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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 13 found.

Using Critical Thinking to Advance MCH through Evidence. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): John Richards. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: n this series of learning modules developed in collaboration with the MCH Navigator, we will discuss how the MCH Leadership Competencies — specifically those related to critical thinking (population data, critical analysis, research, epidemiology, and application of evidence-based practice guidelines) — form a supporting structure to: (1) understand the evidence base; (2) develop a plan to move from an analysis of populations needs to evidence-based/informed action steps to address those needs; and (3) use trusted tools to advance health equity within the framework of social determinants of health.

Learning Objectives: • Consider the role of a leader in identifying an issue or problem, framing it as a specific question, considering it from multiple perspectives, evaluating relevant information, and developing a reasoned resolution • Explain the process by which critical thinking informs and aids in addressing a clinical, organizational, community-based, or research challenge • Discuss how evidence-based decision making and implementation science are critical thinking skills

Protecting Human Subjects and Institutional Review Boards: An Overview. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Justice Research and Statistics Association. Presenter(s): Ross Hickey, JD, CIP, CIPA; George Shaler, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces participants to the basics of institutional review board (IRBs), the need for them and when to submit research protocols for review to an IRB. The webinar, webinar slides, and participant biographies are available.

Learning Objectives: • How do I know if I am doing human subject research? • How does an IRB ensure the rights and welfare of human subjects involved in research are adequately protected? • Participants will learn to "issue spot" where the need for an IRB is likely to arise. • Participants will understand the background and purpose of the relevant human subject research regulations. • Participants will understand how to draft functional IRB protocols and procedures.

Mini-tutorials [on human subjects research]. Year Developed: 2017. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Research Protections. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This series of short tutorials (about 15 minutes each) focus on specific aspects of U. S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) human subjects regulations and policy. They include Institutional Review Board (IRB) review criteria, quorum and voting in IRB meetings; membership requirements for IRBs, prisoner research series, and OHRP reporting requirements.

Data for Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Teresa Litton. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webcast presents key findings from the Washington Health Alliance’s 2014 Disparities in Care Report that health care providers and their community partners can use to jointly address racial and ethnic disparities in health. Utilizing the report and its Medicaid claims analysis, health-related organizations can see how care is or is not provided and where opportunities for collaboration may exist.

Learning Objectives: • Increase knowledge of the Washington Health Alliance as a partner in health system transformation and population health efforts. • Increase understanding of health care data available through the Washington Health Alliance. • Identify five key findings from the Washington Health Alliance’s 2014 Disparities in Care report.

Special Instructions: Webinar participants will be encouraged to share ideas for using data to promote population health and health equity. Slides will be available the morning of the session on the Hot Topics website. This session will be recorded and the archive posted by the next day. We offer audio for this webinar through the phone or through your computer's speakers. Due to differences in internet quality at viewers' locations, we can't guarantee that the computer audio will be smooth and continuous. If the audio cuts out and is distracting, please call in on the phone line instead.

Big Data in Early Childhood; Using Integrated Data to Guide Impact. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Anthony, PhD; Jen Leone, MPH; Rebekah Dorman, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: This video conference profiles a large urban county experience in creating a unique integrated database comprised of public and private sector records on children zero‐six years of age. This community’s experience serves as a powerful example of how data can inform the decision making of funders, policymakers and providers. The presentation includes a description of how the integrated child well‐being database was created over 12 years, as well as how it is utilized on an ongoing basis to inform policy and practice. With records on more than 400,000 children born in the county, the data system links together information on births, child maltreatment, receipt of public assistance, as well as engagement in programming such as home visiting, child care, and mental health services. Collectively, the experience of over a decade shows the power of data in informing policy and program improvement. The presentation also addresses the challenges that have been faced and overcome regarding practical issues around data sharing agreements and securing data from many different public and private providers into an integrated dataset. It also addresses how to build a strong relationship between the government officials, academics, and the program providers so that trust and collaboration form the basis for improving the services available to children and their families.

Public Health Ethics Training Series. Year Developed: 2014. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The "Public Health Ethics" training series is designed to promote the ethical practice of public health by teaching about the ethical principles of public health and by providing resources for creating an ethical climate in public health agencies and schools of public health. This 8 Module series includes the following topics: • 1-Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • 2-Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • 3-The Public Health Code of Ethics • 4-Law and Ethics in Public Health • 5-Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • 6-Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • 7-Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • 8-Responding to Unethical Events

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • Describe the common practice settings from which medical ethics and public health ethics emerge. • Explain “the tyranny of the majority”. • Explain why the medical ethics principle of autonomy does not work as well in public health. Module 2--Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • Explain how a given value or belief from the list is important to public health. Module 3--The Public Health Code of Ethics • Describe how an aspirational code can guide an ethical discussion. • Describe a situation where a given ethical principle applies in public health. • Identify means of creating an ethical environment within public health organizations. Module 4--Law and Ethics in Public Health • Describe three of the several legal powers given to public health. • Describe an ethical principle in public health that is not encoded in public health law. • Describe how the exercise of any power is an ethical issue. Module 5--Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • Provide examples of how concepts of justice are applied to anticipated responses in an influenza pandemic. Module 6--Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • Describe how to recognize an ethical issue. • Describe the elements of a fair process. • Describe the steps of ethical decision-making in a group. Module 7--Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • Identify the facets of human nature and our social environment that are particularly relevant in leading to unethical behaviors in public health. Module 8--Responding to Unethical Events • Describe the range of possible responses to an event that is clearly unethical.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.92 Certificate of Attendance

MANTRA Research Data Managment Training. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University of Edinborough, Scotland. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths; each unit takes up to one hour, plus time for further reading and carrying out the data handling exercises.

