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Displaying records 11 through 13 of 13 found.

Exploring Implicit Bias in Interprofessional Education and Practice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Presenter(s): Dr. Margaret Stuber, Dr. Janice Sabin. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Implicit or unconscious assumptions and biases challenge collaborative work within interprofessional teams and affect health equity for the population. Although pattern recognition is used by all health care professionals in their work, the results of assumptions made on the basis of past experience can be a hazard to client’s health. Women can be undertreated for heart disease, wealthy people may not be tested for HIV, or people of certain cultures may be undertreated for pain. Similarly, assumptions about people in specific professional fields may shape the way we interact, limiting the efficacy of our teams. This webinar addressed the definition and science of implicit or unconscious bias, as well as its role in contributing to social determinants of health. It used case examples to illustrate how unconscious bias affects clinical care, and discussed the research in this field. It presented ways to mitigate the effects of unconscious bias in health care, including diverse input in clinical decision-making and team care. It discussed how these ideas and objectives can be incorporated effectively into interprofessional education.

Learning Objectives: • Review the science of implicit social cognition and define implicit associations. • Describe situations in which unconscious bias may affect clinical care. • Identify strategies to minimize the influence of unconscious bias on interactions with patients and other healthcare professionals.

Special Instructions: All individuals will be required to set up a learner profile through a guest account to register for AIHC educational activities. More information about this one-time process and how to register for AIHC webinars can be found at https://aihc-us.org/AIHCregistration.

Organizational Development: Race, Language, and Ethnicity Data Collection. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Family Voices and National Center for Family/Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Julie Lucerno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH, presented on the collection of Race/Ethnicity and Language (REL) data. Collection of this data is important to tracking progress of health disparities across populations. Health disparities impact individual and family well-being throughout the United States by compounding and intersecting with traumatic life conditions such as the chronic strain of poverty and marginalization. The presentation included a brief history of health disparities and race/ethnicity categories; a description of why REL data are collected; and how to ask the questions. Facilitator: Trish Thomas, Family Voices; Speaker: Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH, Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Health Sciences Center and the Associate Director of the Center for Participatory Research, and a senior fellow with the New Mexico Center for the Advancement of Research Engagement and Science on Health Disparities Center (NM CARES), a National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities funded center.

LGBTQ+ Cultural Humility Training for Health Center Staff. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: self paced.

Annotation: This course builds upon an introduction to LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts and practices for health clinic staff. This course was created by Michigan Forward in Enhancing Research and Community Equity (MFierce), a coalition of public health researchers, LGBTQ+ Youth Advisors, and community-based organizations working to reduce the burden of STIs in LGBTQ+ communities. This course covers the following topics: introduction to LGBTQ+ populations; desire, behavior, identities; gender and gender expression; sex assigned at birth; cultural competence versus cultural humility; elements of cultural humility practice; and examples of culturally humble practices. This course features testimonials from providers with extensive experience working with LGBTQ+ youth: Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. It also features testimonials from LGBTQ+ youth on experiences with culturally humble care: Zach Crutchfield, Marcos Carillo, Rama Arjita-Pollard, and Artemis Gorde.

Learning Objectives: • Identify LGBTQ+ cultural humility practices. (CHES Areas of Responsibility 2.3.4, 2.3.5). • Describe LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts. (2.3.4, 2.3.5).

Continuing Education: 1.0 Nursing Contact Hours (expires December 31, 2018); 1.0 CHES Category 1 CECH, Certificate of completion; $3 charge for CE credits

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.