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Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Influencing Change in Public and Organizational Policy in Support of Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This "Web-based Learning and Reflection" forum is designed to share examples from organizations that have recognized their own limitations in promoting cultural diversity and advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence within human services, or those within the systems in which they are involved, related to the lack of cultural diversity and marginal attention that is given to fostering cultural and linguistic competence.

Learning Objectives: • Define a model of cultural competence including the role of policy in its implementation. • Define linguistic competence (Goode & Jones framework). • Cite legal mandates and requirements (policy directives) for language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. • Describe three approaches to influence change in organizational and public policy that promote cultural diversity and advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about such change.

Exploring Implicit Bias in Interprofessional Education and Practice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Presenter(s): Dr. Margaret Stuber, Dr. Janice Sabin. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Series landing page

Annotation: Implicit or unconscious assumptions and biases challenge collaborative work within interprofessional teams and affect health equity for the population. Although pattern recognition is used by all health care professionals in their work, the results of assumptions made on the basis of past experience can be a hazard to client’s health. Women can be undertreated for heart disease, wealthy people may not be tested for HIV, or people of certain cultures may be undertreated for pain. Similarly, assumptions about people in specific professional fields may shape the way we interact, limiting the efficacy of our teams. This webinar addressed the definition and science of implicit or unconscious bias, as well as its role in contributing to social determinants of health. It used case examples to illustrate how unconscious bias affects clinical care, and discussed the research in this field. It presented ways to mitigate the effects of unconscious bias in health care, including diverse input in clinical decision-making and team care. It discussed how these ideas and objectives can be incorporated effectively into interprofessional education.

Learning Objectives: • Review the science of implicit social cognition and define implicit associations. • Describe situations in which unconscious bias may affect clinical care. • Identify strategies to minimize the influence of unconscious bias on interactions with patients and other healthcare professionals.

Special Instructions: All individuals will be required to set up a learner profile through a guest account to register for AIHC educational activities. More information about this one-time process and how to register for AIHC webinars can be found at https://aihc-us.org/AIHCregistration.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Communicating Effectively with Limited English Proficient Individuals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Interagency Working Group on Limited English Proficiency. Presenter(s): Aba Obrebski, Kristie Boutte, Chad Bennett, Charmaine Gibson. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: This video training series, in production since 2013, is part of a training toolkit designed to educate federal personnel on interacting with limited English proficient individuals. It was developed in response to the Attorney General’s February 2011 memorandum to all federal agencies, calling upon them to ensure that limited English proficient individuals can access federal government programs and services under Executive Order 13166. The training series is intended to help establish consistent and legally sound practices across the government when engaging in communications with limited English proficient individuals.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Strengthening Your MCH Workforce through Cultural Competency (Capacity Building Webinar #4). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Darcel Scharff, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 83 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter discusses strategies to engage and celebrate the communities that local public health professionals serve. Specific examples focus on the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency • Describe the role of cultural competency in workforce development for local public health professionals. • List barriers to becoming culturally competent. • Explain ways in which local public health professionals can become culturally competent. • Identify 1-2 examples of how to apply cultural competence to a workforce development opportunity for a home visitation program.

Continuing Education:

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

LGBTQ+ Cultural Humility Training for Health Center Staff. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: self paced.

Annotation: This course builds upon an introduction to LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts and practices for health clinic staff. This course was created by Michigan Forward in Enhancing Research and Community Equity (MFierce), a coalition of public health researchers, LGBTQ+ Youth Advisors, and community-based organizations working to reduce the burden of STIs in LGBTQ+ communities. This course covers the following topics: introduction to LGBTQ+ populations; desire, behavior, identities; gender and gender expression; sex assigned at birth; cultural competence versus cultural humility; elements of cultural humility practice; and examples of culturally humble practices. This course features testimonials from providers with extensive experience working with LGBTQ+ youth: Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. It also features testimonials from LGBTQ+ youth on experiences with culturally humble care: Zach Crutchfield, Marcos Carillo, Rama Arjita-Pollard, and Artemis Gorde.

Learning Objectives: • Identify LGBTQ+ cultural humility practices. (CHES Areas of Responsibility 2.3.4, 2.3.5). • Describe LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts. (2.3.4, 2.3.5).

Continuing Education: 1.0 Nursing Contact Hours (expires December 31, 2018); 1.0 CHES Category 1 CECH, Certificate of completion; $3 charge for CE credits

Health Literacy and Public Health: Introduction. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: New York City, Long Island, Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Part 2

Annotation: This self-paced online course introduces the concept of health literacy, provides strategies for considering literacy when creating public health messages for the general public and provides strategies for considering literacy in direct public health services to the public. The second part of this online course introduces the concept of health literacy, provides strategies for considering literacy when creating public health messages for the general public, and provides strategies for considering literacy in direct public health services to the public.

Learning Objectives: • Define fundamental literacy. • Define health literacy. • Describe how health literacy relates to public health. • List the four domains of health literacy. • Give an example of each of the four domains of health literacy. • List some coping strategies people use to compensate for their low literacy skills. • List some groups that are more likely to be less literate. • List some reasons why people may have low literacy. • List the consequences of low health literacy for individuals. • Describe why people, regardless of literacy skills, may fail to understand health information. • Give examples of how low literacy affects the essential services of public health. • List seven barriers to good communication in public health. • Provide an example for each barrier. • List seven techniques to improve health communication. • Define plain language. • Describe three communication strategies you can apply in your daily work.

Continuing Education: 1.5 CHES; 1.5 CME; 1.5 CNE Contact Hours

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.