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Where To Find MCH Resources: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson and John Richards. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This short presentation discusses the information needs of MCH professionals and identifies distinct online resources to address those needs, from pop and professional sources such as Google, PubMed, and Wikipedia to grant-supported resources that address MCHB topical programs and initiatives. Topics include data warehouses, research centers, epidemiology sites, professional and membership organizations

Learning Objectives: • Identify information needs of professionals • Explain the differences between types of online resources • Differentiate between trusted and questionable online resources • Understand where to go to find additional resources

Communicating Science: Translating Research for Policy and Practice. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Slide Module. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 19 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the rationales for and barriers to taking action to ensure that public health science is communicated beyond academic journals and applied to efforts to improve health for individuals and populations. Cameo video commentary from public information staff of the Institute of Medicine is used to share strategies for being competitive in the marketplace of ideas that interventions and policies are derived from. Downloadable slides and a transcript of the presentation are provided at <http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/writing-skills/Transcript-Translational-Writing.pdf>.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the importance of translating research. • Understand the characteristics of both academic researchers and policymakers. • Learn best practices for health professionals to communicate science for use in policy and practice.

Writing Briefing Memos. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation focuses on the nature, elements and specific uses of briefing memos, and tips for writing good ones. By comparing memo writing to the Ikea business model, Ms. Ruderman discusses solutions to writing an effective memo, including using clear visual cues and logical paths, focusing on the memo’s purpose, avoiding jargon, simplifying sentence structure, and presenting and concluding data effectively.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what a briefing memo is and why you would write one. • Describe the IKEA Effect. • Learn how to present data effectively.

Writing Policy Briefs: A Guide to Translating Science and Engaging Stakeholders. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Advanced. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: The challenges, art and craft of writing documents intended to translate science to action (policy, programs, services) are the subjects of this distance education module. While the primary intended audiences are public health students and practicing professionals, faculty at public health and other MCH training and education programs may find useful tools in this module. Learning objectives give emphasis to basic elements and structure of policy briefs, and to skills development in synthesizing data and information in order to communicate effectively with non-science audiences. The module offers an introductory lecture, examples of the skills in action, and structured exercises for completing the process of writing your own policy brief.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the basic elements of a policy brief. • Identify the information needs of different audiences. • Synthesize data to convey policy implications. • Craft concise language. • Organize information effectively.

Special Instructions: To access video, click “Play Lecture” next to “A. Video Lecture: The Art and Craft of Policy Briefs.”

National Institutes of Health Plain Language Online Training. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: National Institutes of Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: In order to communicate health and research messages clearly, the National Institutes of Health suggests using plain language for all documents, presentations, and electronic messages. Plain language is characterized by: • Common, everyday words except for necessary technical terms • Personal pronouns (“we” and “you”) • Active voice • Logical organization • An easy-to-read format, including bullets, tables and free use of whitespace. This Computer-Based Training (CBT) module was developed to introduce health professionals to the basics of plain language. Modules one through seven contain tales of medical history, some exercises, and a summary. The eighth module contains optional exercises for additional practice. A list of websites for use by participants to continue expanding professional writing skills is also provided.

Learning Objectives: • Learn to organize ideas. • Develop a clear writing style. • Learn the skills necessary to become a more effective communicator.

Continuing Education: Certificate of completion offered.

Grant Writing. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Jane Schadle RNC, MSHA. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is part of a the New Public Health Administrators Series, a 14 hour-long online program targeted toward new public health administrators and nursing administrators. This course may be taken by itself, or as part of the New Public Health Admin (NPHA) Curriculum. Grant Writing, by Jane Schadle - consists of a one hour video segment which is accessible via video streaming technology. PowerPoint slides of the presentation are provided in PDF format. Participants will be assessed through practice exercises and an online post-test.

Learning Objectives: • Identify grant awarding organizations in Iowa. • Describe the steps involved in preparing a grant application. • Describe the resources needed in preparing a grant application. • Discuss the reporting obligations once a grant is awarded. • Discuss the implications of grant awards to agency budgets.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.