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Using Quality Improvement Tools to Uncover the Root Causes of Health System Issues. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Amanda Cornett, MPH; Donna Lindemulder, MA; Kori Flower, MD, MPH; Pat Bailey, LMSW. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 78 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive skill building session introduces quality improvement tools (e.g. Fishbone, 5 Whys) that can assist states in conducting root cause analysis related to health reform within their state. The session offers state‐specific examples and provide participants an opportunity to apply the tools. The Affordable Care Act offers opportunities to improve public health and health care delivery systems, and ultimately health outcomes for MCH populations. Title V programs are in a position to help lead efforts to implement health system reforms that result in improvement. Success in leading change will require new skills and strategies aimed at collaborating with multidisciplinary partners to address the underlying system issues that negatively impact health.

Race and Ethnicity Matter: Understanding Childhood Obesity through the Lens of Health Equity and Justice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Leadership for Healthy Communities. Presenter(s): Maya Rockeymoore, PhD, Shavon Arline-Bradley, MPH; Kathy Ko Chin, MS; Steven Lopez, MPP/MPH; Olivia Roanhorse, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: This webinar looks at how inequities in social, economic, and environmental justice impact health and the policy and systems changes that are needed to ensure all kids are able to live long, healthy lives. Despite signs that the national childhood obesity rate may be leveling off, many of our most vulnerable youth including African-American, Latino, American Indian, Asian & Pacific Islander American, rural, and low-income children and teens remain disproportionally impacted by the epidemic. These health disparities show that where we live matters and that too many families still lack access to affordable, nutritious foods and safe opportunities to be active.

Special Instructions: Use #healthequity to take part in the conversation on social media.

Population Health Management: Improving Health Where We Live, Work, and Play. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Diabetes Education Program. Presenter(s): Ron Loeppke, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FACPM; Jeanette May, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Transcript

Annotation: This webcast discusses how a population health management approach considers health quality and costs beyond the clinical setting to integrate health information, management, and support into people's daily lives at a time when health care costs are rising and overall health and well-being are declining.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the social, economic, and physical environmental factors that contribute to health. • Find out how employers and communities can work together to control health care spending plus have a positive influence on health outcomes. • Hear how new technologies can be used for patient engagement, education, and management. • Tap into resources for enhancing health management in the workplace, in the home, and in time off.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Public Health 101: A Short Course. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Center for Public Health Practice (Ohio State University). Presenter(s): Unknown. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This course is a basic introduction to public health and consists of seven modules that range from 6-15 minutes in length. The modules provide an introduction to the history, achievements, mission, achievements, structure, challenges, opportunities, and future of public health in the United States. Some of the focus is on Ohio, however the course is still useful for individuals from other states as the Ohio-specific information can be used as an example of the roles and activities of state and local public health. The seven modules are: “What is Public Health?” “History and Achievements,” “Who is Public Health?” “Factors that Influence Public Health,” “Public Health in Ohio,” “Challenges for Public Health,” and “Public Health’s Future”.

Special Instructions: Regsitration necessary to access the training.

Continuing Education: Types of Continuing Education Credits Available: Continuing Education Approved by the Ohio State Board of Sanitarian Registration for 1.5 hours. The Center for Public Health Practice (MEP2939) is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education; this program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I contact hours in health education. The course is approved for 1.5 CPH CEs. Approved by the Ohio Nurses Association (OBN-001-91), an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation for 1.5 contact hours. Contact Shirley Funt at 614-292-1637 or cphp-registration@cph.osu.edu for more information about continuing education contact hours.”

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

Orientation to the Essentials of Public Health (Introductory Level). Year Developed: 2009. Source: South Central Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): South Central Public Health Training Center. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This short course briefly introduces the field of public health and its major components. After completing an introductory assessment, participants will watch a short video on the history, core functions, essential services, and definition of public health. In addition, the video describes Healthy People objectives, the public health workforce, health disparities, and current threats and challenges facing the field. Many examples are taken from southern states served by the South Central Public Health Partnership; however the lessons apply to public health across the nation.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the history of public health in the United States. • List principle concerns of public health in the 20th century. • Name and describe the 10 core functions of public health. • Explain the role of public health in today’s society.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Orientation to Essentials of Public Health, Introductory Level.”

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

Orientation to the Essentials of Public Health (Intermediate Level). Year Developed: 2006. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Patrick Flaherty, MPP. Type: Video Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 240 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This six-module course covers the basics of public health and includes pdf group activity exercises. Module 1 covers the history of public health in the United States and the current state of public health values, ethics and law. Module 2 discusses the concept, determinants and measurement of health status, with particular focus on the Healthy People objectives. Module 3 covers the three core functions and ten essential services of public health, also introducing the National Public Health Performance Standards Program (NPHPSP). Module 4 compares public health functions at the local, state, and federal level, and discusses the role of collaborations/partnerships and community planning (specifically the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) model). Module 5 summarizes the core competencies of public health and describes the current public health workforce. Module 6 looks towards the future, discussing some future challenges and strategies for improving public health. Through the lecture, the presenters introduce activities and worksheets to assist the participant in learning important concepts and synthesize the new information.

