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Health Equity Guide Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Human Impact Partners. Presenter(s): Linda Rae Murray, Rebekah Gowler, Deborah Garneau, Shawna Davie, Matias Valenzuela, Jordan Bingham, Evonda Smith, Sandi Galvez, Rex Archer, Lili Farhang, Andy Wessel, Jeanne Ayers. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: 255 minutes.

Annotation: This 4-part webinar series brings together national experts and local health departments to discuss their work to advance health equity. Each webinar focuses on a set of strategic practices that health departments can take to pursue a wall-to-wall transformation of how they work internally, with communities, and alongside other government agencies.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

The Occupational (Im)Possibilities in a Segregated Neighborhood: A Matter of Justice in LCHD. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Jyothi Gupta, PhD, ORT/L, FAOTA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the sixth in the LCRN’s series on Occupational Therapy and MCH: An Emerging Partnership to Improve Early Family Experiences and Life Course Health Development – features Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA. Dr. Gupta is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and Professor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at St. Catherine University. Her research interests are identifying contextual barriers to full participation of marginalized groups and identifying strategies to maximize participation. This webinar focuses on her experience in applying the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model to one of her community partner sites in rural Mississippi.

Learning Objectives: • Explore the conceptual synergy of life course health development (LCHD) model and the occupational perspective of health and well-being. • Describe the conceptual alignment of the occupational perspective to health development. • Discuss the occupational lives of children living in a racially segregated rural community and potential negative impact on health and well-being.

Listening Before We Speak: Understanding Our Audience in Times of Disaster #SomosSocial . Year Developed: 2016. Source: Federal Emergency Management Agency, Digitalgov. Presenter(s): Daniel Llargues, Lucia Castro Herrera. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Who is the audience? What is the social conversation? Those are the most common questions that tools like social listening can address to better understand your audience and their needs. Listening to the needs and concerns of your audience, and understanding how they use social media ultimately helps drive more informed content strategy and better allows us to be a part of the conversation. In times of disaster, the specific needs and ways to communicate with English speaking communities and Spanish speaking communities sometimes are different and often confused. In this webinar we will share our experience implementing social listening as a tool directed to our Spanish speaking audience and how to partner with other reliable sources to provide relevant content at every stage of the disaster. In addition, we will share lessons learned and best practices about our engagement. The webinar is aimed at: Anyone interested in social listening for Spanish speaking markets in the United States Digital and social media managers with content responsibilities in Spanish Anyone interested in social media, disasters and communications with limited English proficiency communities

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

LGBTQ+ Cultural Humility Training for Health Center Staff. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: self paced.

Annotation: This course builds upon an introduction to LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts and practices for health clinic staff. This course was created by Michigan Forward in Enhancing Research and Community Equity (MFierce), a coalition of public health researchers, LGBTQ+ Youth Advisors, and community-based organizations working to reduce the burden of STIs in LGBTQ+ communities. This course covers the following topics: introduction to LGBTQ+ populations; desire, behavior, identities; gender and gender expression; sex assigned at birth; cultural competence versus cultural humility; elements of cultural humility practice; and examples of culturally humble practices. This course features testimonials from providers with extensive experience working with LGBTQ+ youth: Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. It also features testimonials from LGBTQ+ youth on experiences with culturally humble care: Zach Crutchfield, Marcos Carillo, Rama Arjita-Pollard, and Artemis Gorde.

Learning Objectives: • Identify LGBTQ+ cultural humility practices. (CHES Areas of Responsibility 2.3.4, 2.3.5). • Describe LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts. (2.3.4, 2.3.5).

Continuing Education: 1.0 Nursing Contact Hours (expires December 31, 2018); 1.0 CHES Category 1 CECH, Certificate of completion; $3 charge for CE credits

Culture and Health Literacy: Case Studies in Culture and Health Literacy. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Three local efforts to address the health literacy gap in Minnesota are discussed. These include: the ECHO Project (Emergency Preparedness with Cultural Communities), PhotoVoice, and the Urban Health Agenda Community Advisory Committee (UHACAC). These projects represent cutting-edge work related to health literacy targeting cultural groups.

Learning Objectives: • Identify innovative strategies that can improve health literacy among cultural groups. • Discuss successes and challenges in designing and implementing strategies to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • Describe what other communities are doing to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • List what steps can be taken to stimulate further discussion on this topic.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.