Annotation: MANTRA is a free online course for those who manage digital data as part of their research project. Its modules include (1) Research Data Explained; (2) Data Management Plans; (3) Organizing Data; (4) File Formats and Transformation; (5) Documentation, Metadata, Citation; (6) Storage and Security; (7) Data Protection, Rights, and Access; (8) Sharing, Preservation, and Licensing; and (9) Data Handling Tutorials. The modules are slide decks with embedded videos, and each contains learning objectives.

Learning Objectives: See each module online for extensive learning objectives.

Continuing Education: Learners who require a certificate of completion may wish to enroll for their 5-week rolling Coursera MOOC instead: Research Data Management and Sharing, delivered in partnership with the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

How Ethics Serves Public Health. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Science Board. Presenter(s): Arthur Caplan. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: Using the problem of low rates of flu vaccinations as a case study, Arthur Caplan tells how bioethics can change behaviors. Caplan is the 2014 individual recipient of the National Science Board’s prestigious Public Service Award, recognizing his leadership and successful initiatives in the field of bioethics.

The Role and Use of Evidence in Policy. Year Developed: 2013 est.3.. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Feder, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course focuses on how public health professionals can better promote the use of their own work in policy discussions. Participants will explore how evidence is used in policy-making, and how sometimes policy decisions are made despite contrary evidence. The use of evidence may vary, depending upon the political process, so participants will consider several theoretical models of the policy process and what they imply about the use of evidence. This training also addresses how to improve evidence use and the role of knowledge brokers as well as how to frame messages for different audiences.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how evidence is used in policy making. • Identify how the use of evidence in policy making can be improved. • Discover ways in which you can better promote the use of your work in the policy discussions.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Orientation to the Essentials of Public Health (Advanced Level). Year Developed: 2006. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Carolyn C. Johnson, PhD, NCC, LPC; Thomas Farley, MD MPH; Joan Wightkin, Richard Culbertson. Type: Video Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 240 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This four-module course describes the basics and some advanced components of public health. Module 1 considers the philosophical and historic foundation of public health with additional focus on the concept, determinants and measurement of health. After defining public health and its unique features, this module also discusses the history of the development of the core functions and essential services of public health. Module 2 covers public health at the federal, state, and local levels, with particular emphasis on the application of essential services and connections between levels. Module 3 discusses the concept of assessment in more detail, describing common elements, methods, and data sources. Module 4 describes the ethical foundations of public health, with an introduction to schools of ethical thought, fundamental principles and future ethical challenges. Note: A multi-step registration process is required to access the module.

Learning Objectives: Module 1: Philosophical and Historical Perspectives of Public Health Module 1, Part 1 • Recognize the difficulty in defining health. • Explain the various definitions of health. • Develop your own definition of health based on your own work priorities. Module 1, Part 2 • Describe population-based measurements of health. • Recognize tools for health promotion and behavior change are available. • Discuss future goals for the nation. Module 1, Part 3 • Identify the domains of health determinants. • List and critically evaluate examples of health determinants in each domain. Module 1, Part 4 • Explain public health. • Argue the pros and cons of public health as a profession. • Describe components and images of public health. Module 1, Part 5 • Discuss the evolution of public health. • Describe the actions of historical heroes in public health. • Discuss public health’s achievements during the 20th century. Module 1, Part 6 • Identify the three core functions for public health work. • Translate the core functions into public health practice. • Apply the core functions of public health to your own work. Module 1, Part 7 • Discuss the unique features (core values) of public health. • Critically evaluate the interaction of these unique features. Module 1, Part 8 • Identify public health’s 10 essential services. • Discuss the practical implications of the essential services. • Compare your own work with the essential services that form the framework of public health. Module 2: The Structure of Public Health • Differentiate and compare local, state and federal public health roles and responsibilities. • Identify funding sources and how they are appropriated via the three levels. Module 3: Assessment as a Core Function Module 3, Part 1 • Explain how assessment fits in as a public health core function. • Describe ways to measure health status and disease rates in population. • Name the importance for monitoring trends in diseases. • Identify ways to find subpopulations at elevated risk. • Determine modifiable antecedents to disease. Module 3, Part 2 • List methods of assessment in assessing the health of a population. • Name forms of surveillance data collection. • Explain how to analyze, interpret and disseminate surveillance data. • Explain how vital statistics are used in assessment and the purpose of using special studies. • List questions and measures that are useful when evaluating public health programs. • Name both federal and state sources of data for overall health assessment. Module 4: The Culture of Public Health • Compare and contrast the ethical bases of public health and medical care. • Explain similarities and differences between law and ethics. • Define the philosophical and religious bases of ethics. • Explain the ethical foundations of public health and their impact on target constituencies.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, you should login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Orientation to Essentials of Public Health, Advanced Level.”

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.