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Displaying records 1 through 5 of 5 found.

Child Health and Development. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Open Courseware . Presenter(s): Robert Blum, MD, MPH, PhD; Lynne Michael Blum, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 16 sessions.

Annotation: This 16-session course focuses on early to middle childhood growth and development. With a focus on the core processes, the course examines developmental theories, research, and issues associated with physical, social, emotional, and cognitive growth and development. It describes instruments used to assess growth and development and reviews evaluations of efficacy of early intervention programs targeted at children from at-risk populations.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the critical domains of health and development during early and middle childhood. • Apply developmental theory and research methods to a discussion of children's well-being. • Explain the major determinants of health and development during childhood. • Acquire skills needed to effectively communicate about child health and development research to policy makers and the public.

Special Instructions: To access course, use links (Syllabus, Schedule, Lecture Materials, Readings, and Assignments) in the “Course Home” menu on the left of the landing page.

Adolescent Health and Development. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Population and Family Health Sciences. Presenter(s): Robert Blum, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online course aims to help the learner explore adolescence development and health. Divided into sixteen lectures, Dr. Blum discusses physical, psychological, and brain development and its relation to decision-making. The course continues by addressing both national and international trends—including demographics, mortality rates, and participation in health care—and adolescence in the familial context and education system. He addresses relevant health issues the populations faces such as stress, mental health, substance use, violence, and obesity and the resilience framework for explaining stressor coping mechanisms. Reproductive health issues and effective youth programs conclude the course. To further learning, suggested readings and voluntary assignments accompany lectures.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the biological and psychological developmental processes that occur during adolescence and puberty. • Identify major public health issues affecting adolescents both domestically and internationally. • Place the major health concerns affecting adolescents within a conceptual framework to understand their key antecedents and determinates that include risk and protective factors within the biological, social, cultural, behavioral, political, and environmental domains. • Analyze major health concerns affecting adolescents in an effort to recommend effective interventions to improve the health of adolescents. • Explore five topical areas (adolescent depression and suicidality, youth with disabilities, juvenile violence, reproductive health, and adolescent obesity) in depth to understand the interplay of key antecedents and determinates. • Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking by preparing a final paper on a major public health concern affecting adolescents that includes a description of the magnitude of the concern, a conceptual framework, analysis of the issue and a recommended intervention based on intervention research.

Special Instructions: To access course, use links (Syllabus, Schedule, Lecture Materials, Readings, and Assignments) in the “Course Home” menu on the left of the landing page.

Social Determinants of Maternal and Child Health: Data, Policy Implications and Opportunities. Year Developed: 2010. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Paula Braverman, MD, MPH; Wilhelmine Miller, MS, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Social determinants of health are factors such as income, education, occupation, employment, housing, child care, family structure, and neighborhood characteristics, which are thought to have powerful effects on health and yet are beyond the reach of medical care. This program features two experts in the field who will discuss current data on the topic, as well as opportunities for addressing disparities in maternal and child health. The first presenter will be Dr. Dr. Paula Braveman, Professor of Family and Community Medicine and Director of the Center on Social Disparities in Health at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Braveman will provide a broad overview of current knowledge of the social determinants of maternal and child health and a conceptual framework for thinking about and addressing them. The second presenter will be Dr. Wilhelmine Miller, Senior Fellow with NORC at the University of Chicago and a Professorial Lecturer in Health Policy, George Washington University. Dr. Miller will review effective, non-clinical interventions for reducing the risks to healthy child development consequent to social and economic disadvantage and consider the adequacy of current levels of social investments in the well-being of low-income families with infants and young children. Current federal policies and funding for services to promote healthy early development will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Physical Activity in Child Care Settings: Research Findings and Policy Implications. Year Developed: 2010. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Michael Kogan, PhD; Russell R. Pate, PhD; Dianne Stanton Ward, EdD; James F. Sallis, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar discussed data on children’s physical activity levels, along with information on associated demographic and environmental factors. It also discussed best practice guidelines and programmatic and policy-level opportunities for increasing physical activity in child care settings.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Children's Emotional, Behavioral, and Developmental Well-Being: New Data and Tools for the Field. Year Developed: 2010. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Reem M. Ghandour, DrPH, MPA; James M. Perrin, MD, FAAP; Jane M. Foy, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar covers changing trends and interventions for improving children’s wellbeing, specifically in mental health and development. In the first part, Dr. Perrin discusses trends in chronic diseases in children, such as asthma, obesity and autism. Next, Dr. Ghandour presents data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health on the prevalence of emotional and behavioral disorders, and addresses the current rates of service provisions across the United States. Dr. Foy furthermore discusses the role of public health in combating child mental illness, including a description of useful resources. The web conference concludes with a short question and answer session as well as correlating pdf of responses.

Learning Objectives: • Provide an overview of the nature and extent of mental health problems among children in the US. • Share latest data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH). • Focus on geographic disparities. • Stimulate discussion of the role the public health community can play in addressing the epidemic of pediatric mental illness.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.