Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 21 through 30 of 41 found.

Public Health Learning Modules. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-Paced.

Annotation: Public Health Learning Modules are a teaching tool to advance knowledge of policy initiatives, existing and emerging research, and transformative models. They contain video lectures, slide presentations, student assessments, in-class activities and resources. The following 15 modules follow the framework of Healthy People 2020, the science-based 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans: Module 1--Advancing Healthy People 2020: Learning and Practice Module 2--The Legal Infrastructure of Public Health Module 3--Social Determinants of Health: a Lens for Public Health Module 4--Emergencies: Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery Module 5--Tobacco Use: Prevention, Cessation and Policy Module 6--Substance Use: Addressing Addiction and Emerging Issues Module 7--Mental Health: A Systems Approach Module 8--Access to Health Services: Multiple Perspectives Module 9--Healthcare Associated Infections Across the Spectrum of Care Module 10--Health Information Technology: Using Data to Inform Practice Module 11--Food: Obesity, Access and Ongoing Issues Module 12--Injury Prevention: Targeting Teen Driving Module 13--Using Policy and Best Practices in Maternal, Infant and Child Health: Maternity Care Coalition Module 14--Using Best Practices to Provide Health Services to the LGBT Population: The Mazzoni Center Module 15--Oral Health Across the Lifespan Module 16--Public Health Infrastructure in the United States: An Integrated System Module 17--Environmental Health: Issues and Impact Last Module--Bringing it All Together: Healthy People 2020 in the Classroom and Beyond

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Advancing Health People 2020: Learning and Practice • Introduce the Healthy People 2020 Learning Modules project. • Define the overarching goals of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. • Describe the available data to track progress related to Healthy People objectives. • Explain the modules format and how Healthy People can more effectively be integrated into public health education. Module 2--The Legal Infrastructure of Public Health • Understand the importance of law in the Public Health infrastructure. • Integrate law and Public Health systems research and practice. • Recognize infrastructural Public Health law at work. Module 3--Social Determinants of Health: a Lens for Public Health • Understand the overarching framework of the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and how they are woven throughout all of the topic areas of Healthy People 2020. • Identify the five domains of SDOH within Healthy People 2020. • Explore the impact of SDOH on population health through practical application. Module 4--Emergencies: Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery • Describe the history of emergencies and their influence on prevention activities. • Evaluate methods for preparing for emergencies at the individual, community, and governmental levels. • Describe the process for emergency response for different scales/types of emergencies citing specific examples. • Assess the emergency recovery process and the challenges therein for different types of emergencies. Module 5--Tobacco Use: Prevention, Cessation and Policy • Improve knowledge of policy and program applications to influence tobacco screening and cessation assessment, advice, and counseling in health care settings involving traditional and emerging tobacco products. • Increase knowledge and policy applications to improve indoor (and outdoor) smoke-free laws in a variety of settings. • Expand knowledge and applications for the development of increasing federal, state, and local taxes on tobacco products to reduce tobacco consumption. Module 6--Substance Use: Addressing Addiction and Emerging Issues • Increase knowledge of prevalence, challenges and opportunities for addressing current substance abuse problems through policy and preventive programs. • Improve knowledge of the prevalence, issues, challenges and opportunities for reducing the prevalence of underage drinking and driving in the US through current policies and preventive programs. •Improve knowledge of the prevalence, challenges and opportunities for reducing prescription drug abuse through current policies and preventive programs. Module 7--Mental Health: A Systems Approach Coming Soon... Module 8--Access to Health Services: Multiple Perspectives • Understand how access to care is defined. • Describe barriers to access. • Identify and describe the components of the safety net. Module 9--Healthcare Associated Infections Across the Spectrum of Care • Understand the burden and nature of healthcare-associated infections across the spectrum of care. • Discuss prevention strategies that are effective across the spectrum of care. • Review the epidemiology associated with the most common hospital-associated infections. • Examine the causes of healthcare-associated infections in long-term care facilities. • Identify the risk for healthcare-associated infections in ambulatory care settings. Module 10--Health Information Technology: Using Data to Inform Practice • Introduce the topic of Health Information Technology. • Review the primary uses of Health Information Technology in practice. • Describe the use of Health Information Technology as it impacts population health. Module 11--Food: Obesity, Access and Ongoing Issues • Understand connections between the built environment and health. • Review current recommendations, practices and progress in the field working to provide access to affordable nutritious food. • Examine current research on food access strategies and health promotion. • Describe the process of engaging stakeholders and stimulate policy change. Module 12--Injury Prevention: Targeting Teen Driving • Introduce the topic of injury prevention, focusing on teen driving crashes. • Discuss data sources to evaluate the magnitude of the issue and success of interventions. • Explain existing policy interventions. • Describe the specific example of New Jersey’s teen driver policy. Module 13--Using Policy and Best Practices in Maternal, Infant and Child Health: Maternity Care Coalition • Describe the utility of a multi-faceted approach to address maternal, infant and child health issues. • Identify policy approaches to public health issues being addressed by • Community Based Organizations. • Describe the components of a multi-tiered breastfeeding promotion initiative. Module 14--Using Best Practices to Provide Health Services to the LGBT Popualtion: The Mazzoni Center • Describe cultural competence as it relates to LGBT health services. • Identify key policy issues in the LGBT population. • Describe the components of culturally competent LGBT services. Module 15--Bringing it All Together: Healthy People 2020 in the Classroom and Beyond • Describe the various ways public health officials use Healthy People 2020 in the municipal public health system. • Identify at least two opportunities to demonstrate knowledge and use of Healthy People 2020 in ongoing and future work.