Learning Objectives: Module 1: History, values, ethics and legal basis of public health • Describe early movements that influenced public health and the key individuals. • Describe the different eras of public health from 1800-2000. • Describe successes/achievements in public health history. • Identify the ethics and values that make public health a unique profession. • Describe the legal basis for public health in America. Module 2: How to define and how to measure health • Identify different definitions of health - including physical, mental, and social well-being. • Describe factors that influence health. • List the ten leading causes of death and the actual causes of death. • Describe health measurement activities such as Healthy People 2010. Module 3: Framework of public health and how it has evolved over time • Describe the difference between population-based public health and personal health services. • Identify the three core functions and ten essential services in public health, and explain their historical development. • Identify strategies to incorporate additional essential services into the participant's program area. • Describe the National Public Health Performance Standards Program and its impact on public health practice. Module 4: Basic steps of community health improvement processes • Describe how the local, state, and federal levels of government impact health. • Describe the importance of collaborations and coalitions, and the basic steps in coalition development. • Describe the community planning model in public health - Mobilizing Action through Planning and Partnerships. Module 5: The competencies needed by public health professionals to support systems that perform the essential services • Identify the eight competency domains for public health workers. • Understand the relationship between core competencies for public health workers and the essential services. • Identify strategies to strengthen individual competencies. Module 6: Future challenges in public health, identify trends, and see yourself as an agent of change • Identify key questions professionals ask in creating a new future. • Identify major challenges facing the public health system in their communities. • Identify new or changed roles for their programs and for themselves based on this course.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, you should login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Orientation to Essentials of Public Health, Intermediate Level.”

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

Orientation to the Essentials of Public Health (Advanced Level). Year Developed: 2006. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Carolyn C. Johnson, PhD, NCC, LPC; Thomas Farley, MD MPH; Joan Wightkin, Richard Culbertson. Type: Video Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 240 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This four-module course describes the basics and some advanced components of public health. Module 1 considers the philosophical and historic foundation of public health with additional focus on the concept, determinants and measurement of health. After defining public health and its unique features, this module also discusses the history of the development of the core functions and essential services of public health. Module 2 covers public health at the federal, state, and local levels, with particular emphasis on the application of essential services and connections between levels. Module 3 discusses the concept of assessment in more detail, describing common elements, methods, and data sources. Module 4 describes the ethical foundations of public health, with an introduction to schools of ethical thought, fundamental principles and future ethical challenges. Note: A multi-step registeration process is required to access the module.

Learning Objectives: Module 1: Philosophical and Historical Perspectives of Public Health Module 1, Part 1 • Recognize the difficulty in defining health. • Explain the various definitions of health. • Develop your own definition of health based on your own work priorities. Module 1, Part 2 • Describe population-based measurements of health. • Recognize tools for health promotion and behavior change are available. • Discuss future goals for the nation. Module 1, Part 3 • Identify the domains of health determinants. • List and critically evaluate examples of health determinants in each domain. Module 1, Part 4 • Explain public health. • Argue the pros and cons of public health as a profession. • Describe components and images of public health. Module 1, Part 5 • Discuss the evolution of public health. • Describe the actions of historical heroes in public health. • Discuss public health’s achievements during the 20th century. Module 1, Part 6 • Identify the three core functions for public health work. • Translate the core functions into public health practice. • Apply the core functions of public health to your own work. Module 1, Part 7 • Discuss the unique features (core values) of public health. • Critically evaluate the interaction of these unique features. Module 1, Part 8 • Identify public health’s 10 essential services. • Discuss the practical implications of the essential services. • Compare your own work with the essential services that form the framework of public health. Module 2: The Structure of Public Health • Differentiate and compare local, state and federal public health roles and responsibilities. • Identify funding sources and how they are appropriated via the three levels. Module 3: Assessment as a Core Function Module 3, Part 1 • Explain how assessment fits in as a public health core function. • Describe ways to measure health status and disease rates in population. • Name the importance for monitoring trends in diseases. • Identify ways to find subpopulations at elevated risk. • Determine modifiable antecedents to disease. Module 3, Part 2 • List methods of assessment in assessing the health of a population. • Name forms of surveillance data collection. • Explain how to analyze, interpret and disseminate surveillance data. • Explain how vital statistics are used in assessment and the purpose of using special studies. • List questions and measures that are useful when evaluating public health programs. • Name both federal and state sources of data for overall health assessment. Module 4: The Culture of Public Health • Compare and contrast the ethical bases of public health and medical care. • Explain similarities and differences between law and ethics. • Define the philosophical and religious bases of ethics. • Explain the ethical foundations of public health and their impact on target constituencies.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, you should login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Orientation to Essentials of Public Health, Advanced Level.”

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

Principles of Public Health: PH 101. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Utah Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course Training Series. Level: Introductory. Length: 240 minutes.

Annotation: This twelve-module course describes public health and its role in improving the health of populations, using video, exercises and pdf of slides. The first module covers the definition and history of public health. The second module discusses the difference between public health and biomedicine, and covers definitions, measurement, and determinants of health. The third module covers health disparities, risk factors, cultural competency, and barriers to health care and specific examples of current disparities. The fourth module provides more information on culture, diversity, and how they impact health and health care today. The fifth module describes the state of medical and public health funding and the types of public health agencies and organizations, with particular focus on those in California and Hawaii. Module six introduces the core functions and essential services of public health, and also introduces the purpose implications of the Healthy People objectives. The seventh module describes public health law within the context of the US legal system, providing a case study of tobacco regulation to illustrate key concepts. Modules eight and nine cover three particular disciplines within public health, Environmental Health (module eight) and Biostatistics and Epidemiology (module nine). The tenth module defines and differentiates between different types of evaluations, with particular focus on measurement tools and reasons for performing evaluations. The eleventh module describes community needs assessments (CNAs), defining important terms and presenting a five-step process to CNAs. The last module describes current and future challenges for the field of public health (such as health care access, new morbidities and terrorism threats), and implications for the public health workforce. Learning is assessed and reinforced through the course with short evaluations. Also available in Spanish.

Learning Objectives:

Special Instructions: Registration to Pacific Public Health Training Center is required to access. After log in click on “Principles of Public Health (PH101)” and then click on the specific topic tutorial your wish to view. PDF slides are available.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.