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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 41 found.

CPH Study Session Webinars. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: ASPPH hosts a series of online study sessions in January to help Certified in Public Health (CPH) candidates prepare for the CPH exam. Each study session is led by expert faculty from ASPPH member schools and programs and focuses on one of the core areas of public health: behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, cross-cutting areas, environmental health, epidemiology, and health policy and management. Each session is two to three hours long and include lectures and interactive segments.

Build Power for Health Equity: Strategic Practices for Local Health Departments. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Dialogue4Health. Presenter(s): Renee Canady, PhD; Jacques Colon; Sarah Hernandez, Jonathan Heller, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar describes a set of “inside” and “outside” strategic practices that public local health departments can use to advance equity. The panelists provide concrete examples of how they have implemented these practices, their lessons learned, and their practical guidance to local health department staff interested in tackling similar efforts. Specific practices such as hiring and contracting, staff training, partnering with community organizing groups, and using Health in All Policies are covered during this training. Broader themes to be discussed include confronting the root causes of inequity and supporting leadership and innovation to advance equity.

A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. Presenter(s): Barbara Brandt, Patricia A. Cuff, Sandra D. Lane, Julian Fisher, Bianca Frogner. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar discusses how each speaker has used and implemented specific aspects of the Framework including: • a description of Interprofessional courses built upon the social determinants of health concept, that utilizes innovative teaching methods and actively engages members of the community for educating students; • an illustration of how a medical education department is finding ways to integrate the framework into the curriculum for health professional training in rural and underserved areas of the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho region; • a description of WHO’s efforts to integrate SDH into health workforce education and training to prepare for integrated people-centered health services, how SDH / IPE are addressed, and how this links to the framework & conceptual model. The Framework was published by the Institute of Medicine in 2016.

The Occupational (Im)Possibilities in a Segregated Neighborhood: A Matter of Justice in LCHD. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Jyothi Gupta, PhD, ORT/L, FAOTA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the sixth in the LCRN’s series on Occupational Therapy and MCH: An Emerging Partnership to Improve Early Family Experiences and Life Course Health Development – features Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA. Dr. Gupta is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and Professor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at St. Catherine University. Her research interests are identifying contextual barriers to full participation of marginalized groups and identifying strategies to maximize participation. This webinar focuses on her experience in applying the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model to one of her community partner sites in rural Mississippi.

Learning Objectives: • Explore the conceptual synergy of life course health development (LCHD) model and the occupational perspective of health and well-being. • Describe the conceptual alignment of the occupational perspective to health development. • Discuss the occupational lives of children living in a racially segregated rural community and potential negative impact on health and well-being.

Sharing the Sandbox: New Evidence about Cross-jurisdictional Sharing for Local Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Gianfranco Pezzino, MD, MPH; Justin Marlowe, PhD, MPA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, speakers present new evidence and examples about cross-jurisdictional resource sharing among local public health jurisdictions. A recording, slides, slide handout, and links to other resources are available. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; policymakers involved in sharing agreements; and public health systems researchers.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local public health jurisdictions can work together to expand prevention efforts by sharing services. • Consider what resource sharing among health jurisdictions might mean for current health transformations.

From Early Adversity to Permanency: Implications for Occupational and Life Course Health Development. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Amy Lynch, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the impact of early adversity and trauma upon the occupational development and success of children developing in an atypical environment - namely those who have experienced foster care and/or international adoption - including the "ripple effect" across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives:

Developing Evidence About Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN, reviews the importance of collecting standardized data and demonstrates how the information is being used to make the case for public health services. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; Program staff and managers working in environmental health and communicable disease prevention. A recording, slides, and a slides handout are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local health department administrative data can be used to demonstrate the value of public health services. • Describe the need for and value of standardized public health services data for public health performance, advocacy, and building evidence. • Describe opportunities for filling critical gaps in local public health services data.

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Communicating Public Health: Message Design Strategies to Promote Awareness and Action to Address Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Jeff Niederdeppe. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: In an event co-sponsored by the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion, guest lecturer Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe from Cornell University presents an overview of how public health communication can assist in addressing social determinants of health and health disparities. He begins the lecture by focusing on what should be communicated in public health messaging and to whom, what situations you are trying to change with your health communications, and knowing what barriers you face in communicating your message.

Learning Objectives: • An understanding that education and awareness may not be enough. • The importance of connecting messages to broader values. • The understanding that opposing messengers are a challenge.

5-Minute MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Varies.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: 5-Minute MCH is a microlearning program designed to cover each of the 12 MCH Leadership Competencies. The program is structured using an easy-to-follow modular format designed to increase knowledge and skills through 5-minute intensive learning sessions. In module 1 of each competency, participants will learn about a new competency through a 5-minute video podcast. This includes learning what knowledge and skill sets each competency contains and how they are important in the daily work of MCH professionals. In module 2 of each competency, participants will receive 5 highly focused learning opportunities for that competency. Learners may take one or all of the trainings to sharpen knowledge and skills. In module 3 of each competency, participants will receive 5 implementation strategies to put knowledge to practice. Learners may share their experiences implementing the strategies on the 5-Minute Portal. In module 4 of each competency, participants will hear a 5-minute presentation from an expert in the field.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.