activity.

Learning Objectives: • Construct a public health program logic model based on given program information.

Continuing Education: 1 CPHCE

Performance Measures in Public Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Public Health Centers for Excellence. Presenter(s): Public Health Centers for Excellence. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 8 minutes.

Annotation: This introductory video explains the basics of performance measurement; the importance of performance measurement; when to use performance measures; and how to develop good performance measures.

Learning Objectives: • Define performance measurement. • Learn why performance measurement is important. • Understand when to use performance measures. • Discuss steps to developing good performance measures.

Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions for New Populations and Settings. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rachel C. Shelton, ScD, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. TRAIN.org link

Annotation: Dissemination and implementation sciences are defined as the systematic study of how a specific set of activities and designated strategies are used to successfully adopt and integrate an evidence-based public health intervention (EBI) within specific settings, and are comprised of four steps: 1) exploration, 2) adoption/preparation, 3) implementation, and 4) sustainment. The overall goal is to reduce the gap between science and practice/policy. Implementation research speaks more to processes and factors associated with successful integration of EBIs within a particular setting, while dissemination research focuses on the processes and factors that lead to widespread adoption and use of EBIs. EBIs are shaped by research evidence, resources, population, and context, and are popularly used due to their demonstrated effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and fast process. In order to successfully select an EBI, interventionists must Identify community needs, assess organizational capacity, and search program registries to select a program. When preparing for implementation, and EBI can either be adopted as is or adapted to fit the local conditions. Adaptation is an important part of the process in order to enhance engagement, reach the audience, address disparities, increase fit and relevance, and reinforce the message. Adaptations can be either surface or deep structure, and the use of either or both should be a conscious, well thought out decision. Surface adaptations use visual and auditory cues for culturally appropriate messages, while deep structure adaptations involves cultural sensitivity and comprehensive understanding of ethnic group’s core cultural values, norms, and stressors (economic, social, environmental) affecting health behaviors. Models for guiding adaptation include Card, ADAPT-ITT, and MAP.

Continuing Education: 1 CHES; 1 CPHCE

Title V Five Year Needs Assessment Training: Part 2: Nuts and Bolts on Using Data. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Samara Viner-Brown, MS; Yvonne Goldsmith, Caroline Stampfel, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 59 minutes. Course Resources

Annotation: Title V legislation requires each state and jurisdiction to conduct a state-wide, comprehensive needs assessment every five years. The needs assessment process can be a useful tool for strategic planning, strategic decision-making and resource allocation. It also provides a way for Title V programs to benchmark where they are and assess progress over a five-year period. To assist states or jurisdictions in preparing their assessments AMCHP hosted a series of virtual trainings to provide guidance on the needs assessment process. The second webinar, The Nuts and Bolts on Using Data, features a presentation from Caroline Stampfel, MPH, currently the Senior Epidemiologist at AMCHP and formerly an MCH Lead Analyst with the Virginia Title V program, on using data in the needs assessment process. Ms. Stampfel’s presentation is followed by two states-in-action profiles, Rhode Island and Alaska, who shared their data strategies, resources, and lessons learned from conducting the five-year needs assessment process. In order to capitalize on the information presented in the virtual training, AMCHP recommended that states consider team participation in the training, i.e., participation from both program and data staff.

Learning Objectives: • Give examples of effective uses of qualitative and quantitative data sources for the needs assessment. • Begin to identify possible frameworks to organize needs assessment data. • Develop next steps/strategies for using data in their own Title V five year needs assessment.

Title V Five Year Needs Assessment Training. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Donna Petersen, ScD, MHS, CPH; Ron Benham, MDiv; Karin Downs, RN, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes. Course Resources

Annotation: Title V legislation requires each state and jurisdiction to conduct a state-wide, comprehensive needs assessment every five years. The needs assessment process can be a useful tool for strategic planning, strategic decision-making and resource allocation. It also provides a way for Title V programs to benchmark where they are and assess progress over a five-year period. This archived webinar provides an overview of the needs assessment process with a presentation from Donna Petersen, ScD, MHS, CPH, Dean for the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida. Dr. Petersen presented on the “Nuts and Bolts of the Five Year Needs Assessment”, followed by a state-in-action example from Massachusetts. The Massachusetts MCH team shared their strategies, resources and lessons learned from conducting the five-year needs assessment process. Training Resources include participant pre-work; webinar slides; a resource list developed by the MCH Navigator and MCH Library; and materials from Massachusetts and are available from AMCHP's Course Resources page (above).

Learning Objectives: • Describe the Title V five-year needs assessment purpose and goals. • Articulate the major components of a comprehensive needs assessment. • Develop next steps/strategies for their five-year needs assessment plan.

The Nuts and Bolts of the PHAB Accreditation Process. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Public Health Accreditation Board. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This module gives health department leaders, Accreditation Coordinators, and accreditation team members a beginning base of knowledge about what is involved in leading their health department through the accreditation process. While targeting Accreditation Coordinators, it gives anyone an idea of what a health department must do to prepare and begin the PHAB accreditation process.

Learning Objectives: • List the different types of information that will be required to include in the PHAB application. • Describe the accreditation process and the responsibilities of the accreditation coordinator in each of the steps. • State the three pre-requisites and the corresponding PHAB standard.

Continuing Education: 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s), 0.75 ANCC contact hours, 1.00 hour of participation, 1.00 hour of Public Health Continuing Education (CPHCE) credit; expires 9/29/2017.

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part II - The Budget. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: All in the practice of public health know the importance of financial resources to carry out their activities. This very basic introduction course provides a definition of the growing field of public health finance, assists students to develop a working knowledge of the planning cycles in governmental public health organizations, understand how to navigate and use budget planning documents, forecasts, governmental financial statements, and grants to support important public health activities and priorities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance • Describe the Minnesota budget and forecast process • Explore public finance using examples from Minnesota health department s budget • Develop an understanding of financial statements • Understand the basics of grant proposals

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.