Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 4 of 4 found. Sorted by

Quality Improvement Training Spotlight. Year Developed: 2012. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Beth DeFrancis, MLS; Keisha Watson, PhD. Type: Training Series. Level: Intermediate Introductory Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This collection of over 45 learning opportunities (ranging from introductory to advanced), gathered by the MCH Navigator, presents trainings and resources to assist Title V staff and grantees with understanding and implementing quality improvement initiatives. Resource include: (1) references and tools; (2) quick study YouTube videos; (3) trainings and short Web tutorials; (4) resource organizations; (5) journal articles and white papers; and (6) selected state examples.

Quality Improvement Quick Guide Tutorial. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation. Presenter(s): Public Health Foundation . Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: The problem solving steps of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PFCA) are the focus of this tutorial. An STI case example is used to explore and frame this model in detail. Quality Improvement in Public Health is defined as well. Optional audio-only, slides-only or video are available to complete the tutorial via the learner’s preference. A knowledge assessment is available for personal evaluation.

Learning Objectives: • Identify quality improvement (QI) tools in the Public Health Foundation’s online resource centers. • List the main problem solving steps of Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA).

Maximizing your Program’s Potential with Continuous Quality Improvement (Capacity Building Webinar 3). Year Developed: 2010. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Grace Gorenflo. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter summarizes the purposes and benefits of continuous quality improvement (CQI). She begins by explaining the process of conducting CQI, and then reviews the PDCA framework, using an example of a home visitation program. She concludes the presentation with a discussion of the differences between CQI and program evaluation. Reference materials are available through links provided in the presentation.

Learning Objectives: • Define CQI. • Describe the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) process. • Understand the difference between quality improvement and evaluation. • Identify 1 - 2 examples of how to apply CQI to a home visitation program.

Continuing Education: CME for non-physicians may receive a certificate of participation; CME for physicians, CNE, and CECH CEUS of 1.5 hours are available; .15 IACET CEUs are available.

Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement and Evaluation. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Missouri Institute for Community Health, Kansas TRAIN. Presenter(s): Marty Galutia. Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive module helps learners understand the basics of evaluative thinking in the context of process evaluation by addressing the differences between asking questions, gathering data, analyzing data and implementing change. The tutorial details the 4 steps in process evaluation, using a video example from a real health department’s processes.

Special Instructions: Registration is required. Click on the"Registration" tab. Click on "Course Search" then search for "Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement and Evaluation". Check software compliance for training portal.

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

New Search

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.