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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 57 found.

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

Local Health Policy 101: Understanding Ordinances, Resolutions, and Proclamations. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Jill Krueger, JD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: Attend this webinar, co-sponsored by the Network for Public Health Law and the National Association of Local Boards of Health (NALBOH), to learn about public health legal and policy innovations in small-town and medium-sized communities, as well as in the nation's largest cities, to address issues such as child poverty, tobacco control, environmental health and mental health. A video and slides are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the role of a local board of health, health department, city/ county government, and legal counsel with regard to reviewing and updating public health laws. • Explain the difference between advisory authority and policy-making authority, and how differing authority might make a resolution, proclamation, or ordinance an appropriate legal tool. • List resources for researching local public health laws and policies. • Identify examples of legal and policy innovations in the areas of child poverty, healthy eating, active living, tobacco control, environmental health, and mental health in rural, suburban, and urban communities.

Continuing Education: CLS credit may be available. Inquire to the network for details.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

CPH Study Session Webinars. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: ASPPH hosts a series of online study sessions in January to help Certified in Public Health (CPH) candidates prepare for the CPH exam. Each study session is led by expert faculty from ASPPH member schools and programs and focuses on one of the core areas of public health: behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, cross-cutting areas, environmental health, epidemiology, and health policy and management. Each session is two to three hours long and include lectures and interactive segments.

Title X Orientation: Program Requirements for Title X Funded Family Planning Projects. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Cardea Resource Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-Paced.

Annotation: In April 2014, the Office of Population Affairs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, released the Revised Title X Program Guidelines that included the Title X Program Requirements and the Providing Quality Family Planning Services Recommendations of CDC and OPA. This self-paced online course is designed as a brief overview of the Program Requirements for Title X funded family planning projects. It features links, resources, and interactive questions to help staff, new and experienced, better understand the requirements for projects that receive Title X funding.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss key elements of the program requirements for Title X funded family planning projects. • Define voluntary participation. • Define confidentiality. • Describe project services to be provided and the clients to be served.

Special Instructions: For additional information and training on the Title X Program Guidelines, visit the websites listed below. • Office of Population Affairs at http://www.hhs.gov/opa/title-x-family-planning • Title X Family Planning National Training Centers at http://www.fpntc.org

Policy in Perspective: The Changing Role of Public Health in a Post-ACA Era. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Mathematica Policy Research. Presenter(s): Christopher Trenholm, Judy Bigby. Type: Podcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 6 minutes, 17 seconds.

Annotation: A key role of public health agencies has been to help fill gaps in health care access by providing medical services to the uninsured and underinsured. But with more individuals gaining access to comprehensive coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA), programs focused on providing public medical services can now redirect resources to strengthen their other public health functions. In conjunction with National Public Health Week, this podcast, featuring Mathematica Senior Vice President and Director of Health Research Christopher Trenholm and Senior Fellow Judy Bigby, discusses the changing role of public health programs in an era of health care reform.

Disparities in the Health and Well-Being of Children and Youth in Rural Areas of the United States. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Janice Probst, PhD; Alana Knudson, PhD; Steve Holve, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: A presentation of recent data from national surveys and data sets on access, health status, and mortality patterns for children and youth in rural areas, along with resources and information on improving the health of these populations.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Contextualizing Guidance Workbook. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Alverex, MD, MPH; John Lavis, MD, MSC, PHD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 70 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: The Contextualizing Guidance Workbook can help professionals consider factors from the broader health system and political system so you make the most appropriate policy recommendations and decisions.

Collaboration and Communication in Healthcare: Principles of Interprofessional Practice. Year Developed: 2016. Source: University of California, San Francisco, Interprofessional Education Program. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: Series; varying lengths..

Annotation: Interprofessional collaborative practice is key to safe, high quality, accessible, patient-centered care. This course aims to introduce health professions learners to the fundamental principles and skills for effective interprofessional collaborative practice. This course is comprised of five modules consisting of 6-10 segments each. The five modules are available to be used consecutively or as stand-alone content. Module 1: What’s it all about? Introducing core interprofessional education concepts. (7 videos) Module 2: Who is on my team? Understanding the roles and abilities of different health professions. (6 videos) Module 3: How will our work get done? Understanding task distribution, accountability, and communication. (8 videos) Module 4: How do we tackle challenges? Conflict management and negotiation. (9 videos) Module 5: How can we work together? Leadership and membership in teams. (10 videos)

Learning Objectives: • Explore the benefits of interprofessional collaboration for patients and providers. • Discuss some of the forces that are moving healthcare towards greater interprofessional collaboration. • Describe the roles and scope of practice for different healthcare professionals Introduce key skills to enhance communication, collaboration and conflict management. • Explore team leadership and membership.

Vitally Important: Improving the Timeliness of Vital Statistics to Advance MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Patricia W. Potrzebowski, PhD; Glenn Copeland, MBA; John Paulson. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a.. Presentation Slides

Annotation: This presentation focuses on how states are working to improve vital statistics timeliness and data sharing, and how this is helping to inform and improve programs and health outcomes for women and infants. Topics include the importance and need for improving timeliness of vital records data; efforts underway to make vital statistics more current and thus more useful for public health program purposes; work being done to provide more timely data on infant mortality in Michigan in order to better inform programs working to improve outcomes, with a focus on the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (COIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality; and how Ohio compiles, augments, and uses the data in its public health data warehouse with a focus on using the State and Territorial Exchange of Vital Events (STEVE) System. Vital statistics—the data and health indicators collected from vital records on births and deaths—are an important source of data for answering national and state health questions. Birth and death records allow states to track maternal, fetal, and infant mortality, adverse birth outcomes, delivery characteristics, and maternal risk factors, among other statistics. Improving the timeliness of these records is essential to making sure they are most useful for monitoring and advancing public health efforts in real time.

Special Instructions: Webinar recorded using Adobe Connect. Post-Webinar Q&As (PDF – 129 KB): https://mchb.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/mchb/MaternalChildHealthInitiatives/dataspeak/april2015qas.pdf Transcript (PDF – 254 KB): https://mchb.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/mchb/MaternalChildHealthInitiatives/dataspeak/april2015transcript.pdf

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.