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Displaying records 1 through 7 of 7 found.

A New Approach to Assessing Family Engagement in Health Care Systems. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Beth Dworetzky; Nanfi Lubogo; Susan Chacon. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health care providers, payers, and systems serving children, youth and families increasingly focus on family engagement as a strategy to improve health care delivery, enhance consumer and provider satisfaction, and reduce costs. Assessing how well an organization or agency is engaging families is a critical step in achieving these goals. A recent issue brief from Family Voices, A Framework for Assessing Family Engagement in Systems Change, proposes four domains of family engagement – representation, transparency, impact and commitment. Join us as we explore this framework, share models of success and discuss common barriers to incorporating meaningful family engagement in systems-level initiatives. It is recommended that attendees read the issue brief prior to the event.

Measuring Family Experience of Care Integration to Improve Care Delivery. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Hannah Rosenberg, MSc; Rebecca Baum, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 31 minutes.

Annotation: The family perception of care integration is essential in identifying opportunities to improve processes of care coordination and care management. This June 15 webinar introduced the Pediatric Integrated Care Survey (PICS), a validated instrument developed by Richard Antonelli, MD, MS, Medical Director of Integrated Care at Boston Children's Hospital, and his team. The instrument assesses family experience of care integration. It asks family respondents to identify the members of their child's/youth's care team and report on their experiences with integration across disciplines, institutions, and communities. A video and presentation slides are available.

Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Yale University. Presenter(s): Leslie Curry, PhD, MPH. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This six module series of lectures from Yale University introduces the learner to the qualitative reseearch. The course creators say: Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including (1) what is qualitative research; (2) developing a qualitative research question; how to use the most common methods, (3) in-depth interviews and (4) focus groups; (5) data analysis; and (6) scientific rigor. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences.

Quality Improvement Training Spotlight. Year Developed: 2012. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Beth DeFrancis, MLS; Keisha Watson, PhD. Type: Training Series. Level: Intermediate Introductory Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This collection of over 45 learning opportunities (ranging from introductory to advanced), gathered by the MCH Navigator, presents trainings and resources to assist Title V staff and grantees with understanding and implementing quality improvement initiatives. Resource include: (1) references and tools; (2) quick study YouTube videos; (3) trainings and short Web tutorials; (4) resource organizations; (5) journal articles and white papers; and (6) selected state examples.

Quality Improvement Quick Guide Tutorial. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation. Presenter(s): Public Health Foundation . Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: The problem solving steps of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PFCA) are the focus of this tutorial. An STI case example is used to explore and frame this model in detail. Quality Improvement in Public Health is defined as well. Optional audio-only, slides-only or video are available to complete the tutorial via the learner’s preference. A knowledge assessment is available for personal evaluation.

Learning Objectives: • Identify quality improvement (QI) tools in the Public Health Foundation’s online resource centers. • List the main problem solving steps of Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA).

Maximizing your Program’s Potential with Continuous Quality Improvement (Capacity Building Webinar 3). Year Developed: 2010. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Grace Gorenflo. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter summarizes the purposes and benefits of continuous quality improvement (CQI). She begins by explaining the process of conducting CQI, and then reviews the PDCA framework, using an example of a home visitation program. She concludes the presentation with a discussion of the differences between CQI and program evaluation. Reference materials are available through links provided in the presentation.

Learning Objectives: • Define CQI. • Describe the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) process. • Understand the difference between quality improvement and evaluation. • Identify 1 - 2 examples of how to apply CQI to a home visitation program.

Continuing Education: CME for non-physicians may receive a certificate of participation; CME for physicians, CNE, and CECH CEUS of 1.5 hours are available; .15 IACET CEUs are available.

Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement and Evaluation. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Missouri Institute for Community Health, Kansas TRAIN. Presenter(s): Marty Galutia. Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive module helps learners understand the basics of evaluative thinking in the context of process evaluation by addressing the differences between asking questions, gathering data, analyzing data and implementing change. The tutorial details the 4 steps in process evaluation, using a video example from a real health department’s processes.

Special Instructions: Registration is required. Click on the"Registration" tab. Click on "Course Search" then search for "Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement and Evaluation". Check software compliance for training portal.

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.