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The Use of Social Media to Enhance Communication and Dissemination. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Association of University Centers on Disabilities. Presenter(s): Courtney Taylor, Emma Shouse, Elizabeth Bishop, Francisca Guzman, Crystal K. Pariseau. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 73 minutes.

Annotation: In today's technological driven society, the use of social media continues to increase and impact the disability world. Social media has certainly become a means to communicate and disseminate information. This webinar features a panel of AUCD and Developmental Disabilities Network Partners and discusses some innovative statewide and national collaborations.

Begin Your Path to Capitalizing the Cloud. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Govloop. Presenter(s): Pat Florenza, Sherwin McAdam. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Every agency, state and city is looking for that game changing "do more with less" tool. When implemented correctly, the cloud can be that tool. It can transform a government agency. The cloud allows us to easily collaborate, share resources, receive on demand computing power, and change the way we deliver services to citizens. This webinar, presented by government and industry thought leaders discusses the following: • How the cloud is transforming government • Best practices and strategies to adopt the right cloud solution for your agency. • Case studies and lessons learned from agencies that have successfully deployed the cloud.

Social Media: Changing Communication and Interventions in Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This broadcast introduces public health workers to the various social media tools that are available, the demographics that use these tools, and the benefits and drawbacks of using each of them. Speakers discuss specific strategies used and share both success stories in using social media, as well as important lessons learned in overcoming barriers, maximizing efficiency, and discovering the most effective way to use the available tools to impact public health outcomes.

Social Marketing. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): David Steffen, PhD, Claudia Fernandez, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This 40-minute slide presentation discusses what has now become a prominent part of public health: social marketing, which is a subset of public health marketing. The presentation discusses the differences between these two types of marketing and the benefits/disadvantages of each, including several definitions of social marketing. Social marketing focuses on improving both individual and societal outcomes through voluntary behavior and is evidence-based. Examples of social marketing campaigns, examples of organizations that use social marketing, and the benefits of social marketing are provided. The presenters also discuss in detail the six phases of social marketing: 1) Describe the Problem, 2) Conduct Target Market Research, 3) Develop the Marketing Strategy, 4) Design Social Marketing Interventions, 5) Plan Program Monitoring and Evaluation, and 6) Implement the Intervention(s) Evaluation. Finally, a case study on diarrhea outbreak in infants is discussed, as well as the Obama Campaign as an example of how to incorporate modern social media. Several resource Web links are provided on the last slide.

Learning Objectives: • Describe social marketing. • Understand how social marketing is different form other marketing tactics. • Understand social marketing's place in public health. • Review case studies of public health social marketing.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Social Marketing (by Dr. David Steffen and Dr. Claudia Fernandez” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.”

Social Media for Public Health Practice: Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Patrick O’Carroll, MD, MPH, FACPM; Bud Nicola. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Practical application of social media in public health is the theme of this presentation. Dr. O’Carroll begins by advocating for the possibilities Twitter and Facebook can have in the public health field. He describes the role, basics and uses of Twitter by showing step-by-step how to join and use the online application. He also creates a table that illustrates when to use each social media tool based on their characteristics. The learner is also provided a guided tour of how to use and join Facebook. Mr. Nicola next describes LinkedIn, a social networking site for professionals and demonstrates how to use the site. Slides of both presentations are available for use. FYI: A short technical interruption occurs at the beginning of the webinar.

Learning Objectives: • Compare how different methods of communication fit different purposes and different audiences. • Describe how to employ a set of “new media” technologies (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) in various aspects of public health practice. • Describe the benefits and limitations of various “new media” technologies as tools for use in a public health setting.

Special Instructions: Registration to PH LearnLink is required. To access the video, click on the “Play the recorded presentation” link under “Session Archive.”

Demystifying Social Media for Public Health Practice: Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Patrick O’Carroll, MD, MPH, FACPM; Bud Nicola. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Practical application of social media in public health is the theme of this presentation. Dr. O’Carroll begins by advocating for the possibilities Twitter and Facebook can have in the public health field. He describes the role, basics and uses of Twitter by showing step-by-step how to join and use the online application. He also creates a table that illustrates when to use each social media tool based on their characteristics. The learner is also provided a guided tour of how to use and join Facebook. Mr. Nicola next describes LinkedIn, a social networking site for professionals and demonstrates how to use the site. Slides of both presentations are available for use. FYI: A short technical interruption occurs at the beginning of the webinar.

