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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 27 found.

Where To Find MCH Resources: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson and John Richards. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This short presentation discusses the information needs of MCH professionals and identifies distinct online resources to address those needs, from pop and professional sources such as Google, PubMed, and Wikipedia to grant-supported resources that address MCHB topical programs and initiatives. Topics include data warehouses, research centers, epidemiology sites, professional and membership organizations

Learning Objectives: • Identify information needs of professionals • Explain the differences between types of online resources • Differentiate between trusted and questionable online resources • Understand where to go to find additional resources

Secondary Use of Electronic Health Data for Child Health Research: Opportunities and Challenges. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): Robert Grundmeier, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 65 minutes.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the types of data readily available in electronic health records (EHRs) that support child health research activities. • Recognize the challenges with cleaning and organizing electronic health data before statistical analyses can be performed. • Gain a practical understanding of how researchers working with the American Academy of Pediatrics are using data from an EHR “supernetwork” to conduct cutting-edge research.

Secondary Data Sources and Data Linkages in Maternal and Child Health Research. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): Jihong Liu, ScD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 54 minutes.

Learning Objectives: • Become familiar with major national and local administrative and clinical databases in MCH research. • Identify relative advantages and disadvantages of using secondary data sources. • Understand how data linkage is a powerful research tool with potential limitations.

Disparities in the Health and Well-Being of Children and Youth in Rural Areas of the United States. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Janice Probst, PhD; Alana Knudson, PhD; Steve Holve, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: A presentation of recent data from national surveys and data sets on access, health status, and mortality patterns for children and youth in rural areas, along with resources and information on improving the health of these populations.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Vitally Important: Improving the Timeliness of Vital Statistics to Advance MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Patricia W. Potrzebowski, PhD; Glenn Copeland, MBA; John Paulson. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: This presentation focuses on how states are working to improve vital statistics timeliness and data sharing, and how this is helping to inform and improve programs and health outcomes for women and infants. Topics include the importance and need for improving timeliness of vital records data; efforts underway to make vital statistics more current and thus more useful for public health program purposes; work being done to provide more timely data on infant mortality in Michigan in order to better inform programs working to improve outcomes, with a focus on the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (COIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality; and how Ohio compiles, augments, and uses the data in its public health data warehouse with a focus on using the State and Territorial Exchange of Vital Events (STEVE) System. Vital statistics—the data and health indicators collected from vital records on births and deaths—are an important source of data for answering national and state health questions. Birth and death records allow states to track maternal, fetal, and infant mortality, adverse birth outcomes, delivery characteristics, and maternal risk factors, among other statistics. Improving the timeliness of these records is essential to making sure they are most useful for monitoring and advancing public health efforts in real time.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Statistical and Epidemiological Framework for Public Health Analyses. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Deb Rosenberg, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 77 slides. Audio

Annotation: This pre-course webinar for the 2015 Training Course in MCH Epidemiology provides an overview of MCH epidemiology including the basics of analytic methods, the sampling framework, and the epidemiologic framework.

Progress on the Redesign of the NSCH and the Data Resource Center. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Rheem Ghandour, DrPH, MPA; Christina Bethell, PhD, MBA, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) is funded and directed by MCHB with data collection coordinated by the U.S. Census Bureau. The survey examines the physical and emotional health of children from birth through 17 years of age with emphasis on factors that may be related to the well-being of children, including medical homes, family interactions, parental health, school experiences, and neighborhood safety. It has been redesigned, and will now also include new and revised content on a range of topics, including items of special relevance to Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and their families. The speakers will give an overview of the new NSCH as well as show how the Data Resource Center (DRC) resources can help optimize the use of the NSCH as well as other data on child and family health.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Orientation to the State Systems Development Initiative Minimum/Core Dataset Implementation Guide. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Mary Kay Kenney; Dina Dickerson. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This DataSpeak provided an orientation to the newly-developed and pilot-tested State Systems Development Initiative (SSDI) Minimum/Core Dataset Implementation Guide. The guide was created to support states in applying uniform standards to the development of the Minimum/Core indicators and included all Minimum/Core Dataset measures, data elements, data sources, procedures, and a recording mechanism. This orientation webinar included a high-level mapping of the Guide, Workbook, and Lookup Table contents, as well as a review of the instructional, data access, and recording processes.

Learning Objectives: • Define the purpose of the Guide. • Describe the major components of the Guide, the Workbook and Lookup Table. • Explain how to follow the instructions to get the required data in the Guide and record it in the Workbook. • The general overview presented in this webinar is a preview for a more in-depth presentation scheduled for the AMCHP Conference in January 2016.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Clusters, Maps, and Hotspots: Small Area Analysis in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE; Michael Kramer, PhD, MMSc; Thomas J. Stopka, PhD, MHS . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Maternal and child health professionals are increasingly interested in how health outcomes, risk factors, and health resources vary over space and time. Knowledge about how these factors differ across small segments of the population, such as across different counties or neighborhoods, can help health professionals design interventions for the populations who are most at need. Innovative and rigorous small area analyses are needed to help inform public health decisions that can improve maternal and child health. This DataSpeak presentation gives an overview of the applications of small area analysis for maternal and child health with real world examples based on these analyses.

Learning Objectives: • Review basic principles of mapping and its uses for studying spatial aspects of health phenomena. • Introduction to small area analysis.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Big Data in Early Childhood; Using Integrated Data to Guide Impact. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Anthony, PhD; Jen Leone, MPH; Rebekah Dorman, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: This video conference profiles a large urban county experience in creating a unique integrated database comprised of public and private sector records on children zero‐six years of age. This community’s experience serves as a powerful example of how data can inform the decision making of funders, policymakers and providers. The presentation includes a description of how the integrated child well‐being database was created over 12 years, as well as how it is utilized on an ongoing basis to inform policy and practice. With records on more than 400,000 children born in the county, the data system links together information on births, child maltreatment, receipt of public assistance, as well as engagement in programming such as home visiting, child care, and mental health services. Collectively, the experience of over a decade shows the power of data in informing policy and program improvement. The presentation also addresses the challenges that have been faced and overcome regarding practical issues around data sharing agreements and securing data from many different public and private providers into an integrated dataset. It also addresses how to build a strong relationship between the government officials, academics, and the program providers so that trust and collaboration form the basis for improving the services available to children and their families.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.