Access trainings by the type of learning that matches your need:

Self Directed: Know what you want to learn?

Looking for some assistance to help you find what you're looking for?
MCHfast Guided Search

Still looking or need assistance? You can always ask for Help.

Semi-Structured: Looking for trainings grouped according to your need?

Self-Reflective. Not sure of your learning needs? Take the online Self-Assessment.

Fast & Focused. Want to learn on the go? Sign up for one of our Micro-learning programs.

Intense & Immersive. Looking for a comprehensive course that covers everything? Access the MCHsmart curriculum - Coming Soon.

Focus Areas. Need specialized resources?

Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 51 found.

MCHB Technical Assistance Provider Webinar: COVID-19 Impacts and Next Steps. Year Developed: 2021. Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Michael Warren, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 187 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation, conducted by MCHB, provides a COVID-19 impact overview and recap. Next, breakout discussions are held around 2 topic areas: 1) vaccinating MCH populations and 2) strengthening mental health supports for families.

Learning Objectives: Highlight the role of the TA Providers in: •Supporting the goals of MCHB in building a nation where all mothers, children and families are thriving. •Supporting grantees and/or the MCH field and the system of services for MCH populations, particularly around the impacts of COVID-19. •Amplifying expertise into respective topical areas/audiences. •Describing strategies and successes for the purpose of replicating within the scope of their work.

Social Determinants of Health: Challenges and Opportunities in Rural America. Year Developed: 2020. Source: Rural Health Research Gateway. Presenter(s): Jan Probst, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes. direct you tube link

Annotation: Social determinants of health are defined by the World Health Organization as "the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age". For rural populations, many of these elements are less favorable than within urban areas. Building on work conducted by the Rural and Minority Health Research Center, this presentation reviews some of the key elements associated with health across rural White and minority populations, such as education, income, and health facility availability.

Learning Objectives: • Learn to define key terms around SDOH and rural ameria • Describe rural disparities • Understand how to plan a way forward

Child Health Care Transformation and Early Childhood Policy: Opportunities for Impact and Equity. Year Developed: 2020. Source: InCK Marks. Presenter(s): Martha Davis, Elisabeth Burak, Mayra Alvarez, Melissa Bailey, Karen Howard, Joan Lombardi. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 77 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar includes a discussion around child health care transformation opportunities in Medicaid and CHIP. Opportunities for federal leadership in transforming child health is also addressed.

New Grantee Orientation: Division of MCH Workforce Development. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Lauren Raskin Ramos, MPH; Laura Kavanagh, MPP; Meredith Morrisette, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; length varies.

Annotation: This webinar presented information to new grantees of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau's (MCHB's) Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWD). Topics included: • Overview of the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). • Overview of the Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWD). • Description of the current DMCHWD investments. • Review of reporting requirements and key deadlines for DMCHWD grantees. • Key cross-cutting resources and communications mechanisms. • An opportunity for targeted Q&A with DMCHWD staff. Previous years' orientations are also available: 2015 https://altarum.adobeconnect.com/_a758956138/dmchwd072315 2014 https://altarum.adobeconnect.com/_a758956138/dmchwd073114

Learning Objectives: • Provide an overview of the organization of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the DMCHWD. • Discuss the Division's programs, goals, and impact. • Review information related to grants administration. • Introduce key resources.

Health Care Transition & Title V Care Coordination Initiatives. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Got Transition. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This is a five-part Webinar Series featuring examples of best practices among state Title V agencies, tools and resources, and problem-solving strategies. Titles include: (1) Starting A Transition Improvement Process Using the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition; (2) Transition Preparation; (3) Transfer to Adult Care; (4) Integration into Adult Care; and (5) Youth, Young Adult & Parent Engagement. Recordings and handouts are available.

Learning Objectives: Session 1: • Overview of health care transition baseline results from Title V care coordination (CC) programs. • Forming a HCT quality improvement team with CC team and youth/young adults/parents. • Defining HCT pilot population, timeline, measures of success. • Selecting HCT core elements and delineating roles of CC program and YSHCN providers. Session 2: • Identifying key components of HCT policy for CC programs that families/youth want to know. • Customizing transition readiness assessment (RA) for CC programs • Piloting and disseminating HCT policy and RA. • Incorporating RA skill needs into plan of care and educating youth and families on needed skills. • Preparing medical summary and emergency care plan with youth and families and their providers. Session 3: • Identifying willing adult primary and specialty providers. • Sequencing plans for transferring young adults with multiple providers. • Identifying ways to support adult practices (consultation, care coordination). • Preparing transfer package and communicating with pediatric and adult practices. Session 4: • Ensuring welcome and orientation FAQs from the adult practice to transferring young adults and pediatric practice. • Facilitating initial appointment to adult doctor, including confirmation of receipt of transfer package. • Supporting adult practice with CC assistance from Title V and linking to adult disability resources. Session 5: • Identifying youth/young adults/parents to participate in HCT initiatives in Title V CC programs. • Providing transition education and training and mentoring opportunities. • Eliciting consumer feedback with HCT care coordination process. • Building youth/young adult/parent leadership roles on HCT within state Title V programs.

Diversity and Health Equity Training Brief. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on online trainings and resources for use by the Title V workforce in approaching diversity as a way to address health disparities, health equity, and removing barriers to care.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

Using Geographic Information Science to Advance Heath Equity and Environmental Justice. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Andrew Maroko, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Environmental factors have an important impact on the health of communities. Public health professionals may use geographic information sciences (GIS) to assess the health of communities by analyzing exposure, or being subjected to negative factors such as pollution, as well as accessibility, or the ability to access positive factors such as green space and healthy food. In this webinar, Dr. Andrew Maroko discusses the process of geovisualization, hypothesis generation, data exploration, and communication and knowledge transfer in conducting environmental justice research. Dr. Maroko also describes various methods and technologies used to estimate exposure and accessibility, and provides examples of GIS in environmental justice/health equity projects in New York City and Glasgow, Scotland.

Learning Objectives: • To describe how geographic information science can be used to advance health equity and environmental justice. • To describe the environmental factors that lead to health disparities. • To list examples of how geographic information science has been used in health equity research.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Continuing Education: CHES, CPHCE

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Managing Social Determinants of Health: A Framework for Identifying, Addressing Disparities in Medicaid Populations / A Conceptual and Analytical Framework for Identifying and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Medicaid Populations. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Health Management Associates and Disability Policy Consortium. Presenter(s): Ellen Breslin; Anissa Lambertino; Dennis Heaphy; Tony Dreyfus. Type: n.a.. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Social determinants of health are increasingly recognized by Medicaid programs as important drivers of poor health outcomes and disparities that lead to higher costs. In response, Medicaid programs are beginning to analyze social determinants of health as potential causes of health disparities. During this webinar, Ellen Breslin and Anissa Lambertino of HMA, Dennis Heaphy of the Disability Policy Consortium, and independent consultant Tony Dreyfus presented an analytical framework for understanding the impact social determinants of health have on Medicaid populations. Leveraging work done by the Institute of Medicine, the framework includes measures and statistical methods that Medicaid programs, health plans, and accountable care organizations can use to generate the type of information needed to develop interventions that improve health outcomes.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why social determinants of health are key to addressing health disparities and achieving the goals of payment and delivery system reform. • Learn about the value of population-based approaches for examining the relationship between social determinants of health and health disparities. • Find out what it takes to implement the type of framework, measures and statistical methods needed to effectively examine the importance of social determinants of health on health outcomes.

Next »

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.