Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 10 found.

Family-Centered Care Training Brief. Year Developed: 2015. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on learning opportunities aimed to assist MCH professionals increase their knowledge and skills of the family-centered system of care and improve the health outcomes of women, children and families.

An Introduction to the PHAB Accreditation Process. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Public Health Accreditation Board. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: This online course details knowledge of the seven distinct steps and timeline of the PHAB accreditation process that begin with preparatory work, leading to an accreditation decision, then ending with reaccreditation.

Learning Objectives: • List the steps of the accreditation process • Describe the three prerequisites required at the time of application • Define the purpose of the Readiness Checklists and the Statement of Intent

Continuing Education: 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s), 1.00 ANCC contact hours, 0.75 hours of participation, 1.00 hour of Public Health Continuing Education (CPHCE) credit; expires 9/29/2017

More than Money: The Keys to Achieving Long-Term Sustainability. Year Developed: 2013. Source: National Healthy Tomorrows Technical Assistance Resource Center at the American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Kevin D. Monroe. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Webinar 1: 65 minutes; webinar 2: 50 minutes; webinar 3: 66 minutes; webinar 4: 70 minutes.

Annotation: This four-part webinar series focuses on providing the public health community with practical knowledge on sustainability based on Mr. Monroe's "fundamental principles and practices to promote program sustainability" -- Results, Resources, and Relationships. These webinars are meant to apply broadly to Healthy Tomorrows projects and can be extrapolated to other Title V programs. Webinars include: (1) How to Package, Promote, or Re-Purpose Outcomes as Results; (2) Strategies for Sustaining Vital Program Resources; (3) How to Mine, Map, and Mobilize Relationships for Sustainability; and (4) How to Implement your Sustainability Plan. Sponsored in part by the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

Learning Objectives: Webinar 1: How to Package, Promote, or Re-Purpose Outcomes as Results: • Identify four key sustainability strategies related to Healthy Tomorrow outcomes and results. • Recognize that not all outcomes are equal and the three types of high-impact outcomes. • Consider ways to package and promote existing outcomes to garner the attention of potential supporters and investors. Webinar 2: Strategies for Sustaining Vital Program Resources: • Identify four key sustainability strategies related to Healthy Tomorrow resources. • Describe an asset-based approach to resource development. • Consider options for implementing a relationally rich approach to resource development. Webinar 3: How to Mine, Map, and Mobilize Relationships for Sustainability: • Identify three key trends. • Consider ways to mine, map, and mobilize grantees' sustainability networks. • Analyze the level of involvement of key stakeholders and partners in sustainability network. Webinar 4: How to Implement your Sustainability Plan: • Understand the virtuous cycle of results, resources, and relationships • Identify essential elements necessary for effective team approaches to sustainability planning. • Evaluate the progress of your sustainability planning efforts.

Evaluating a Public Health Program. Year Developed: 2011. Source: New York - New Jersey Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online course is the last in a series of trainings dealing with the development and evaluation of public health programs. This training serves as a comprehensive tutorial on the Evaluation of a Public Health Program. The process of Program Evaluation continues the use of pertussis reduction in Lakeshore County as an example program and utilizes the logic model developed in the "Introduction to Logic Models" training. The primary focus of the course is to explore the six steps and the four standard groups in the Center for Disease Control's Framework for Program Evaluation. This framework represents all of the activities prescribed by the CDC in Program Evaluation, along with sensible guidance under the standards to aid in good decision-making.

Learning Objectives: • List six steps in the CDC Framework for Program Evaluation. • Apply the four standards in the CDC Framework for Program Evaluation. • Identify stakeholders roles and responsibilities. • Compose evaluation questions to focus the evaluation. • Recognize process and outcome indicators. • Compare and contrast methods for gathering evidence. • Recognize sources used in identifying program standards. • Discuss strategies to disseminate findings and share lessons learned.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: 1 CHES; 1 CME; 1 CNE Contact Hours

A General Overview of Public Health Accreditation. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Public Health Accreditation Board. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This module provides an overview of the entire public health department accreditation process. Despite the important role public health departments play in our communities, there has not been a national system for ensuring their accountability and quality—until now. Other community services and organizations, such as schools, daycare centers, police departments, and hospitals, have seen the value of accreditation. Now, there is an opportunity for public health departments to have their performance measured, demonstrate accountability within their communities, and show a measurable return on investment in public health and prevention.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the mission and purpose of PHAB. • Describe why accreditation is important. • List the benefits of accreditation. • Identify basic concepts of the accreditation process. • State the number of domains in the PHAB standards and measures.

