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New Grantee Orientation: Division of MCH Workforce Development. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Lauren Raskin Ramos, MPH; Laura Kavanagh, MPP; Meredith Morrisette, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; length varies.

Annotation: This webinar presented information to new grantees of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau's (MCHB's) Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWD). Topics included: • Overview of the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). • Overview of the Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWD). • Description of the current DMCHWD investments. • Review of reporting requirements and key deadlines for DMCHWD grantees. • Key cross-cutting resources and communications mechanisms. • An opportunity for targeted Q&A with DMCHWD staff. Previous years' orientations are also available: 2015 https://altarum.adobeconnect.com/_a758956138/dmchwd072315 2014 https://altarum.adobeconnect.com/_a758956138/dmchwd073114

Learning Objectives: • Provide an overview of the organization of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the DMCHWD. • Discuss the Division's programs, goals, and impact. • Review information related to grants administration. • Introduce key resources.

Diversity and Health Equity Training Brief. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on online trainings and resources for use by the Title V workforce in approaching diversity as a way to address health disparities, health equity, and removing barriers to care.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

Using Geographic Information Science to Advance Heath Equity and Environmental Justice. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Andrew Maroko, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Environmental factors have an important impact on the health of communities. Public health professionals may use geographic information sciences (GIS) to assess the health of communities by analyzing exposure, or being subjected to negative factors such as pollution, as well as accessibility, or the ability to access positive factors such as green space and healthy food. In this webinar, Dr. Andrew Maroko discusses the process of geovisualization, hypothesis generation, data exploration, and communication and knowledge transfer in conducting environmental justice research. Dr. Maroko also describes various methods and technologies used to estimate exposure and accessibility, and provides examples of GIS in environmental justice/health equity projects in New York City and Glasgow, Scotland.

Learning Objectives: • To describe how geographic information science can be used to advance health equity and environmental justice. • To describe the environmental factors that lead to health disparities. • To list examples of how geographic information science has been used in health equity research.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Continuing Education: CHES, CPHCE

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Managing Social Determinants of Health: A Framework for Identifying, Addressing Disparities in Medicaid Populations / A Conceptual and Analytical Framework for Identifying and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Medicaid Populations. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Health Management Associates and Disability Policy Consortium. Presenter(s): Ellen Breslin; Anissa Lambertino; Dennis Heaphy; Tony Dreyfus. Type: n.a.. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Social determinants of health are increasingly recognized by Medicaid programs as important drivers of poor health outcomes and disparities that lead to higher costs. In response, Medicaid programs are beginning to analyze social determinants of health as potential causes of health disparities. During this webinar, Ellen Breslin and Anissa Lambertino of HMA, Dennis Heaphy of the Disability Policy Consortium, and independent consultant Tony Dreyfus presented an analytical framework for understanding the impact social determinants of health have on Medicaid populations. Leveraging work done by the Institute of Medicine, the framework includes measures and statistical methods that Medicaid programs, health plans, and accountable care organizations can use to generate the type of information needed to develop interventions that improve health outcomes.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why social determinants of health are key to addressing health disparities and achieving the goals of payment and delivery system reform. • Learn about the value of population-based approaches for examining the relationship between social determinants of health and health disparities. • Find out what it takes to implement the type of framework, measures and statistical methods needed to effectively examine the importance of social determinants of health on health outcomes.

A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. Presenter(s): Barbara Brandt, Patricia A. Cuff, Sandra D. Lane, Julian Fisher, Bianca Frogner. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar discusses how each speaker has used and implemented specific aspects of the Framework including: • a description of Interprofessional courses built upon the social determinants of health concept, that utilizes innovative teaching methods and actively engages members of the community for educating students; • an illustration of how a medical education department is finding ways to integrate the framework into the curriculum for health professional training in rural and underserved areas of the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho region; • a description of WHO’s efforts to integrate SDH into health workforce education and training to prepare for integrated people-centered health services, how SDH / IPE are addressed, and how this links to the framework & conceptual model. The Framework was published by the Institute of Medicine in 2016.

From Early Adversity to Permanency: Implications for Occupational and Life Course Health Development. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Amy Lynch, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the impact of early adversity and trauma upon the occupational development and success of children developing in an atypical environment - namely those who have experienced foster care and/or international adoption - including the "ripple effect" across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives:

Developing Evidence About Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN, reviews the importance of collecting standardized data and demonstrates how the information is being used to make the case for public health services. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; Program staff and managers working in environmental health and communicable disease prevention. A recording, slides, and a slides handout are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local health department administrative data can be used to demonstrate the value of public health services. • Describe the need for and value of standardized public health services data for public health performance, advocacy, and building evidence. • Describe opportunities for filling critical gaps in local public health services data.

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.