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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 11 found.

Implementation Brief: Working with Communities and Systems. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced. Podcast

Annotation: This training brief provides specific learning opportunities and resources for use by the Title V workforce that focus on how to implement and execute skills associated with working with communities and systems. A podcast about the topic is included.

Measuring Family Experience of Care Integration to Improve Care Delivery. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Hannah Rosenberg, MSc; Rebecca Baum, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 31 minutes.

Annotation: The family perception of care integration is essential in identifying opportunities to improve processes of care coordination and care management. This June 15 webinar introduced the Pediatric Integrated Care Survey (PICS), a validated instrument developed by Richard Antonelli, MD, MS, Medical Director of Integrated Care at Boston Children's Hospital, and his team. The instrument assesses family experience of care integration. It asks family respondents to identify the members of their child's/youth's care team and report on their experiences with integration across disciplines, institutions, and communities. A video and presentation slides are available.

Life Course Health Development of Individuals with Cerebral Palsy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Briano Di Rezze, PhD; Matthew Freeman, MA; Robert Palisano, PT, ScD, FAPTA; Debra Stewart, MSc, OT Reg. (Ont.). Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15:05 minutes.

Annotation: Together these researchers from the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research share their interpretive description of lifecourse health development of individuals with cerebral palsy to promote developmental capacities for future roles and healthy adult living beginning in childhood.

Family-Centered Care Training Brief. Year Developed: 2015. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on learning opportunities aimed to assist MCH professionals increase their knowledge and skills of the family-centered system of care and improve the health outcomes of women, children and families.

Improving the System of Services for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs: Findings from a Review of the State Implementation Grant Program. Year Developed: 2012. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Lynda Honberg; Kathleen Watters. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the nature and needs of the population of children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) within the context of MCHB’s values and tenets for the system of care. Specific topics covered include definition of the population; the legislative and policy basis for the Title V (SSA) role in serving the CYSHCN population; and concepts and components of systems building, including quality and accountability/measurement. Parent, federal and state policy perspectives are incorporated into the presentation narrative, as well as examples of states’ systems endeavors. The 60 minutes of presentation is followed by a 30-minute Q&A discussion.

Special Instructions: Listeners may wish to toggle to 00:5:05 on the video time stamp as the beginning segment involves only participant introductions.

The Affordable Care Act and Children with Special Health Care Needs: An Analysis and Steps for State Policymakers. Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Academy for State Health Policy and the Catalyst Center. Presenter(s): Carol Tobias; Meg Comeau; Kathleen Farrell; Catherine Hess; Liz Fowler; Linda Peltz; Phyllis Sloyer; Steve Fitton. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as it relates to children with special health care needs (CSHCN) or children that are at-risk for chronic conditions that require more services than typical children. The speakers identify CSHCN-specific needs with respect to 1) universal, continuous coverage, 2) adequate coverage, and affordable coverage. For each of the three broad topics, relevant statutory and regulatory provisions are identified and explained, followed by discussion of opportunities and challenges. Steps state policymakers should consider to address needs of CSHCN in health reform are discussed. A companion report can be found at: http://www.catalystctr.org.

Leadership and Advocacy: Trends and Challenges in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Michael Fraser, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: In 1935, Title V of the Social Security Act established a federal-state partnership to address the needs of the maternal and child health population. Over the years, though changes have occurred, Title V remains the oldest federal program dedicated to the health of all mothers and children. Strong leadership and advocacy skills are critical to the program’s success. Program faculty discussed national trends in maternal and child health, national leadership for MCH, current challenges and opportunities, and future directions. *NOTE: This course was originally delivered as a satellite broadcast.

Learning Objectives: • Describe maternal and child health leadership and current challenges and opportunities. • Discuss leadership and the importance of advocacy. • Present applications of maternal and child leadership in current practice settings. • Provide ideas and suggestions for future directions of Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs in light of the Affordable Care Act.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance; CEUs: Nursing 1.5 hours, Social Work 1.5 hours

Family Advocacy and Involvement in Title V Programs. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rylin Rodgers, BA. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes. Registration required

Annotation: This webcast reviews the role of family advocates in collaborating with Title V program staff. The presenter describes the benefits of partnering with family advocates — such as providing different perspectives — and the support advocates can bring to maternal and child health policy and programs. The appropriate roles for family advocates are presented, such as leading advocacy groups, acting as grant reviewers, becoming members of Boards of Trustees, and acting as group facilitators, among other roles. In addition, the skills and training advocates need to successfully collaborate with Title V programs are also discussed. Lastly, the presenter leads a discussion of examples of successful models of partnership such as collaborations within the Alabama Health Department.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the benefits of partnering with families, including advocacy for Title V programs, and supporting maternal and child health policy. • Discuss appropriate roles for family advocates and how Title V programs can operationalize their involvement. • Discuss what skills and training family advocates need to be successful in partnership with Title V programs. • Provide examples of successful models for partnership between family advocates and Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs.

Special Instructions: To access the video, scroll down on the landing page to the “View Program” gray box and choose a player to open the presentation. [Note: Need Real Player or Windows Media Player to watch].

Continuing Education: Nurses 1 hour, Social Workers 1 hour

Family Planning: Critical Safety Net in Hard Times (Part 3). Year Developed: 2009. Source: Future Choices. Presenter(s): Rachel Benson Gold. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: During this video, the speaker describes the current status of the Family Planning Program in the U.S. and the current issues affecting the implementation of the program. She begins by explaining that family planning centers are in 75% of counties in the U.S. and that for most women these centers are used as an entry point into the healthcare system and as a place for basic preventive care. She goes on to outline the reasons why family planning services still only reach half of women who need them and how important it is for family planning services to do more outreach into the community. Next, she discusses the limited funding problem that continuously faces family planning and the few sources of stable funding that exist. Finally, she emphasizes the need for the U.S. to acknowledge and remember that family planning is a health care service than women depend upon and need. Additional web resources are available.

Family Planning: Critical Safety Net in Hard Times (Part 2). Year Developed: 2009. Source: Future Choices. Presenter(s): Rachel Benson Gold. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: During this video, the speaker describes the current status of the Family Planning Program in the U.S. and the current issues affecting the implementation of the program. She begins by explaining that family planning centers are in 75% of counties in the U.S. and that for most women these centers are used as an entry point into the healthcare system and as a place for basic preventive care. She goes on to outline the reasons why family planning services still only reach half of women who need them and how important it is for family planning services to do more outreach into the community. Next, she discusses the limited funding problem that continuously faces family planning and the few sources of stable funding that exist. Finally, she emphasizes the need for the U.S. to acknowledge and remember that family planning is a health care service than women depend upon and need. Additional web resources are available.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.