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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 20 found.

Practical Law for Public Health Officials. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Jeffrey Killip, JD, MPH and Susan Allan, MD, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Do you know how the law contributed to motor vehicle safety, vaccination, or safer workplaces? Law reform or litigation has played a part in most of the greatest public health achievements in the 20th century. As public health professionals and leaders, understanding public health law and how to use it is essential to protecting the public’s health. In this module, you will learn how to assess when to involve legal counsel, how to get effective legal advice, and what laws will affect your decision-making ability when facing public health threats. By the end, you will be able to use core concepts of public health law to more effectively protect the public’s health while avoiding legal trouble.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize legal issues. • Formulate legal questions. • Implement effective strategies for working with legal counsel. • Describe key principles of public health law. • Identify key public health laws that govern leadership’s responsibilities, authority, and limitations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 1.5 CNE Contact Hours

MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention: Policy, Science, and Opportunities (Capacity Building Webinar #5). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Kenneth Smith, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 81minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter explains the Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) change approach in chronic disease prevention and MCH. Specific examples are given related to the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change. • Explain the framework, rationale, and opportunities for using the PSE approach in chronic disease and MCH. • Participate in an interactive discussion session to explore how the PSE approach can be used in MCH, and specifically in a home visitation program.

Life Course Nutrition: Maternal and Child Health Strategies in Public Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Donna B. Johnson, PhD, RD, Elizabeth Adams, PhD, RD, Marion Taylor Baer, PhD, RD, Leslie Cunningham-Sabo, PhD, RD, Dena Herman, PhD, MPH, RD. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 75 minutes.

Annotation: This online module, based on a life course framework, is designed to help public health leaders describe the role of maternal and child nutrition in population health and identify actions they can take to create equitable access to healthy foods and food environments. There are three parts to the module: 1) Why Nutrition Matters, 2) The Life Course Framework, and 3) Applying the Life Course Framework. Each of these parts contains several expansive subtopics, a summary, and a “knowledge check” exercise. An additional, cumulative quiz is provided at the end of the module. A glossary and list of resources is also provided.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the role of maternal and child health (MCH) nutrition in the lifelong health of the population. • Access resources for assessment, assurance, and policy development for MCH nutrition. • Identify ways to integrate MCH nutrition within state and local public health agencies. • Apply the principles of the life course framework for population-based public health actions and initiatives.

Special Instructions: Registration to PH LearnLink is required. Click on the “Trainings” link and then the “Courses” link. Scroll down to “Life Course Nutrition: Maternal and Child Health Strategies in Public Health” and click on the title to begin.

Continuing Education: 1.2 hours

In Brief: The Foundations of Lifelong Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Center on the Developing Child (Harvard University). Presenter(s): Jack P. Shonkoff, MD; Tom Boyce; Bruce S. McEwen, PhD; Bernard Guyer, MD, MPH; David R. Williams. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 7 minutes.

Annotation: This video and pdf fact sheet of the "InBrief" series explains why a vital and productive society with a prosperous and sustainable future is built on a foundation of healthy child development. This video summarizes findings from The Foundations of Lifelong Health Are Built in Early Childhood, a report co-authored by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs.

Family Advocacy and Involvement in Title V Programs. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rylin Rodgers, BA. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes. Registration required

Annotation: This webcast reviews the role of family advocates in collaborating with Title V program staff. The presenter describes the benefits of partnering with family advocates — such as providing different perspectives — and the support advocates can bring to maternal and child health policy and programs. The appropriate roles for family advocates are presented, such as leading advocacy groups, acting as grant reviewers, becoming members of Boards of Trustees, and acting as group facilitators, among other roles. In addition, the skills and training advocates need to successfully collaborate with Title V programs are also discussed. Lastly, the presenter leads a discussion of examples of successful models of partnership such as collaborations within the Alabama Health Department.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the benefits of partnering with families, including advocacy for Title V programs, and supporting maternal and child health policy. • Discuss appropriate roles for family advocates and how Title V programs can operationalize their involvement. • Discuss what skills and training family advocates need to be successful in partnership with Title V programs. • Provide examples of successful models for partnership between family advocates and Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs.

Special Instructions: To access the video, scroll down on the landing page to the “View Program” gray box and choose a player to open the presentation. [Note: Need Real Player or Windows Media Player to watch].

Continuing Education: Nurses 1 hour, Social Workers 1 hour

Achieving Health Equity through Policy, Systems and Environmental Changes. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Robert Fullilove, EdD; Pamela Ferrari, RN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This program highlights a public health approach that includes policy, systems and environmental changes that can significantly impact the social determinants of health and subsequently lay the groundwork to achieve health equity. It explains health disparities, health equity, and social determinants of health, giving examples as seen in community health centers. The speakers describe what policy systems and environmental changes are required for impact to be measurable as measured by a Health Impact Pyramid. Handouts of the presentation (28 slides), CE credit information, and an evaluation and post-test are provided.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the social determinants of health, the effect they have on chronic disease/diabetes and how they contribute to health disparities/inequities. • Explain the differences between health disparity and health inequity. • Understand how health equity affects every individual. • Describe the impact of public policy on vulnerable rural and urban New York State communities • Understand the policy, systems and environmental changes that impact social determinants.

Special Instructions: This training downloads onto your computer and needs RealPlayer to operate.

Continuing Education: Nursing Contact Hours, CME, and CHES credits are available. Users need to fill out an evaluation and post-test.

Bloomberg Leadership Series: The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers. Year Developed: 2008. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Harvey Fineberg discusses his experiences with leadership and describes how his early career helped shape his evolution as a leader in public health, including roles as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and as the President of the Institute of Medicine. Throughout the lecture, he notes tips and strategies to influence and persuade policymakers. The second half of the presentation consists of a question and answer session with audience members, and addresses how to grab individuals’ attention and the importance of message framing. A discussion on the differences between storytelling, social movements and best practices concludes the talk.

Current Picture and Outlook for Children's Coverage. Year Developed: 2007. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Robin Rudowitz. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: In this webinar, the presenter provides an overview of children’s health insurance in America, focusing on low-income families. She discusses the changes in health insurance costs and rates of uninsured children. She continues by describing the major features, history, eligibility, enrollment, and differences between Medicaid and SCHIP. Ms. Rudowitz next focuses on children’s access to care and SCHIP’s reauthorization in 2007, as well as state’s expansion to of SCHIP to all children regardless of income eligibility. Additional resources are available for use.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Role of States in Health Policy. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Presenter(s): Alan Weil, MPP. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation begins with a discussion of the state as a regulator of health insurance and health care providers and reviews the states’ role as a purchaser of health care by focusing on Medicaid. Mr. Weil provides further detail on states’ various efforts to expand coverage. The lecture continues by discussing the state as a health care provider via its provision of services to specific populations in need, including the disabled, the mentally ill and the incarcerated, as well as through federal funding for programs like Title V and breast and cervical cancer screening.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Health Policy and the Federal Budget. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Tim Westmoreland. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced Introductory. Length: 20 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation concisely defines terms related to the federal budget, provides an overview of the budget process and discusses how this process affects health policy. After defining revenues, spending, deficit, and debt, Professor Westmoreland presents important concepts related to the budget: types of spending, baseline, limits and scorekeeping. He then explains how the budget process causes four health policy problems: 1) discretionary spending can’t keep up with health care costs; 2) long-term expenditures are discouraged by the five-year time frame for scorekeeping; 3) tax spending (deductions, credits, etc.) are not clear and unevaluated; 4) scorekeeping overprices and undervalues health benefits.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site. To access learning opportunity, download zip file and click "player.html."

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.