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Displaying records 1 through 6 of 6 found.

Dealing with Difficult Coaching Situations. Year Developed: 2015?. Source: Association of Public Health Laboratories. Presenter(s): Linda M. Raudenbush, EdD, PCC. Type: n.a.. Level: Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Coaching is a grounded in a trust-based relationship. Coaching conversations are held in psychologically safe environments. Fundamental concepts will be provided for both the coach and the coachee, enabling them to develop trust-based relationships and psychologically safe environments for coaching conversations. This webinar includes processes and examples of how to leverage the coaching relationship through support and challenge. Coachees who are better able to work through their difficult situations can better achieve their goals while experiencing fulfilling professional lives.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss a coaching process which maximizes human potential in the context of trust-based, psychologically safe coaching relationships. • Describe the coaching competencies required to align the coach and coachee. • Demonstrate how to use a coaching process and skills in order to deal effectively with difficult situations

Special Instructions: Requires registration. Available May 1, 2015 - December 31, 2018.

Continuing Education: Approved for 1.5 P.A.C.E. or Florida Credits; CEUs accepted by all licensure states. CEUs are valid from May 1, 2015 - April 30, 2017. After that, certificate of attendance is available.

Beginning Your Mentor Relationship. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Mentor Program. Presenter(s): Unknown. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: This narrated slide presentation provides an overview of the benefits of a mentor relationship, outcomes for students and mentors, expectations, and goals. Information about setting goals, suggested activities, and resources are included.

Learning Objectives: • Provide an overview of benefits and expectations of mentoring relationships. • Learn how to set mentoring goals. • Provide strategies for initiating a mentoring relationship.

Mentoring in Our Lives: The Voices of Students and Maternal and Child Health Professionals. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Harolyn Belcher, MD, MHS; Christine Chan; Lucy Guevara; Stacy Hodgkinson, PhD; Kristin Hunt, PhD; Michael Jenkins, MPH; Sabrina Roundtree; Damian Waters. Type: Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Fifty-three videos ranging in length from 28 seconds to 5 minutes, 29 seconds each.

Annotation: This resource offers excerpts from interviews with students and maternal and child health professionals from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented in MCH Training programs telling their own stories about the role mentoring has played in their lives. Their stories reflect themes similar to those identified in the literature review completed for this project and in previous conversations with students and junior faculty. Their stories bring the literature findings to life and present the importance of mentoring in their respective journeys to becoming healthcare and public health professionals.

Special Instructions: Scroll to Stories That Bring the Literature to Life and select a topic, then interviewee.

Mentoring and Coaching. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Louis Rowitz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation Podcast. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 120 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: The purpose of this course is to distinguish the difference between a mentor and a coach, how to develop strategies for picking a mentor or coach, and how to shape and structure these relationships. The different benefits of these relationships are also touched upon. The presenter discusses the importance of and how to develop a learning contract to help in this process. Exercises are included to help understand how to use a learning contract and how to choose a mentor or coach.

Learning Objectives: • Distinguish between mentoring and coaching. • Develop strategies for picking a coach or mentor. • Learn to develop a learning contract. • Identify the steps in structuring a coaching relationship. • List the benefits of coaching and mentoring relationships.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “How to Manage Conflict so it Doesn’t Manage You.” [Note: videos may not be compatible with Apple computers.]

Coaching and Mentoring: Learning with and from Others. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Sheila W. Chauvin, PhD, MEd. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 180 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This course examines how individuals can purposefully learn with and from others. It focuses on the continuum of supportive relationships and the different definitions of these learning activities, including role modeling, coaching, advising, supervising, and mentoring. Dr. Chauvin continues by describing coaching and mentoring from the perspectives of a protégé and as of a mentor. Stages of establishing a mentoring relationship and organizational considerations conclude the module. Worksheets and tools are available to aid in learning.

Learning Objectives: • Differentiate role model, coach, advisor, supervisor, mentor. • Reflect on personal needs and preferences. • Enhance one’s use of coaching and feedback. • Enhance one’s use of mentoring relationships. • Explain each stage of the mentoring process. • Appreciate the role of individual and organizational influences on mentoring.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on "Course Offerings" and search for "Coaching and Mentoring: Learning with and from Others". [Note: videos may not be compatible with Macs]

Developing People (Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Leadership Skills Development Series Module 6). Year Developed: 2008. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Kathleen Edwards, PhD; Michael Fraser, PhD; Holly Grason, MA; Laura Kavanagh, MPP. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Module 6 of the MCH Leadership Development Series includes 6 separate themes for use in either group or individual settings, with discussion questions, interviews with MCH leaders, and self-reflections. Section 1 includes a 10 minute panel introduction to developing people with Kathleen Edwards, Michael Fraser, Holly Grason, and Laura Kavanagh. Section 2 concentrates on organizational environments to support developing people, with an exercise and a 15 minute video clip of the above panel. Section 3 focuses on motivating employees with a story and exercise to help facilitate dialogue. The panel discussion continues in Section 4, discussing developing people from different backgrounds, demographics and generations. This theme, as well as section 5, also links to a 60 minute presentation on mentoring from Carol Woltring, MPH, from the Center for Health Leadership and Practice at the Public Health Institute. She presents why mentoring new professionals is necessary, as well as the process, tools and activities needed to provide an effective mentor relationship. Section 5 further focuses on mentoring, including a networking tip sheet and three clips from the panel on supervising and coaching versus mentoring, and risks in developing professionals. Lastly, the panel is further used in Section 6 to address avenues toward leadership.

Learning Objectives: Module 1: • Participants will identify characteristics they consider important to leadership. • Participants will identify their own leadership qualities and those they would like to further develop. • Participants will understand the difference between management and leadership in the context of organizational development. • Participants will be able to apply their concepts of leadership to a case study scenario. Module 2: • Participants will appreciate how self-limiting models weaken creativity and thinking processes. • Participants will understand the importance of shared vision. • Participants will be able to discriminate between a good shared vision and a poor one. • Participants will know the steps in nurturing a good shared vision. Module 3: • Participants will appreciate the different functional (as opposed to professional) roles teams members play. • Participants will draw from their and their colleagues’ experiences to identify effective and ineffective team dynamics. • Participants will understand the role of leadership in fostering an organizational climate that empowers and inspires people. Module 4: • Participants will examine their personal views of, and reactions to, conflict. • Participants will examine the effects of their emotions on their effectiveness at work. • Participants will enhance their communication and negotiation skills to more productively deal with conflict. • Participants will learn and apply new strategies for analyzing and responding to conflict. Module 5: • Participants will understand the roles of behavior and emotion in resistance to organizational change. • Participants will be able to assess and influence an organization’s readiness for change. • Participants will understand the critical steps in creating and maintaining a successful change effort. • Participants will examine strategies both for leading change and for responding to change in their own organizations.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.