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How to Make Sense of Your Agency’s Data: Move from Data Collection to Analytics . Year Developed: 2018. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Jack London. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: With a growing population, an increase in connected devices and the rapid pace of technological development, agencies are now collecting more data than ever before. Not to mention, the sprawl of government information systems and technologies means that agencies are also generating significant amounts of information. All that data can be extremely valuable to the way government achieves mission goals. But to reap that value, agencies must be able to do more than collect it; they must be able to analyze it. In this course, we examine the barriers that many agencies face in bridging the gap between collection and analytics. We also identify the three critical tasks that agencies must achieve to glean insights from their data. Finally, we examine how data analytics can have real impact on the operations of government agencies. The course comprises an overview, 3 lessons, a knowledge check, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Overcoming the Challenges of Data Analytics in Government: Embrace Data Analytics. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Jack London. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: This course is for anyone who wants to innovate the way their agencies gather and analyze data. It focuses on technology as well as organizational innovation to help your agency harness big data. The course lays out a roadmap to navigating data analytics and management and outlines the various opportunities of data analytics as well as the challenges of getting started. It also highlights how to select technology solutions and build your analytics expertise. The course comprises an overview, 6 lessons, a knowledge check, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Data Analytics Fundamentals: Learn to Use Your Data. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: Data is powerful. We can use it to shape policies; craft citizen services; and even secure government. But it takes more than data alone to drive better decision-making and ultimately better outcomes. We also need the right tools to combine that data and search for patterns, anomalies and trends that otherwise would go undetected. The course explores how to turn your data into insights, explains what data analytics is, how it’s different from big data, and – most importantly – how it can impact government operations and citizen services. Then, it discusses how to get the most out of your data by walking through some common challenges to data success and then matching those challenges to cultural and technical solutions. To help us with some of the technical lingo, we also hear from expert, Melissa Fields, Solutions Architect at ClearShark – an industry leader in providing customized, integrated and managed IT solutions to government. The course comprises an overview, 6 lessons,2 interactive segments, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Public Speaking: Ten Tips from GovLoop's Founder. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Steve Ressler. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: Public speaking is an art and it does take practice. While you can’t wake up and assume you’re going to be an excellent public speaker, you can hone the skills to get closer to mastery. After all, being an effective presenter is a critical competency for everyone in an organization, not just leaders! The course comprises an overview, 6 lessons,2 interactive segments, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Train yourself to speak slowly and keep your remarks succinct. • Incorporate interaction and stories into your speaking opportunities. • Pay attention to the design of your slides and know your content cold.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Developing Evidence About Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN, reviews the importance of collecting standardized data and demonstrates how the information is being used to make the case for public health services. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; Program staff and managers working in environmental health and communicable disease prevention. A recording, slides, and a slides handout are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local health department administrative data can be used to demonstrate the value of public health services. • Describe the need for and value of standardized public health services data for public health performance, advocacy, and building evidence. • Describe opportunities for filling critical gaps in local public health services data.

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink.

Clusters, Maps, and Hotspots: Small Area Analysis in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE; Michael Kramer, PhD, MMSc; Thomas J. Stopka, PhD, MHS . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Maternal and child health professionals are increasingly interested in how health outcomes, risk factors, and health resources vary over space and time. Knowledge about how these factors differ across small segments of the population, such as across different counties or neighborhoods, can help health professionals design interventions for the populations who are most at need. Innovative and rigorous small area analyses are needed to help inform public health decisions that can improve maternal and child health. This DataSpeak presentation gives an overview of the applications of small area analysis for maternal and child health with real world examples based on these analyses.

Learning Objectives: • Review basic principles of mapping and its uses for studying spatial aspects of health phenomena. • Introduction to small area analysis.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Big Data in Early Childhood; Using Integrated Data to Guide Impact. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Anthony, PhD; Jen Leone, MPH; Rebekah Dorman, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: This video conference profiles a large urban county experience in creating a unique integrated database comprised of public and private sector records on children zero‐six years of age. This community’s experience serves as a powerful example of how data can inform the decision making of funders, policymakers and providers. The presentation includes a description of how the integrated child well‐being database was created over 12 years, as well as how it is utilized on an ongoing basis to inform policy and practice. With records on more than 400,000 children born in the county, the data system links together information on births, child maltreatment, receipt of public assistance, as well as engagement in programming such as home visiting, child care, and mental health services. Collectively, the experience of over a decade shows the power of data in informing policy and program improvement. The presentation also addresses the challenges that have been faced and overcome regarding practical issues around data sharing agreements and securing data from many different public and private providers into an integrated dataset. It also addresses how to build a strong relationship between the government officials, academics, and the program providers so that trust and collaboration form the basis for improving the services available to children and their families.

MANTRA Research Data Managment Training. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University of Edinborough, Scotland. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths; each unit takes up to one hour, plus time for further reading and carrying out the data handling exercises.

Annotation: MANTRA is a free online course for those who manage digital data as part of their research project. Its modules include (1) Research Data Explained; (2) Data Management Plans; (3) Organizing Data; (4) File Formats and Transformation; (5) Documentation, Metadata, Citation; (6) Storage and Security; (7) Data Protection, Rights, and Access; (8) Sharing, Preservation, and Licensing; and (9) Data Handling Tutorials. The modules are slide decks with embedded videos, and each contains learning objectives.

Learning Objectives: See each module online for extensive learning objectives.

Continuing Education: Learners who require a certificate of completion may wish to enroll for their 5-week rolling Coursera MOOC instead: Research Data Management and Sharing, delivered in partnership with the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Life of a Benchmark or Benchmarks for Real Life. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Kathleen Anger, PhD. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: State and tribal Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) programs are required to measure program processes and participant outcomes for 35 constructs categorized into six benchmark topic areas. Programs must show improvement in at least 50% of the construct measures within at least four of the benchmark areas. This webinar examines lessons learned from Oregon’s MIECHV experience and principles that can be used for selection and use of performance measures. By stepping through the entire process from measure selection and definition, through data collection and analysis, and interpretation and use of measures in continuous quality improvement (CQI), the webinar illustrates the interconnection of the steps in the process, intended and unintended consequences of each step, and the balance between data goals and program goals.

Learning Objectives: • Describe at least 3 examples of how decisions made at one stage of designing and using performance measures can affect quality and efficiency at other stages. • State at least 3 actions to take or to avoid when designing performance measures, data collection processes, and continuous quality improvement programs (CQI).

Conducting Research with Online Data Query Tools. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Anthony Damico. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 20 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation focuses on analyzing public health data sources in order to answer questions about health care and policy without the use of statistical software. Online query tools, such as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), and Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), can be used to view specific information, adjust for confounders, and create tables from large datasets. Mr. Damico walks the learner though analysis examples from each of these three websites, and also includes a list of global and U.S. specific health datasets for use.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.