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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 12 found.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

Influencing Change in Public and Organizational Policy in Support of Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This "Web-based Learning and Reflection" forum is designed to share examples from organizations that have recognized their own limitations in promoting cultural diversity and advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence within human services, or those within the systems in which they are involved, related to the lack of cultural diversity and marginal attention that is given to fostering cultural and linguistic competence.

Learning Objectives: • Define a model of cultural competence including the role of policy in its implementation. • Define linguistic competence (Goode & Jones framework). • Cite legal mandates and requirements (policy directives) for language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. • Describe three approaches to influence change in organizational and public policy that promote cultural diversity and advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about such change.

Communicating Effectively with Limited English Proficient Individuals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Interagency Working Group on Limited English Proficiency. Presenter(s): Aba Obrebski, Kristie Boutte, Chad Bennett, Charmaine Gibson. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: This video training series, in production since 2013, is part of a training toolkit designed to educate federal personnel on interacting with limited English proficient individuals. It was developed in response to the Attorney General’s February 2011 memorandum to all federal agencies, calling upon them to ensure that limited English proficient individuals can access federal government programs and services under Executive Order 13166. The training series is intended to help establish consistent and legally sound practices across the government when engaging in communications with limited English proficient individuals.

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Diversity and Succession Planning. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Sue Plaster, MEd. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This workshop is designed to prepare participants as leaders in their respective public health organizations to both prepare for and take part in structured leadership presentations and conversations about their succession plans. The format of the training and exercises show the participants how to integrate workforce and leadership diversity into each step of their activities. The workshop components include an overview of succession planning with mini-exercises to try out the concepts, explanation of a seven-step succession and diversity presentation method, a review of how staff development activities tie to succession planning work, introduction of templates for succession planning, and a deep dive into the methods for integrating diversity and cultural competence work into succession analysis.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the purpose, terminology and basic methods of succession planning. • Understand methods, approaches and templates for a succession planning and talent review process that integrates diversity into the conversation. • Learn practices that improve diversity sourcing, recruitment and retention. • Discuss how to best integrate workforce diversity status and health equity assessment into succession planning work. • Understand the benefits of linking planning and diversity and have concrete ideas how to do so for their respective organizations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.4 CEU/CE

Strengthening Your MCH Workforce through Cultural Competency (Capacity Building Webinar #4). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Darcel Scharff, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 83 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter discusses strategies to engage and celebrate the communities that local public health professionals serve. Specific examples focus on the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency • Describe the role of cultural competency in workforce development for local public health professionals. • List barriers to becoming culturally competent. • Explain ways in which local public health professionals can become culturally competent. • Identify 1-2 examples of how to apply cultural competence to a workforce development opportunity for a home visitation program.

Continuing Education:

Ready, Willing and Able Online Training. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living and the Kansas Dept. of Health & Environment. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed for the public health, hospital, preparedness, emergency response and disaster relief workforce. Specific training covers disability etiquette, terminology, and communications and assistance techniques during disasters for assisting people with disabilities. The course covers various disaster assistance needs of persons with sight, mobility, hearing and cognitive disabilities. Instruction is given in the video by professional educators with one educator being a person with a disability to enhance the experience of acquainting the audience with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: • Describe different needs populations. • Use correct terminology. • Describe methods to approach persons with disabilities. • Gain skills to better perform your duties. • Describe the characteristics and needs of individuals with disabilities. • Acquire knowledge of best practices. • Provide the best possible outcome for the client/consumer, the responder, and the receiver in the event of a natural or bioterrorist disaster. • Describe the public health role in emergency response in a range of emergencies that might arise. • Describe individual functional role(s) in emergency response and demonstrate the role(s) in regular drills. • Describe communication role(s) in emergency response within the agency, using established communication systems for the agency, general public, personnel, and media. • Identify limits to own knowledge, skills, and authority, and identify key systems for referring matters that exceed these limits. • Apply creative problem solving and flexible thinking to unusual challenges within an individuals functional responsibility and evaluate effectiveness of all actions taken.

Special Instructions: After completing the course and evaluation a certificate of completion will be available through the 'Certificate' link on the right handside of the homepage. 1. This online course will take 2 hrs to complete and includes a pre/post assessment, video, an evaluation and course certificate. 2. Use Internet Explorer or Google Chrome as your browser and high speed Internet service 3. Turn OFF your pop-up blockers 4.Test the compatiblity of your computer for taking this online course: » Click the help button located on the TRAIN Navigation taskbar » Left-hand menu select 'Test Your Environment', Run Test button » All of the checkmarks should be GREEN » If any of the links are RED, click the link and follow the prompts

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.