Continuing Education: 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s), 0.75 ANCC contact hours, 0.75 hours of participation, 1.00 hour of Public Health Continuing Education (CPHCE) credit

Public Health Services and Systems Research: State of the Field . Year Developed: 2010. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Glen Mays, PhD, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Practice-based research is an effective way to better understand our current public health systems and where opportunities for improvement exist. In this one hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Glen Mays, PhD, MPH, provides a brief overview of the history and current rationale for practice-based research, an examination of topics and methodologies currently used in the field, and a perspective on where practice-based research should move. He will also talk about how findings from prior studies of public health systems and services can be applied within real-world practice settings, and help identify gaps in the public health evidence base that can be informed through systems and services research. Slides and a recording are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how findings from prior studies of public health systems and services can be applied within real-world public health settings • Identify gaps in the evidence base for public health practice that can be informed through the lens of public health systems and services research • Describe strategies for engaging public health practitioners in the design and implementation of practice-based studies

Basic Epidemiology. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center. Presenter(s): Iowa Department of Public Health. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive course introduces the field of epidemiology and its practice in the field of public health. The first module presents definitions of important terms, including determinants, transmission, case, communicability, prevalence, and incidence. Next, the course describes two models of the infectious disease process: (1) chain of infections and (2) the Epi Triangle (agent, host and environment). The third module describes the practice of epidemiology, with particular focus on outbreak investigation. Finally, the course concludes with an overview of surveillance, defining different types and components of successful systems. Examples, short quizzes and a post-test are used to reinforce learning.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss important terms and concepts for basic epidemiology practice. • Describe the inter-related aspects of the infectious disease process and methods of breaking this "chain" of infection. • Understand basic epidemiology in practice, using a case study of a food-borne outbreak as an example. • Perform basic surveillance tasks in an appropriate and timely manner. Utilize your regional epidemiologist as a resource for outbreak investigations.

Special Instructions: Registration to the Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center is required. Click "My Account" under the LMS Navigation. Click on "Create new account". Click on "Online Courses". Search for "Basic Epidemiology" and choose Epidemiology for the category.

Logic Models and Outcome Measurement. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This online module defines outcome measurement and its importance to evaluation in the public health field. Dr. Bekemeier discusses the difference between performance measurement, evaluation, and logic models. Examples of running a marathon and managing an immunization clinic are used to describe the components of a logic model and how it can be used to assess the results of our interventions. Strategies for writing measureable outcomes compared to goal statements concludes the module.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the components and uses of a logic model. • Define outcome measurements and why they are important. • Differentiate between indicators and outcome measures. • Describe potential uses of outcome measures. • Identify measurable outcomes. • Determine levels (e.g., community, system, agency, program) of outcomes. • Identify outcomes vs. goals and objectives.

Special Instructions: Registration is required. Look to the right of your screen and click "Register in PHLearnLink".

Continuing Education: Participants who successfully complete the course are eligible to receive a certificate for 0.75 contact hours for a processing fee of $35.

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Three -- Process Evaluation. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Francoise Grossmann, RN, MPH. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This session discusses the importance of process evaluation in understanding the context of program implementation. This session introduces the Family Nurse Partnership program to illustrate process evaluation findings. Participants get to formulate process evaluation questions and indicators for the Child Wellness Program.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the importance of conducting process evaluation. • Describe the key components of process evaluation. • Apply your knowledge to identify and formulate process evaluation questions for the Child Wellness Program.

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Four -- Outcome Evaluation . Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Francoise Grossmann, RN, MPH. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This session discusses the importance of outcome evaluation in establishing a causal link between an intervention and observed results. The first part of this session focuses on identifying proper outcome measures; the second part focuses on the different types of evaluation designs. Participants get to formulate outcome evaluation questions and identify an evaluation design for the Child Wellness Program.

Learning Objectives: • Define the purpose of outcome evaluation. • Identify and formulate outcome evaluation questions. • Identify selection of evaluation designs. • Describe most common bias to internal validity. • Apply knowledge to identify and formulate outcome evaluation questions for the Child Wellness Program.

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.