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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 46 found.

Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Training Course in Maternal and Child Healthh (MCH) Epidemiology. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMATCH. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This national program is aimed primarily at professionals in state and local health agencies who have significant responsibility for collecting, processing, analyzing, and reporting Maternal And Child Health data. On different years the course is geared to individuals with beginning to intermediate or intermediate to advanced skills in statistical and epidemiologic methods, preferably in MCH or a related field.

Integrating Early Childhood Data. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Dabney, Carlise King. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: Data from both the early childhood and K–12 sectors can help policymakers inform policy discussions and funding decisions; chart the progress of children, programs, and the state; strengthen and support the early childhood workforce; and pinpoint best practices and areas of need. Linking limited, but critical, early childhood and K–12 data can help states know whether policies and programs successfully transition children from early childhood to the classroom and get them ready for school. During the webinar hear from the Early Childhood Data Collaborative and Data Quality Campaign about how state legislators and policymakers can support the linkage and use of early childhood and K-12 data to inform policy and improve child outcomes.

CPH Study Session Webinars. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: ASPPH hosts a series of online study sessions in January to help Certified in Public Health (CPH) candidates prepare for the CPH exam. Each study session is led by expert faculty from ASPPH member schools and programs and focuses on one of the core areas of public health: behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, cross-cutting areas, environmental health, epidemiology, and health policy and management. Each session is two to three hours long and include lectures and interactive segments.

Beyond the SEA: Data Science 101--An Introduction for Librarians. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern Atlantic Region. Presenter(s): Lisa Federer, MA, MLIS. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 61 minutes. Registration Link

Annotation: The term “big data” is often tossed around in conversations about science, but what does it really mean? This webinar explains what big data is and provides an introduction to the data science techniques that can be used to analyze it. The presenter talks about how data science can help researchers find meaning in data and discuss some of the common techniques and tools used in a variety of different research areas.

Special Instructions: Free account with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine required. Presented on the webex platform.

Continuing Education: 1.0 hour of continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association

Disparities in the Health and Well-Being of Children and Youth in Rural Areas of the United States. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Janice Probst, PhD; Alana Knudson, PhD; Steve Holve, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: A presentation of recent data from national surveys and data sets on access, health status, and mortality patterns for children and youth in rural areas, along with resources and information on improving the health of these populations.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Vitally Important: Improving the Timeliness of Vital Statistics to Advance MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Patricia W. Potrzebowski, PhD; Glenn Copeland, MBA; John Paulson. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: This presentation focuses on how states are working to improve vital statistics timeliness and data sharing, and how this is helping to inform and improve programs and health outcomes for women and infants. Topics include the importance and need for improving timeliness of vital records data; efforts underway to make vital statistics more current and thus more useful for public health program purposes; work being done to provide more timely data on infant mortality in Michigan in order to better inform programs working to improve outcomes, with a focus on the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (COIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality; and how Ohio compiles, augments, and uses the data in its public health data warehouse with a focus on using the State and Territorial Exchange of Vital Events (STEVE) System. Vital statistics—the data and health indicators collected from vital records on births and deaths—are an important source of data for answering national and state health questions. Birth and death records allow states to track maternal, fetal, and infant mortality, adverse birth outcomes, delivery characteristics, and maternal risk factors, among other statistics. Improving the timeliness of these records is essential to making sure they are most useful for monitoring and advancing public health efforts in real time.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

The Perinatal Periods of Risk: Phase 2 Analytic Methods. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CityMatCH. Presenter(s): William M. Sappenfield, MD, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 slides. Audio

Annotation: This webinar for the 2015 Training Course in MCH Epidemiology describes the second part of the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) Approach, including data, methods, risk factors, infant risk factors, maternal care data, and integrating fetal infant mortality review. The webinar includes an exercise at http://www.citymatch.org/sites/default/files/documents/MCHEPITraining/2015/7%20Group%20Exercises/1A.%20PPOR%20Exercise%20June%202015.pdf and exercise answer key at http://www.citymatch.org/sites/default/files/documents/MCHEPITraining/2015/7%20Group%20Exercises/1B.%20PPOR%20Exercise%20Key%20June%202015.pdf.

The Perinatal Periods of Risk Approach: Introduction and Phase 1 Analytic Methods. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CityMatCH. Presenter(s): William M. Sappenfield, MD, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 46 slides. Second part of audio

Annotation: This webinar for the 2015 Training Course in MCH Epidemiology describes the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) Approach, including analytic readiness, required data, data quality, how fetal and infant deaths are mapped, steps in analysis, and exercises. The slides of the webinar are available here: http://www.citymatch.org/sites/default/files/documents/MCHEPITraining/2015/3%20Tuesday/4a.%20PPOR%20Orientation%20Phase%201%20and%20Exercise%20%20%20-%20TU.pdf

Progress on the Redesign of the NSCH and the Data Resource Center. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Rheem Ghandour, DrPH, MPA; Christina Bethell, PhD, MBA, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) is funded and directed by MCHB with data collection coordinated by the U.S. Census Bureau. The survey examines the physical and emotional health of children from birth through 17 years of age with emphasis on factors that may be related to the well-being of children, including medical homes, family interactions, parental health, school experiences, and neighborhood safety. It has been redesigned, and will now also include new and revised content on a range of topics, including items of special relevance to Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and their families. The speakers will give an overview of the new NSCH as well as show how the Data Resource Center (DRC) resources can help optimize the use of the NSCH as well as other data on child and family health.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.