Continuing Education: Each module has continuing education credits; the courses expire 12/1/2017

MCH 3.0 Virtual Town Hall. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Maternal and Child Health Training Program, Division of MCH Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Michael C. Lu, MD, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: In this informational video, Dr. Lu explains how the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau has been working in partnership with the leadership in State Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programs, national MCH leaders, and other stakeholders to develop and refine a new vision (titled MCH 3.0) for transforming the MCH Block Grant to better meet current and future challenges facing the Nation’s mothers and children, including children with special health care needs. Dr. Lu explains how MCHB has used a three-proged approach to begin this process and discusses the evolution of MCH 3.0.

Learning Objectives: • Provide and overview of MCH 3.0. • Outline new directions for the MCH Block Grant Program including Discretionary Grant Programs.

This is Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2013. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Molly Schlife Isacco, MPH; Chad Abresch, MEd; Hani Atrash, MD, MPH; Holly Grason, MA; Laura Kavanagh, MPP; William Sappenfield, MD, MPH; Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, MD, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This self-paced presentation introduced concepts, terms, frameworks, programs and activities that comprise “Maternal and Child Health (MCH).” Two basic questions are addressed: 1) What does “MCH” mean? And 2) What roles do MCH professionals play to assure a healthy American public? Commentary from a panel of seasoned MCH advisors combine to explore key aspects of MCH including the population health perspective, programmatic components, emphasis on lifespan approach and health disparities, and history and legacy of the field.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the meaning of MCH. • Understand the role of MCH professionals in the field of public health.

The ABCs of ACOs for MCH. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Christopher A. Kus, MD, MPH; Colleen A. Kraft, MD, FAAP; Cate Wilcox, MPH; Don Ross; Marilyn Hartzell, MEd. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Covered in this webinar are the roles of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in population health and how they integrate with community-based systems of care, including public health agencies, on a range of issues, such as care coordination and other MCH community services. The webinar presentations by an ACO provider, Medicaid staff, and Title V MCH and CYSHCN Directors highlight key considerations for maternal and child health populations, the role of public health in ACO implementation, and efforts to implement ACOs that have a focus on pediatric populations (particularly CSHCN).

Learning Objectives: • Increase knowledge of ACOs and ACOs that include MCH populations. • Increase understanding of how public health can play a role in ACOs. • Identify strategies and resources to collaborate with ACOs.

Measuring a Life Course Approach to MCH: The AMCHP Life Course Metrics Project and Final Set of Indicators. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Caroline Stampfel, MPH (moderator); William Sappenfield, MD, MPH; Ghasi Phillips, ScD, MS; Brenda Fink, Brenda Fink, ACSW. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: n.a.. Final set of life course indicators and supporting resources.

Annotation: This webinar provides an overview of the Life Course Metrics Project and its process, sharing decision points and methods for engaging the MCH community. The webinar explains how the final set of life course indicators were developed through a collaborative process with seven state teams (Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, and North Carolina) to identify and promote measurable progress using the life course approach to improve MCH. Representatives from state MCH programs, including MCH epidemiology, share their perspectives on participating in the project, the challenges and lessons they learned, and how the life course indicators will influence their work and future efforts. The webinar concludes with a discussion with National Expert Panel members on the implications of the life course indicators for the field of MCH.

Changing Paradigms in Maternal and Child Health: Innovative Lessons from the Life Course. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Alabama Department of Public Health and the Alabama Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Cheri Pies, MSW, DrPH; Bina Shrimali, MPH. Type: Video Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 82 minutes.

