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Displaying records 1 through 7 of 7 found.

Local Health Policy 101: Understanding Ordinances, Resolutions, and Proclamations. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Jill Krueger, JD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: Attend this webinar, co-sponsored by the Network for Public Health Law and the National Association of Local Boards of Health (NALBOH), to learn about public health legal and policy innovations in small-town and medium-sized communities, as well as in the nation's largest cities, to address issues such as child poverty, tobacco control, environmental health and mental health. A video and slides are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the role of a local board of health, health department, city/ county government, and legal counsel with regard to reviewing and updating public health laws. • Explain the difference between advisory authority and policy-making authority, and how differing authority might make a resolution, proclamation, or ordinance an appropriate legal tool. • List resources for researching local public health laws and policies. • Identify examples of legal and policy innovations in the areas of child poverty, healthy eating, active living, tobacco control, environmental health, and mental health in rural, suburban, and urban communities.

Continuing Education: CLS credit may be available. Inquire to the network for details.

The Constitutional and Legal Basis for Public Health Actions. Year Developed: 2011. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: A basic understanding of public health law is essential to the practice of public health across our nation. States and local units of government have unique authority to maintain and protect the health of the people who live within their jurisdictions. However to exercise these powers, we must understand them and use them within the boundaries of the constitution and legal authority. This course will provide some very basic tools to develop a greater appreciation and understanding of the authority we have to protect the public health while maintaining the appropriate respect for individual rights that must be balanced in any of our actions.

Learning Objectives: • Have a basic understanding of the constitutional and regulatory powers in public health and how these powers are applied in public health situations and activities. • Be able to critically analyze various public health situations and activities by balancing the rights of individuals with the legal powers and duties to assure optimum population health.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 1 Certification; 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 Contact Hours

Practical Law for Public Health Officials. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Jeffrey Killip, JD, MPH and Susan Allan, MD, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Do you know how the law contributed to motor vehicle safety, vaccination, or safer workplaces? Law reform or litigation has played a part in most of the greatest public health achievements in the 20th century. As public health professionals and leaders, understanding public health law and how to use it is essential to protecting the public’s health. In this module, you will learn how to assess when to involve legal counsel, how to get effective legal advice, and what laws will affect your decision-making ability when facing public health threats. By the end, you will be able to use core concepts of public health law to more effectively protect the public’s health while avoiding legal trouble.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize legal issues. • Formulate legal questions. • Implement effective strategies for working with legal counsel. • Describe key principles of public health law. • Identify key public health laws that govern leadership’s responsibilities, authority, and limitations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 1.5 CNE Contact Hours

Basic Epidemiology. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center. Presenter(s): Iowa Department of Public Health. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive course introduces the field of epidemiology and its practice in the field of public health. The first module presents definitions of important terms, including determinants, transmission, case, communicability, prevalence, and incidence. Next, the course describes two models of the infectious disease process: (1) chain of infections and (2) the Epi Triangle (agent, host and environment). The third module describes the practice of epidemiology, with particular focus on outbreak investigation. Finally, the course concludes with an overview of surveillance, defining different types and components of successful systems. Examples, short quizzes and a post-test are used to reinforce learning.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss important terms and concepts for basic epidemiology practice. • Describe the inter-related aspects of the infectious disease process and methods of breaking this "chain" of infection. • Understand basic epidemiology in practice, using a case study of a food-borne outbreak as an example. • Perform basic surveillance tasks in an appropriate and timely manner. Utilize your regional epidemiologist as a resource for outbreak investigations.

Special Instructions: Registration to the Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center is required. Click "My Account" under the LMS Navigation. Click on "Create new account". Click on "Online Courses". Search for "Basic Epidemiology" and choose Epidemiology for the category.

Systems Thinking for Maternal and Child Health: Applications in Practice. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Systems thinking and using the systems approach to manage public health controversies can provide new and exciting opportunities and collaborations, yet the importance of this concept is often overlooked. Many disciplines converge in this problem-solving approach and bring new ideas to the forefront of today’s critical public health issues. In this seminar, Dr. Donna Petersen will explore how systems thinking can be applied to Maternal and Child Health and analyze the advantages of using this method to solve current and future challenges in public health.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 1 Certificate of Attendance

Study Types in Epidemiology. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): John Kobayashi, MD, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This module introduces learners to epidemiologic designs and their uses. First, the course describes the goals of epidemiology studies, and then defines the information needed to answer the “five W’s” (what, who, where, when and why). Next, the module describes the differences between descriptive and analytic studies, and gives examples of study designs within each category, using the recent SARS outbreak to illustrate concepts. Learning is reinforced with short exercises and a final assessment.

Learning Objectives: • List the differences between descriptive and analytic epidemiology • Describe the main types of epidemiologic studies and their uses • Identify and provide examples of person, place, and time in descriptive studies • Describe the main differences among case-control, cohort studies, and environmental studies

Special Instructions: Registration is required. Look to the right of the screen and click on "Register in PHLearnLink".

Continuing Education: Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) credits are available. Participants who successfully complete the course are eligible to receive a certificate for 1.0 contact hours for a processing fee of $35.

Public Health Policy and Advocacy: Building Advocacy Skills for Social Change . Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Traci Toomey, PhD, MPH; Jeff Nachbar. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: This module is framed around specific professionals’ experiences of how to reach policy-makers. Differences between lobbying types and tools to advocate for social change are discussed, as well as the formal legislative process of how bills and laws are created. Legislators and representatives are also interviewed on their opinions about how to best influence policy-makers. A pre and post assessment is available.

Learning Objectives: • Define health policy and explain the importance of advocacy to make social change. • Describe the legislative process, including how a bill becomes a law. • Discuss various tools that can be used to advocate for social change at the legislative level. • Describe what influences policy makers.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required. For new users click here to register. Scroll down to "Public Health Policy and Advocacy: Building Advocacy Skills for Social Change". (https://cpheo1.sph.umn.edu/login/?desturl=https%3A%2F%2Fcpheo1%2Esph%2Eumn%2Eedu%2FMCLPH%2FIntroEpi%2Easp)

Continuing Education: 1 Continuing Education Hour Available

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.