Learning Objectives: • Compare how different methods of communication fit different purposes and different audiences. • Describe how to employ a set of “new media” technologies (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) in various aspects of public health practice. • Describe the benefits and limitations of various “new media” technologies as tools for use in a public health setting.

Special Instructions: Registration to PH LearnLink is required. To access the video, click on the “Play the recorded presentation” link under “Session Archive.”

Social Media and Public Health. Year Developed: 2009. Source: TRAIN Connecticut. Presenter(s): Lynn Townshend; R. Craig Lefebvre, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: These conference presentations begin with Ms. Townshend who discusses “Making Social Media Part of Comprehensive Communication Strategy”. She covers how to create a timely communication strategy using new and social media and describes the benefits and shortcoming of utilizing social media. Next Dr. Lefebvre focuses on “New Media Applications and Their Role in Public Health Outreach” by explaining sources, channels and receivers of messages, as well as concepts, behaviors, tools, and landscapes that frame social media. A peanut butter recall campaign example is used to show how using media can be utilized to change health behaviors. His presentation concludes by focusing on the implications of social media in public health programs. Real experiences of a health department and organization utilizing social media, and a question and answer panel, conclude the presentation. FYI: There are some technical issues in the real-life examples and panel discussion sections.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the tools of social media and the audiences they reach. • Describe how to incorporate social media into a health communication strategy. • Identify the benefits and challenges of using social media.

Special Instructions: Registration to TRAIN is required. To access the course, click on the “Registration” tab and then click on “Launch.”

Continuing Education: International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are offered. Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) CEUs are also offered.

Social Marketing and Public Health: Effective Campaigns and How They Work. Year Developed: 2009. Source: MidAtlantic Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): W. Douglas Evans, PhD, MA; Terry Long. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This video provides an overview of social marketing and recent effective public health campaigns. The first presenter, Dr. Evans, discusses social marketing in a broad sense and how it differs from health communications and social media as well as the evidence for effectiveness. The four main theoretical foundations are discussed, followed by various social marketing strategies/tactics commonly used. Dr. Evans discusses major social marketing campaigns recently targeted to adolescents, such as the truth campaign, an anti-tobacco campaign. Additional campaign and initiative examples presented include VERB, mHealth, and text4baby. The second presenter, Terry Long, focuses on the Heart Truth, a successful social marketing campaign initiated by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI, presenting its inception, how it was developed, the implementation strategy, and why it works. She begins with an overview about heart disease and women and the impact of awareness, followed by highlights of the campaign such as the branding power, corporate partnerships, and community action. Finally, the impact of the campaign is discussed. A question and answer session follows the two presentations.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what is social marketing. • Learn social marketing theories and strategies. • Describe principals and evidence of effectiveness.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation, scroll down the page to the embedded video screen and click the “play” button.

Tech It Out: Why Use Social Media. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Wisconsin Clearinghouse for Prevention Resources. Presenter(s): Rajesh Mukherjee. Type: Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 4 minutes.

Annotation: This video provides a basic overview of using social media, including why people would want to use them, common misperceptions, and tips to get started.

In the Know: Social Media for Public Health Webcast Series. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: National Prevention Information Network. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: The "In the Know" webinar archives provide experts in public health, communications, and technology to share their knowledge about how social media can support public health campaigns. Sessions for Series 1 include: Twitter; LinkedIn and Slideshare; Gaming and Mobile; Facebook and Image Sharing (Instagram, Pinterest and Flickr); Google+ and YouTube; and Measurement and Evaluation. Sessions for Series 2 include: The Life Cycle of a Social Media Plan; What’s New in Image & Video Sharing?; What’s New in Social Media?

Special Instructions: Each webcast is archived on SlideShare and in a webinar recording available from NPIN's gateway page.

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