Annotation: Beginning with a brief presentation of the life course perspective and its associated key terms and concepts. Dr. Cheri Pies explains topics such as early programming, the cumulative impact of stress in the environment, and the role of life course initiatives in reducing risk and increasing protective factors to change health trajectories over a lifetime. Bina Shrimali then describes, using practical examples, how the health department in Alameda County, California uses life course concepts to address persistent health disparities and enable families to live healthy, productive lives. She presents the Building Blocks for Health Equity Program and the priority-setting process they underwent, and together with Dr. Pies, shares lessons learned that can be applied to life course projects in diverse settings. The module ends with a question and answer period, where the presenters provide further guidance on topics such as accessing data, managing and sustaining projects, engaging partners, families, and students, and inspiring innovation. Viewers learn how to operationalize life course concepts to create practical, day-to-day programs and incorporate the perspective into practice.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss the history and process of the application of the Life Course approach to the Maternal and Child Health field. • lllustrate how factors over a lifetime can impact health, particularly in relation to birth outcomes. • Describe activities in Alameda County, California related to the Life Course Initiative. • Identify potential collaborative relationships or partnerships to address health inequities in MCH.

Special Instructions: To access the video, scroll down on the landing page to the “View Program” gray box and choose a player to open the presentation. [Note: Need Real Player or Windows Media Player to watch].

Continuing Education: Continuing Nursing Education credits are available. Individuals must watch the program in its entirety, complete the evaluation, and upload forms to the appropriate organization within two years of the date of the presentation.

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

Maternal and Child Health Community Centers: Background. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Holly Grason, MA. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 45 minutes. Audio version

Annotation: In this lecture session, Holly Grason explains the historical and political context of Community Health Centers (CHCs). She reviews their original function, starting in the 1960s and summarizes their role in the health care system today. Throughout the lecture she provides in-depth information on the legislative and funding structures of the Community Health Center program. The speaker goes on to discuss the utilization of CHCs by subpopulation and the effects of the CHC program as demonstrated through evaluation data, such as improved access and reduced hospitalization. She concludes by emphasizing the potential role of the CHC program in the future health care system. A PDF of the presentation slides is available at http://courseplus.jhu.edu/breezeContent/oncampus/MCHL/LectureBB/secA/MCH-secBBa-Grason_6.pdf.

Learning Objectives: • Provide definition and historical backdrop of the federal Community Health Center (CHC) program. • Describe the several types of CHC programs. • Review the structural characteristics of CHCs. • Briefly note CHC populations and outcomes.

Special Instructions: This link downloads an Adobe Presenter file that you can play locally on your computer.

Life Course Perspectives on Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health. Presenter(s): Robert Blum, MD, MPH, PhD; M.E. Hughes, PhD, MA. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online course on the life course framework is divided into two parts: 1.) An introduction to the life course perspective, human development theory, and other causation and conceptual frameworks that aim to explain health outcomes (including using obesity as an example); and, 2.) The health and development over the life course (prenatal period through senescence). Using best practices, the course provides a conceptual framework with which to understand the interrelationships among biological, psychological, and social factors and their influence on development and health. Application of theories relating to population health occurs throughout segments. To further learning, suggested readings and voluntary assignments accompany lectures.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the components of a life course perspective on health, the advantages of using this approach in public health, and the challenges involved in doing so. • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the life course and human development and its relationship to individual health. In particular, students should be able to identify the meaning and measurement of "health" at particular life stages and articulate interrelationships among the biological, psychological, behavioral and social processes that shape health across the life course. • Develop a conceptual framework illustrating a life course approach to a specific outcome of concern to public health.

Special Instructions: To access course, use links (Syllabus, Schedule, Lecture Materials, Readings, and Assignments) in the “Course Home” menu on the left of the landing page.

Leadership and Advocacy: Trends and Challenges in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Michael Fraser, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: In 1935, Title V of the Social Security Act established a federal-state partnership to address the needs of the maternal and child health population. Over the years, though changes have occurred, Title V remains the oldest federal program dedicated to the health of all mothers and children. Strong leadership and advocacy skills are critical to the program’s success. Program faculty discussed national trends in maternal and child health, national leadership for MCH, current challenges and opportunities, and future directions. *NOTE: This course was originally delivered as a satellite broadcast.

Learning Objectives: • Describe maternal and child health leadership and current challenges and opportunities. • Discuss leadership and the importance of advocacy. • Present applications of maternal and child leadership in current practice settings. • Provide ideas and suggestions for future directions of Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs in light of the Affordable Care Act.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance; CEUs: Nursing 1.5 hours, Social Work 1.5 hours

« Previous Next »

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.